Events

LatinX Heritage Month: A festival of culture, history and traditio


from Around the O

Sept. 25, 2018—From art exhibits to film screenings to operas to a celebration of life and death, this year’s UO LatinX Heritage Month honors the diverse LatinX community.

With events spanning late September to early November, LatinX Heritage Month at the UO and across the United States examines and affirms the culture, history, traditions and current issues of diverse Americans whose origins or ancestors are from Mexico, Spain, the Caribbean, or Central and South America.

Campus and community members can hear a gallery talk by artist Elsa Mora about her new exhibition, “Paper Weight: Works in Paper,” or see Diego Rivera’s “La ofrenda” and Rufino Tamayo’s “Perro aullando a la luna,” on loan for a year to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art from the collection of Art Bridges.

The Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies will sponsor events with film director Peter Bratt, including a teach-in on film and activism and a film screening and discussion. Bratt is an award-winning screenwriter and independent filmmaker and the co-writer and director of “Dolores,” a feature documentary about the life of activist Dolores Huerta.

Also, the Wayne Morse Center and the UO chapter of Define American will show a screening of the award-winning documentary, “Harvest of Empire: The Untold Story of Latinos in America,” followed by a discussion. › Continue reading

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Tuesday, September 25th, 2018 Art, Music & Culture, Celebration No Comments

“Power in Puerto Rico”

September 29, 2018
6:00 pmto8:00 pm

Temple Beth Israel
1175 East 29th Avenue
Eugene, OR 97405

“Power in Puerto Rico” 

Political • Economic • Environmental

  • History & analysis by UO Professor Cecilia Enjuto-Rangel and David Sáez, Director, Centro Latino Americano
  • Enjoy a simple Puerto Rican dinner • Music by Rico Perez

This is a fundraiser for Puerto Rico relief, but no one will be turned away for lack of funds.

www.tbieugene.org / info@tbieugene.com / 541.485.7218

Wednesday, September 19th, 2018 Events, Puerto Rico No Comments

Teach-In & Film Screening with director Peter Brett: Dolores

October 22, 2018
11:00 amto12:30 pm
4:00 pmto6:30 pm

 

 
 

CLLAS Teach-In: Film and Activism with film director Peter Bratt
Monday, October 22, 11:00am-12:30pm 
Crater Lake Rooms, EMU

CLLAS Film Screening & Discussion with film director Peter Bratt: DOLORES
Monday, October 22, 4:00pm-6:30pm 
Redwood Auditorium, EMU

United Farm Workers leader Dolores Huerta / photo by George Ballis

DOLORES HUERTA 

Dolores Huerta is among the most important, yet least known, activists in American history. An equal partner in co-founding the first farm workers unions with Cesar Chavez, her enormous contributions have gone largely unrecognized. Dolores tirelessly led the fight for racial and labor justice alongside Chavez, becoming one of the most defiant feminists of the twentieth century—and she continues the fight to this day, at 87. With intimate and unprecedented access to this intensely private mother to eleven, the film reveals the raw, personal stakes involved in committing one’s life to social change. Directed by Peter Bratt. 

PETER BRATT, Producer, Writer & Director 

Peter Bratt is an award-winning screenwriter and independent filmmaker whose first fea-ture FOLLOW ME HOME premiered in competition at the 1996 Sun-dance Film Festival and won the Best Feature Film Audience Award that same year at the San Francisco International Film Festival. In 2009, he and his brother Benjamin produced LA MISSION, a feature film shot on location in their hometown of San Francisco. The film, which Peter wrote and directed, premiered at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival and was the opening night film at the 2009 San Francis-co International Film Festival, the 2009 New York International Lati-no Film Festival, and the 2009 Outfest Film Festival in Los Angeles. For his work on LA MISSION, Peter received the prestigious Norman Lear Writer’s Award and was one of ten American independent filmmakers selected by Sundance and the President’s Committee on Arts and Humanities to launch Sundance Film Forward, a program that uses film and conversation to excite and intro-duce a new generation to the power of story. Peter is a San Francisco Film Commissioner and a long-time consultant for the Friendship House Association of American Indians, a local non-profit serving the Bay Area’s Native population. 

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Tuesday, September 18th, 2018 Events, Farmworker Rights No Comments

Barbara Sutton “Surviving State Terror: Women’s Testimonies of Repression and Resistance in Argentina”

October 25, 2018
12:30 pmto2:00 pm

Gerlinger Alumni Lounge
1468 University Street
UO campus
Free & open to the public

Surviving State Terror: Women’s Testimonies of Repression and Resistance in Argentina

Barbara Sutton, Associate Professor, Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
University at Albany, State University of New York

Barbara Sutton completed her PhD in sociology at the University of Oregon in 2004. This presentation is based on Sutton’s recently published book, Surviving State Terror. Based on oral testimonies of women who survived clandestine detention centers during a period of state terrorism in Argentina (1976–83), this book illuminates the gendered and embodied forms of trauma that women endured while also highlighting their historical and political agency.

Barbara Sutton / photo by Juana Ghersa

Through the lens of the body as a cross-cutting theme, the book examines gendered dimensions of experience during captivity and beyond. Sexual violence as a weapon of state terror is addressed, yet the book also shows more subtle dynamics of gender inscription through torture. Similarly, though the study attends to motherhood ideologies and the egregious treatment of pregnant women in captivity, it also explores women’s experiences beyond maternity. Public and scholarly discourse has tended to pay attention to the relatives of the people disappeared, particularly mothers; this book makes a needed contribution by bringing to the fore the stories of women who themselves were forcibly disappeared, but ultimately survived.

Surviving State Terror incorporates women survivors’ narratives of solidarity, resistance, and political organizing as well as their perspectives on social change, human rights, and democracy. The book draws on the urgent lessons that women survivors offer to a world that continues to grapple with atrocities. In the words of pioneering scholar of gender and militarization, Cynthia Enloe, the book “reveals how our listening to these women is crucial for sustainable democracy.” Distinguished sociologist Cecilia Menjívar adds that the “author masterfully reveals intersections of state terror and gender ideologies with clear relevance across space and time. A must read.”

Sponsored by the Department of Sociology; Center for the Study of Women in Society; Department of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies; and the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies.

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Tuesday, September 18th, 2018 Books, Events, Research No Comments

Bernice Yeung: “The Invisible #MeToos: The fight to end sexual violence against America’s most vulnerable workers”

September 24, 2018
2:00 pmto3:30 pm

Lewis Lounge
Knight Law Center
1515 Agate St.

Race, Ethnicities, and Inequalities Colloquium

Bernice Yeung / Credit: Rachel de Leon/Reveal

Bernice Yeung, Investigative Reporter
Reveal (Center for Investigative Reporting)

From the Reveal website

Bernice Yeung is a reporter for Reveal, covering race and gender. Her work examines issues related to violence against women, labor and employment, immigration, and environmental health.

“Yeung was part of the national Emmy-nominated Rape in the Fields reporting team, which investigated the sexual assault of immigrant farmworkers. The project won an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award and was a finalist for the Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting. › Continue reading

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Thursday, July 19th, 2018 Events, Farmworker Rights, Human Rights, Labor No Comments

CLLAS Workshop “From Manila to London to Rio: Two Cases Outside the Canon”

April 4, 2018
12:00 pmto1:00 pm

Jane Grant Conference Room
330 Hendricks Hall
1408 University St.
UO campus

2017-19 CLLAS Series: America, Bridge Across Oceans 

presented by Chương-Đaì Võ

This talk will focus on two case studies, exemplary of non-canonical modernism and contemporaneity—the periodical Signals and the exhibition The Other Story. Edited by the Manila-born, international artist David Medalla, Signals was a periodical that ran for 10 issues from August 1964 to March 1966. Unlike the post-World War II art scenes that were developing in much of Western Europe and the U.S., Signals engaged with the Latin American avant-garde, and understood art as a meeting ground for aesthetics, physics, literature, poetry, and social transformation. Medalla was part of a group of artists from Asia, Africa and the Caribbean that Rasheed Araeen proposed for an exhibition entitled The Other Story in 1978. Not staged until 1989, the exhibition’s premise—that British art history actively erased and ignored the contributions of artists of color—invigorated Araeen’s practice as an artist, curator and the founder of the influential periodical Third Text

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Saturday, February 3rd, 2018 America Bridge Across Oceans, Events No Comments



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2017 Latino Roots Celebration

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