Research

Bernice Yeung: “The Invisible #MeToos: The fight to end sexual violence against America’s most vulnerable workers”

September 24, 2018
2:00 pmto3:30 pm

Lewis Lounge
Knight Law Center
1515 Agate St.

Race, Ethnicities, and Inequalities Colloquium

Bernice Yeung / Credit: Rachel de Leon/Reveal

Bernice Yeung, Investigative Reporter
Reveal (Center for Investigative Reporting)

From the Reveal website

Bernice Yeung is a reporter for Reveal, covering race and gender. Her work examines issues related to violence against women, labor and employment, immigration, and environmental health.

“Yeung was part of the national Emmy-nominated Rape in the Fields reporting team, which investigated the sexual assault of immigrant farmworkers. The project won an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award and was a finalist for the Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting. › Continue reading

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Wednesday, September 19th, 2018 Events, Farmworker Rights, Human Rights, Labor No Comments

Barbara Sutton “Surviving State Terror: Women’s Testimonies of Repression and Resistance in Argentina”

October 25, 2018
12:30 pmto2:00 pm

Gerlinger Alumni Lounge
1468 University Street
UO campus
Free & open to the public

Surviving State Terror: Women’s Testimonies of Repression and Resistance in Argentina

Barbara Sutton, Associate Professor, Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
University at Albany, State University of New York

Barbara Sutton completed her PhD in sociology at the University of Oregon in 2004. This presentation is based on Sutton’s recently published book, Surviving State Terror. Based on oral testimonies of women who survived clandestine detention centers during a period of state terrorism in Argentina (1976–83), this book illuminates the gendered and embodied forms of trauma that women endured while also highlighting their historical and political agency.

Barbara Sutton / photo by Juana Ghersa

Through the lens of the body as a cross-cutting theme, the book examines gendered dimensions of experience during captivity and beyond. Sexual violence as a weapon of state terror is addressed, yet the book also shows more subtle dynamics of gender inscription through torture. Similarly, though the study attends to motherhood ideologies and the egregious treatment of pregnant women in captivity, it also explores women’s experiences beyond maternity. Public and scholarly discourse has tended to pay attention to the relatives of the people disappeared, particularly mothers; this book makes a needed contribution by bringing to the fore the stories of women who themselves were forcibly disappeared, but ultimately survived.

Surviving State Terror incorporates women survivors’ narratives of solidarity, resistance, and political organizing as well as their perspectives on social change, human rights, and democracy. The book draws on the urgent lessons that women survivors offer to a world that continues to grapple with atrocities. In the words of pioneering scholar of gender and militarization, Cynthia Enloe, the book “reveals how our listening to these women is crucial for sustainable democracy.” Distinguished sociologist Cecilia Menjívar adds that the “author masterfully reveals intersections of state terror and gender ideologies with clear relevance across space and time. A must read.”

Sponsored by the Department of Sociology; Center for the Study of Women in Society; Department of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies; and the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies.

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Tuesday, September 18th, 2018 Books, Events, Research No Comments

Josh Snodgrass, “Amazonians Offer Clues to Human Childhood Development”

Josh Snodgrass

A study of Shuar children in Ecuador provides a window into how the human body responds to infection in the sorts of conditions that shaped our species’ evolution.

Dr. Josh Snodgrass and Dr. Lawrence Sugiyama were featured in an article in The Scientist, entitled “Amazonians Offer Clues to Human Childhood Development,” about their research, the Shuar Health and Life History Project.

Click here to read the full article!

Lynn Stephen and Erin Beck among those to receive OVPRI 2018 Incubating Interdisciplinary Initiatives awards

Erin Beck & Lynn Stephen

July 16, 2018—Lynn Stephen and Erin Beck, two members of the CLLAS Executive Board, are among those whose research will receive 2018 Incubating Interdisciplinary Initiatives awards from the Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation. The program will award up to $50,000 to four UO research teams, described in an article in Around the O: UO researchers awarded grants for interdisciplinary projects

Lynn Stephen, founding director of CLLAS and professor of anthropology, and Erin Beck, associate professor of political science, were selected for “Gendered Justice: Addressing Violence Against Women in Guatemala and the U.S.”

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Tuesday, July 17th, 2018 Advisory Board, Awards, Funding, Research No Comments

Carlos Aguirre coedits new book of essays on the history of libraries in Latin America

Bibliotecas y cultura letrada en América Latina. Siglos XIX y XX
coedited by Carlos Aguirre and Ricardo D. Salvatore

(Lima: Pontificia Universidad Católica, 2018

Bibliotecas y cultura letrada en América Latina. Siglos XIX y XX—a new volume of essays coedited by UO history professor Carlos Aguirre—has just been published in Lima.

The essays in this volume shed light on the history of various types of libraries in Latin America and, in particular, their role in social and cultural conflicts, processes of nation-state formation, efforts towards bringing education and literacy to different types of populations, and the accumulation of cultural and symbolic capital. This volume seeks to contribute to the cultural and political history of libraries and lettered culture in the region and to open lines of conversation with other disciplines and forms of knowledge interested in the preservation of cultural patrimony, the circulation of knowledge, and the tensions and debates they generate. For more, go to Fondo Editorial

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Tuesday, July 10th, 2018 Advisory Board, Books, Research No Comments

Education professor Lauren M. Cycyk among first recipients of new UO-OHSU seed funding

Lauren Cycyk

Around the O / June 15, 2018—CLLAS-affiliated faculty Lauren M. Cycyk, assistant professor in Communication Disorders and Sciences in the UO College of Education, is among those announced as a recipient of the new UO-OHSU seed funding.

Cycyk was selected along with Katherine Zuckerman of OHSU for the project “Addressing Disparities in the Assessment and Treatment of Communication Disorders for Young Children from Latino Backgrounds.” 

Lewis Taylor, UO Communications, wrote for Around the O:

“Collaborative research teams examining everything from healthcare-associated infections to carbon nanotubes have been awarded funding to jump-start research projects as part of the 2018 OHSU-UO Collaborative Seed Grant program.

”Ten teams were chosen as part of the program, which creates new collaborations between researchers at Oregon Health & Science University and the University of Oregon.”

For the full story, go to “First recipients of new UO-OHSU seed funding announced.” 

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Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

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2017 Latino Roots Celebration

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