Native American

Stephanie Wood will lead educators along the Lewis & Clark Trail

Editor’s Note: CLLAS affiliated faculty member Stephanie Wood will lead schoolteachers along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail.

Prof hits the trail to get another view of Native American history / from Around the O

October 30, 2018—Next summer, 25 schoolteachers will embark on a 550-mile expedition along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail to uncover new knowledge: how to better integrate Native American histories into their curriculum.

The trip is part of an initiative led by the UO’s Stephanie Wood to help educators create a more balanced and judicious approach to the nation’s history by weaving the experiences of indigenous peoples into their teaching. Wood, a research associate in the College of Education, was awarded $179,247 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support the Discovering Native Histories Along the Lewis and Clark Trail summer institute.

The institute will draw from seminars, an immersive trip along the historic trail and meetings with tribes to help participants deepen and reframe the Lewis and Clark story.  › Continue reading

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Environmental Justice, Race, and Public Lands: A Symposium

May 9, 2018toMay 11, 2018

 

Full Schedule: https://blogs.uoregon.edu/ejrpl/

Cosponsored by CLLAS

This symposium focuses on issues of equity and environmental justice on public lands. The event brings together practitioners engaged in
diversity, equity, and inclusion work throughout the Pacific Northwest with scholars focused on race, environmental justice, and/or Indigeneity as they relate to public lands.

  • Wednesday, May 9th @ 6:30pm in the Many Nations Longhouse: Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples Lecture featuring Dr. Karletta Chief and Dr. Margaret Hiza-Redsteer.
  • Thursday, May 10th @ 7:30pm in Straub 156: Dr. Kyle Powys Whyte will deliver a keynote entitled “Ironic Storytelling for Public Lands: Indigenizing Justice and Coalition-Building.”
  • Friday, May 11th @ 7:30pm in Straub 156: Dr. Carolyn Finney, the author of Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors, will deliver the final keynote.

The symposium also includes panels on Practioner Perspectives on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion on Public Lands, Historical perspectives on Race, Environmental Justice, and Public Lands, Decolonizing Public Lands, and Labor as Public Lands Environmental Justice Issue. › Continue reading

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Saturday, January 6th, 2018 Conference, Events, Native American, Public Policy No Comments

“The Border and Its Meaning: Forgotten Stories” 7th Annual CSWS Northwest Women Writers Symposium

April 25, 2018
2:30 pmto4:30 pm
6:00 pmto8:00 pm

Laila Lalami

 

 


cosponsored by CLLAS

Panel Discussion: 3:00 – 4:30 PM UO campus: JSMA Ford Lecture Hall
Light reception: 2:30 – 3 p.m. JSMA Ford Lecture Hall

Laila Lalami, novelist and columnist for The Nation, will read portions of her novel The Moor’s Account, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Commenting on their selected passages will be panelists:

  • Liz Bohls, PhD, Professor, Department of English
  • Miriam Gershow, MFA, novelist & Associate Director of Composition, Department of English
  • Angela Joya, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of International Studies
  • Lamia Karim, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology
  • Michael Najjar, MFA, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Theatre Arts

Keynote, Laila Lalami: “The Border and Its Meaning: Forgotten Stories,” 6 PM Eugene Public Library (with Q&A followed by booksigning)

To be held April 25, 2018, the 7th annual CSWS Northwest Women Writers Symposium will feature Pulitzer  finalist Laila Lalami and her novel The Moor’s Account› Continue reading

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Winona LaDuke: “Rights of Nature”

November 19, 2016
7:00 pmto9:00 pm

Erb Memorial Union
EMU Ballroom
1222 E. 13th Ave.
UO campus

Winona LaDuke

Winona LaDuke

Winona LaDuke is a celebrated Native American activist and leader, environmentalist, speaker, and author. Residing on the White Earth reservation in northern Minnesota, Ms. LaDuke is the Executive Director of Honor the Earth, where she works on the national level to advance Native environmental issues and sustainable Native communities.

The former Green Party nominee for Vice President of the United States and Ms. Magazine Woman of the Year is also a founding director of the White Earth Land Recovery Project. LaDuke will debunk the widely-held notion reducing Nature to property and discuss the international movement dedicated to legally recognizing Nature’s right to exist, persist and naturally evolve.

Sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences and by Ethnic Studies, Environmental Studies, and Native American Studies and by the Center for the Study of Women in Society.

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NWWS Documentary Film Premiere “Sad Happiness: Cinthya’s Transborder Journey,” directed by Lynn Stephen

May 6, 2016
12:00 pmto1:00 pm

Sad-Happiness-DVD-front-coverKnight Library
Browsing Room
1501 Kincaid St.
UO campus

5th annual CSWS Northwest Women Writers Symposium

“Crossing Borders: Women’s Stories of Immigration, Migration, and Transition,” May 6 – 7, 2016

Documentary Film Premiere: 12-1 p.m. “Sad Happiness: Cinthya’s Transborder Journey,” followed by Q&A with the director. 

Directed by Lynn Stephen, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Ethnic Studies at the University of Oregon and co-director of the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS). Produced by Sonia De La Cruz and Lynn Stephen.

Sad Happiness: Cinthya’s Transborder Journey explores the differential rights that U.S. citizen children and their undocumented parents have through the story of one extended Zapotec family. Shot in Oregon and Oaxaca, Mexico, and narrated by 11-year old Cinthya, the film follows Cinthya’s trip to her parent’s home community of Teotitlán del Valle with her godmother, anthropologist Lynn Stephen. There she meets her extended family and discovers her indigenous Zapotec and Mexican roots. While in Oaxaca, she participates in her community’s annual celebration of their patron saint, learns how to make chocolate and spin wool, explores a Zapotec archaeological site, and shares in a family party where she dances with her great-grandmother. Her absent parents are omnipresent on the trip as Cinthya’s cousins, aunts, uncles, grandparents and great-grandparents all talk to her about them and how they wish for their return. › Continue reading

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Conference delves into effects of climate change on native people

December 2, 2014
7:00 pmto9:00 pm
December 3, 2014
Keynote speaker Patricia Cochran

Keynote speaker Patricia Cochran

Many Nations Longhouse
1630 Columbia St.
Eugene, Oregon
UO campus

Conference delves into effects of climate change on native people | Around the O.

The University of Oregon will host the 3rd Annual Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples Conference and Student Symposium: Environment, Culture and Indigenous Sovereignty in the Americas on December 2-3, 2014. The University will welcome Patricia Cochran as the keynote speaker. Ms. Cochran is Executive Director of the Alaska Native Science Commission (ANSC), an organization that works to create links and collaborations among scientists, researchers and Alaska Native communities. The conference will also feature presentations of research conducted by over 60 UO students and 4 visiting indigenous students.

For more information, visit the conference website: http://ccip.uoregon.edu/




Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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