Funding

CLLAS Research Grant deadlines

March 1, 2019
12:00 pm
April 5, 2019
12:00 pm

Graduate Research Grants: Deadline March 1, 2019

CLLAS offers both Tinker Field Research Grants and CLLAS Graduate Research Grants. Application deadline for graduate student grants is: 12:00 pm (noon), Friday, March 1, 2019.

Faculty Grants: Deadline April 5, 2019

CLLAS offers both Faculty Collaborative Research Grants and the Faculty Latinx Studies Seed Grant. Application deadline for faculty grants is: 12:00 p.m. (noon), Friday, April 5, 2019.

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CLLAS Professional Development Series: NEH/Government Grant Writing Workshop

February 7, 2019
12:00 pmto1:30 pm

330 Hendricks Hall

Led by Dr. Stephanie Wood (Education)

CLLAS Professional Development: NEH Grant Writing and more

The Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS) invites junior faculty and graduate students to join us on Thursday, February 7.

Dr. Stephanie Wood (Center for Equity Promotion) will share tips and strategies for writing successful research grant proposals, applicable not only to NEH but also to other external funding for grants for humanities and social sciences. 

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Graduate Student Grant Writing Workshop

January 22, 2019
12:00 pmto1:30 pm

 

 

Jane Grant Room
330 Hendricks Hall

CLLAS Professional Development Series

Grant-Writing Workshop for Graduate Students

The Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies will hold its annual Grant Writing Workshop targeted toward graduate students on January 22, 2019.

Erin Beck, associate professor of political science, will share tips and strategies for writing successful research grant proposals. This will be an opportunity to learn more about CLLAS’s summer 2019 grants for graduate students. Professor Beck will also answer questions about applying for Tinker Field Research Grants. For more information, please contact cllas@uoregon.edu.

see also: https://cllas.uoregon.edu/grant-opportunities/calls-for-proposals/

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Tuesday, January 1st, 2019 Events, Funding, Graduate students No Comments

Linguistics professor Gabriela Pérez Báez gets NEH grant to protect indigenous languages

Linguistics prof gets NEH grant to protect indigenous languages

Around the O / December 12, 2018 — To date, more than 7,000 languages are spoken around the world. As Gabriela Pérez Báez explains, languages hold critical knowledge about the history of survival of the communities of speakers, their ecological perspectives and their well-being.

Gabriela Pérez Báez

Pérez Báez is an assistant professor in the University of Oregon’s linguistics department and serves as the director of its new Language Revitalization Lab. She also serves as co-director for the National Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages and works with the UO’s Northwest Indian Language Institute, known as NILI.

Of the more than 300 languages spoken at the time of contact with Europeans in what is now the United States, more than half stopped being spoken as a result of colonization and state-building policies. These languages are considered to be dormant or sleeping. Many more are highly endangered today.

“The language communities recognize how critical the languages are and as a result have engaged in the arduous work of researching the languages in historical archives in order to reconstruct them and bring them back to use,” Pérez Báez said.

The Northwest Indian Language Institute provides training to Native American teachers working to revitalize many of these languages. Institute staff also partner with tribes to carry out on-site trainings and develop curriculum to teach highly endangered or sleeping languages in the classroom.

The institute’s efforts are being recognized with the announcement earlier in the fall that the National Breath of Life, of which the institute is a partner, has received support through a $311,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The grant was awarded to Daryl Baldwin, director of the Myaamia Center at Miami University, and Pérez Báez.

Since 2011, the National Breath of Life has provided training on the use of archival documentation for the revitalization of highly endangered and dormant languages to 117 community researchers from 55 language communities. With this growth comes the need for software to support the advancement of the research.

In response, the upcoming NEH-funded National Breath of Life 2.0 workshops are designed to provide participants with training in the use of the new indigenous languages digital archive. The archival system is the only available software that allows for the organization, storage and retrieval of digital copies of linguistic archival materials.

It directly links independent data derived from linguistic analysis to original manuscript pages. Pérez Báez said its powerful search function allows for the in-depth linguistic analysis required for the reconstruction of highly endangered or dormant languages.

The indigenous languages digital archive is modeled after the Miami-Illinois digital archive, also funded by a prior NEH grant and designed by the Myaamia Center to advance research for the revitalization of the heritage language of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma.

Pérez Báez said the grant will support the refinement of indigenous languages digital archive. It will also provide funding to hold two training workshops for community researchers engaged in language revitalization to learn how to use the archival system. The community researchers will then have access to the software free of charge.

The grant “has had significant positive impact on our ability to utilize archival materials for our revitalization effort,” Baldwin said. “It is an important step in the development of National Breath of Life to be able to share this technology with other tribal communities.”

A National Breath of Life 2.0 workshop will be held at Miami University in July 2019. Applications to the 2019 workshop are being accepted at www.nationalbreathoflife.org. The deadline is Saturday, Dec. 15.

The UO institute will hold a second workshop in Eugene in 2020.

“NILI is excited to be partnering with the National Breath of Life in this important national workshop, and we look forward to hosting community language leaders from across the nation,” said Janne Underriner, director of the institute.

—By David Austin, University Communications

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New children’s book, movie put a song in professor’s heart

Ernesto Martínez

Editor’s note: CLLAS is one of several UO units that awarded research funds to Prof. Ernesto Javier Martínez in support of this creative work. Martínez received the inaugural CLLAS Faculty Latinx Studies seed grant award.

A new book and film have a University of Oregon professor singing a happy tune.

December 10, 2018 (from Around the O)—Ernesto Javier Martínez, an associate professor of ethnic studies at the UO, is a scholar of queer ethnic literature and the author of “When We Love Someone We Sing to Them.” It’s a children’s book about a young Mexican-American boy who is learning from his musician father why serenading is such an important tradition in their family.

“The boy asks his father if there’s a song to sing for a boy who loves another boy, and the story follows their journey of finding a song and having the courage to express affection publicly,” Martinez said.

Martínez, who identifies as a queer Chicano Puerto Rican man, said he grew up singing in a trio with his father and brother, so from a very early age he understood the important role music played for Latinx immigrant families in sharing history, providing comfort and reinforcing community. 

“But very quickly I started to feel a little bit alienated from it because there weren’t songs for boys who loved boys, and at one point I even stopped singing,” Martínez said. He added that he felt a bit of trauma in being a part of a musical tradition that applauded his singing voice but remained uninterested in his queer experiences and desires.    › Continue reading

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DuckFunder: Help our UO Dreamer Students Pay for College!

UO Fund the Dream Scholarships
Help our UO Dreamer Students Pay for College!

Help the UO Dreamers Working Group raise scholarship funds for our undocumented and Dreamer students. Every year in Oregon, Dreamer students transition from high school to college to continue their education. Undocumented students, including Tuition Equity and DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals), do not qualify for Federal Financial Aid. They are also ineligible for many other forms of financial aid that students typically use to fund their education. It is very common for them to take a term off every year to work and raise money for tuition.

Our Dreamers are hard working, bright, determinedDucks!They are just like every other Duck.They have goals of owning their own business, working in our communities, and supporting their families. We believe nothing should stand in their way of a college degree.And though our Dreamer students face many stressors,we can help them graduate! This scholarship aims to provide some financial relief, allowing them to complete their degrees and fulfill their goal of becoming a Duck Alumnion graduation day!

Go to: DuckFunder for Dreamers

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Monday, December 3rd, 2018 Funding No Comments



Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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