Affiliated faculty

Scholar Stephanie Wood soon to launch glyph translation tool: “Visual Lexicon of Aztec Hieroglyphs”

A glyph translation tool: The Visual Lexicon of Aztec Hieroglyphs

Stephanie Wood, an ethnohistorian and specialist in Mesoamerican culture who is affiliated with the UO College of Education, will soon be launching the creation of a glyph translation tool, the “Visual Lexicon of Aztec Hieroglyphs,” which unites the work of scholars in Mexico, the U.S., Germany, and the Netherlands.  

The tool will be created with the participation of a Latinx student team at the UO. The result will be a free, online, searchable database of the atomic parts of compound glyphs, all named, annotated, and with attestations of the ways that they appear in compound glyphs in known 16th-century codices, such as the Codex Mendoza, the Codex Xolotl, and others.  The resulting site will be at least trilingual, using Nahuatl, Spanish and English.

The goals of the Visual Lexicon are manifold: 1) to provide a tool for scholars deciphering glyphs in under-studied or newly discovered codices; 2) to help with the teaching and self-study of glyph decipherment; 3) to deepen our understanding of the Aztec writing system (reading order, phoneticism, regional styles, etc.); 4) to prepare pedagogical pathways that highlight Aztec cultural hallmarks; and, 5) to be merged with the online Nahuatl dictionary Wood serves from Oregon, besides standing alone .

This project is a collaboration with professor and principal investigator Benjamin D. Johnson at the University of Massachusetts, and it is funded out of his three-year grant from National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Undocumented and DACAmented Mental Health

Blog Post by Eric Garcia, PhD, Senior Staff Therapist & Latinx Student Specialist
from the UO Counseling Center website at: https://counseling.uoregon.edu/undocumented-and-dacamented-mental-health

see also: https://cllas.uoregon.edu/resources/daca-info/latinx-undocumented-student-specialists/

Photo by Molly Adams (CC BY 2.0)

It goes without saying that being a dreamer or undocumented can feel like a nightmare. You are tasked with moving forward without the same opportunities provided to others around you. If you have DACA, you’re only able to plan two years of your life a time (assuming there are no abrupt executive orders). If you are mixed-status, you may be greatly worried about your family and loved ones. If you are undocumented and do not consider yourself a dreamer or DACAmented, you may have well-intentioned people (such as myself) who do not always address your unique experiences.

Some of these identities may mean that you miss out on experiences like driving a car, studying abroad, or receiving financial aid. You most likely also have to deal with anti-immigrant rhetoric or experience overt racism and xenophobia in your daily life. Lastly, you may feel the need to keep this aspect of your life to yourself, while only letting a trusted few know what you are going through. I name these experiences not to bring more worries to you, but rather, to acknowledge in amazement the profound challenges that you continue to surmount, as well as to offer some guidance and resources as you continue to press on. › Continue reading

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Stephanie Wood will lead educators along the Lewis & Clark Trail

Editor’s Note: CLLAS affiliated faculty member Stephanie Wood will lead schoolteachers along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail.

Prof hits the trail to get another view of Native American history / from Around the O

October 30, 2018—Next summer, 25 schoolteachers will embark on a 550-mile expedition along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail to uncover new knowledge: how to better integrate Native American histories into their curriculum.

The trip is part of an initiative led by the UO’s Stephanie Wood to help educators create a more balanced and judicious approach to the nation’s history by weaving the experiences of indigenous peoples into their teaching. Wood, a research associate in the College of Education, was awarded $179,247 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support the Discovering Native Histories Along the Lewis and Clark Trail summer institute.

The institute will draw from seminars, an immersive trip along the historic trail and meetings with tribes to help participants deepen and reframe the Lewis and Clark story.  › Continue reading

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Alaí Reyes-Santos: “What It Means To Be a Black Latina in Higher Education”

by Alaí Reyes-Santos, Associate Professor, UO Department of Ethnic Studies
posted in Hip Latina,

“I have been asserting my blackness since I can remember.

“Growing up in the mountains of Puerto Rico, my curls —‘pelo malo,’as friends called it—betrayed my family’s attempts to claim whiteness by invoking our Spanish great grandfather. Why would my grandmother, who loved me deeply, say that my hair ‘does not come from our side of the family’?

“As we experience university responses to the Black Lives Matter Movement, Black Latinxs relive the everyday violence I faced during my childhood. Black Latinas are made invisible by intellectual and pedagogical initiatives. Data rarely documents Afro-Latino experiences in education, housing and employment, though they are similar to African American ones; AfroLatinx activists and Afro-Latinx Studies scholars seek that recognition.”

For the full blog post

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Clark Honors College historian Mark Carey earns fame as a mountaineer

https://around.uoregon.edu/content/clark-honors-college-historian-earns-fame-mountaineer

from Around the O, Sept. 19, 2018—Mark Carey never saw it coming, but his 20 years of research in a region of South America strongly affected by glaciers have elevated him into international mountaineering fame.

Carey, a historian in the UO’s Clark Honors College and director of the Environmental Studies Program, received the King Albert Mountain Award during ceremonies Sept. 8 in Pontresina, Switzerland. The honor goes to “persons or institutions that have distinguished themselves in some way in the mountain world.”

Carey was joined at the winner’s podium in the King Albert I Memorial Foundation’s 13th award ceremony by Iranian female mountain explorer Nasim Eshqi, Swiss filmmakers who documented a cross-country skiing trip on the Silk Road, and representatives of Italy’s Val Grande National Park.

“I was pretty surprised. I was in shock when they got in touch with me,” Carey said. “I appreciate this award because it values the historical context that I bring into research on glaciers, climate change and natural hazards. And it recognizes the fundamental importance of cross-disciplinary collaborations, which I have increasingly put at the forefront of my research practices with concepts like hydro-social modeling and integrated disaster prevention.” › Continue reading

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Thursday, September 20th, 2018 Affiliated faculty, Awards No Comments

Indigenous Rights and Environmental Justice: Info Session

November 16, 2018
12:00 pmto1:00 pm

Straub Hall, 245
1451 Onyx Street, Eugene, OR 97403

Come talk with UO professor Derrick Hindrey about indigenous communities in Bolivia!

This program will focus on concrete contemporary topics, including indigenous peoples and climate justice; hydrocarbons development and conflicts on indigenous lands; legal developments and challenges; natural resource management in indigenous territories (e.g. community-forestry); development encroachment; transnational indigenous environmental movements; conservation of biodiversity related to indigenous peoples’ intellectual property rights; mining and dams; and finally indigenous agroecology.

Program Dates:

June 22 – July 13, 2019

Application Deadlines:

Priority – February 15 ($100 off your program)

Final – Marh 15

Find out more information and APPLY TODAY:

https://geo.uoregon.edu/programs/bolivia/indigenous-rights-and-environmental-justice-in-bolivia

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Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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