Stephanie Wood

CLLAS Seed Grant Project to Grow at Library of Congress

Stephanie Wood Named 2022-2023 Jay I. Kislak Chair at the Library of Congress

 Stephanie Wood will be the 2022-2023 Jay I. Kislak Chair at the Library of Congress, a position dedicated to the Study of History and Cultures of the Early Americas. As Chair, Wood will advance the Visual Lexicon of Aztec Hieroglyphs, a project that began as a CLLAS funded research project.

“The online searchable database currently has about 1800 hieroglyphs from the Codex Mendoza (c. 1541),” says Wood.  “The goal in the next academic year is to double the dataset in collaboration with colleagues from Mexico, Spain, and the U.S. and to enhance and host a decipherment tool to assist scholars who are striving to analyze glyphs on additional codices. We are also beginning to add examples of iconography that could be helpful in achieving a deeper understanding of the intended meaning of hieroglyphs. Another long-range goal is to create materials for teaching hieroglyphs to students anywhere, but especially those who have Mexican origins and might be interested in learning more about their rich heritage.”

The Jay I. Kislak Chair was created four years ago for senior scholars, and it represents a career capstone. One cannot apply for this position, it is bestowed, with candidates being nominated and then chosen by a selection committee.   Recipients are allowed to work on a research project of their choice for nine months with generous support.  The endowment also funds an international symposium that will host guests who share the research interest of the Chair.

The Visual Lexicon of Aztec Hieroglyphs (while still in development) can be seen here:https://aztecglyphs.uoregon.edu/

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Visual Lexicon of Aztec Hieroglyphs, a Stephanie Wood Work-in-Progress Report

April 7, 2021
12:00 pm

VIDEO

To view a recording of this remote event, FOLLOW THIS LINK.

This digital humanities project has as its focus the visual writing system developed by the Nahuas of central Mexico in pre-contact times and which lived on well after contact. This writing system bequeathed a rich historical and cultural corpus of manuscripts (codices) that infuse our knowledge of central Mexican indigenous peoples with respect for their ingenuity, diligent record keeping, appreciation for historical memory and narrative. 

Winner of the CLLAS Faculty Seed Grant, Stephanie Wood is the Director of the Wired Humanities Projects and a Research Associate with the Center for Equity Promotion (CEQP) in the College of Education at the University of Oregon.  Between 1992 and 2015, she taught on campus and directed dozens of theses in various departments, such as History, Latin American Studies, Women’s and Gender Studies, International Studies, and Romance Languages. But for more than a decade, her principal focus has been externally-funded digital reference and curricular projects on under-represented aspects of history (Mesoamerican and Native American), primarily with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). She has been the Principal Investigator on eleven NEH projects and has held sub-awards on another two.

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Monday, March 29th, 2021 Affiliated faculty, Event Videos, Events No Comments

National Park Service unit honors Stephanie Wood

Dr. Stephanie Wood (middle) stands on the bank of the Missouri River outside the National Park Service’s Midwest Regional office with Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Education Specialist, Tom Smith (left), and American Indian Liaison Alisha Deegan (right).

April 29, 2019— Stephanie Wood, research associate in the College of Education and studio instructor for the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, received the Outstanding Partner Award from a unit of the National Park Service called the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Wood is the University of Oregon’s principal investigator in the project Honoring Tribal Legacies, which aims to include indigenous perspectives in the classroom.

Stephanie Wood is a long-time CLLAS faculty affiliate.

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Tuesday, April 30th, 2019 Affiliated faculty, Awards, Uncategorized No Comments

CLLAS Professional Development Series: NEH/Government Grant Writing Workshop

February 7, 2019
12:00 pmto1:30 pm

330 Hendricks Hall

Led by Dr. Stephanie Wood (Education)

CLLAS Professional Development: NEH Grant Writing and more

The Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS) invites junior faculty and graduate students to join us on Thursday, February 7.

Dr. Stephanie Wood (Center for Equity Promotion) will share tips and strategies for writing successful research grant proposals, applicable not only to NEH but also to other external funding for grants for humanities and social sciences. 

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Scholar Stephanie Wood soon to launch glyph translation tool: “Visual Lexicon of Aztec Hieroglyphs”

A glyph translation tool: The Visual Lexicon of Aztec Hieroglyphs

Stephanie Wood, an ethnohistorian and specialist in Mesoamerican culture who is affiliated with the UO College of Education, will soon be launching the creation of a glyph translation tool, the “Visual Lexicon of Aztec Hieroglyphs,” which unites the work of scholars in Mexico, the U.S., Germany, and the Netherlands.  

The tool will be created with the participation of a Latinx student team at the UO. The result will be a free, online, searchable database of the atomic parts of compound glyphs, all named, annotated, and with attestations of the ways that they appear in compound glyphs in known 16th-century codices, such as the Codex Mendoza, the Codex Xolotl, and others.  The resulting site will be at least trilingual, using Nahuatl, Spanish and English.

The goals of the Visual Lexicon are manifold: 1) to provide a tool for scholars deciphering glyphs in under-studied or newly discovered codices; 2) to help with the teaching and self-study of glyph decipherment; 3) to deepen our understanding of the Aztec writing system (reading order, phoneticism, regional styles, etc.); 4) to prepare pedagogical pathways that highlight Aztec cultural hallmarks; and, 5) to be merged with the online Nahuatl dictionary Wood serves from Oregon, besides standing alone .

This project is a collaboration with professor and principal investigator Benjamin D. Johnson at the University of Massachusetts, and it is funded out of his three-year grant from National Endowment for the Humanities.

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