Roberto Zamora, “A Long Path: The Right to Peace”

May 30, 2019
7:00 pmto9:00 pm
Roberto Zamora

Lewis Lounge
Knight Law Center
1515 Agate St.
UO campus

Latin American Studies Event
Annual Bartolomé de las Casas Lecture on Human Rights in the Americas

“A Long Path: The Right to Peace”
Roberto Zamora, Human & Civil Rights Lawyer, Costa Rica

CLLAS 2019 Tinker & Research Grant Awardees

2019-2020 CLLAS Research Support

CLLAS recently announced the recipients of its 2019-20 Graduate Student Research Awards, Tinker Grants, Faculty Collaboration Grant, and Latinx Studies Seed Grant. They are as follows:

Graduate Student Research Grants

  • “Inner Exile in Formation and Sustenance of Racial, Sexual, and Gendered Communities in Chile and Argentina.” Jon Jaramillo, Romance Languages.
  • “The Politics of Seeking Shelter: Gender-Based Violence and the Right to Safety Among Low-Income Women in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.” Emily Masucci, Anthropology.
  • “Complicating Vulnerability: Gendered Disaster Narratives, Ice Loss, & Resilience in the Peruvian Cordillera Blanca.” Holly Moulton, Environmental Studies.

Faculty Collaboration Research Grant

  • “Oregon’s Water Future: Climate Change, Environmental Disasters, and Community Resilience.” Alai Reyes-Santos, Ethnic Studies, in collaboration with Oregon Environmental Council (OEC).

Second Year Latinx  Studies Seed Grant

  • “Decolonial Environmentalisms: Race, Genre, and Latinx Literature.”David Vazquez, English.

Third Year Tinker Foundation Grants

Tinker Field Research Grants are open to students across all academic disciplines and graduate degree programs to assist master’s and doctoral students with travel and field-related expenses for brief periods of field research in Latin America. Administered by CLLAS, the program is funded by the Tinker Foundation, with matching funds from CLLAS, the UO Office of Academic Affairs, and the Graduate School.

  • “Recalling Runaways: Studies of Slavery and Absenteeism in Cuba.” Aziza Baker, History. 
  • “Nepantleres: LGBTQ+ Migrants’ Transborder Experiences.” Polet Campos-Melchor, Anthropology.
  • “Transmission of Traditional Botanical Knowledge Among the Shuar of Amazonian Ecuador.” Sara Khatib, Anthropology.
  • “A Case Study of Two Guatemalan Organizations Demanding Justice for the 41 girls.” Carla Osorio Veliz, Geography. 
  • “Small-Scale Farmers’ Vulnerability to Climatic Changes in the Chinantec Region, Mexico.” Adriana Uscanga Castillo, Geography. 
  • “Electoral Revolutions: A Comparative Study of Rapid Changes in Electoral Participation.” Alberto Lioy, Political Science.   

CLLAS Research Series: Graduate Grantees

June 4, 2019
12:00 pmto1:30 pm

Knight Library, Browsing Room
1501 Kincaid St.
UO campus

Changing the Structures: Ending Gendered Violence in Guatemala & Promoting Scientific Diplomacy across the Americas

Moderator: Erin Beck
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science

  • Caitlin O’Quinn, Department of Political Science
    “Responses to Gendered Violence in Guatemala: How two women’s organizations are working to end violence against women and girls”
  • Lourdes Ginart, Department of Geography
    “Diplomacy and Global Change in the Americas”

2019-19 Dreamers Working Group Update

May 8, 2019—The Dreamers Working Group (DWG) includes staff, faculty, graduate students, and community members committed to creating a community of welcome and support for undocumented and Dreamer students, students with DACA, and students in mixed-status families. 

One way the DWG builds this support and community is through education and training outreach on the UO campus. Working in collaboration with CLLAS, UO professor Ellen McWhirter (counseling psychology) developed an hour-long info-session to build understanding of the realities faced by students with precarious status. DWG volunteers have led approximately 40 info-sessions since winter 2017, offering these educational opportunity units all over campus and beyond. Julie Weise, associate professor of history, created the Dreamers Ally Training initiative in fall 2017. Since then the DWG has held six robust, four-hour training sessions, training almost 400 staff, faculty, and graduate employees as allies. 

As director of Multicultural and Identity-based Support Services and chair of the DWG, Justine Carpenter focuses on direct student support and access and prioritizes student-facing work.  The successful Duck Funder campaign—and other fundraising activities that created a scholarship for undocumented & Dreamer students—has been at the center of this work.  Nine students received scholarships for spring 2019 and six to nine scholarships will be awarded for AY 2019-2020. The UO Dreamers webpage has also been reoriented toward student access and includes useful information on financial aid, scholarships, wellness, and student support and resources. 

The DWG is ready to build upon the foundation of volunteerism, ally membership, and administrative support to institutionalize strides taken in education, training and outreach for campus partners and access and advocacy for student success. New initiatives include: 1) community outreach to bridge the divide between campus and the Eugene-Springfield community; and 2) development of more effective legal support for undocumented and Dreamer students, students with DACA, and students from mixed-status families. The DWG has made progress toward the first goal of community outreach with a committee dedicated to connecting more effectively with community leaders and Eugene/Springfield school districts and libraries, and welcoming community members to campus more effectively with projects like creating a Spanish-language map of the UO, planning a community reception, and sharing the Latino Roots exhibit. 

The DWG needs the help of allies and experts in pursuit of the second goal of developing more effective legal support for our students, however. Please email feather@uoregon.edu to volunteer.   

— Feather Crawford, the CLLAS event & program coordinator, also works as a part-time coordinator for the Dreamers Working Group. 

National Park Service unit honors Stephanie Wood

Dr. Stephanie Wood (middle) stands on the bank of the Missouri River outside the National Park Service’s Midwest Regional office with Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Education Specialist, Tom Smith (left), and American Indian Liaison Alisha Deegan (right).

April 29, 2019— Stephanie Wood, research associate in the College of Education and studio instructor for the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, received the Outstanding Partner Award from a unit of the National Park Service called the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Wood is the University of Oregon’s principal investigator in the project Honoring Tribal Legacies, which aims to include indigenous perspectives in the classroom.

Stephanie Wood is a long-time CLLAS faculty affiliate.

Policy and Planning Trio Engages Diverse Communities

From Oregon Quarterly, April 3, 2019

In spring 2018, change came to the Bethel neighborhood in Eugene. Royal Elizabeth Park received a new name: Andrea Ortiz Park, after Eugene’s first Latina city councilor. Ortiz served from 2004 to 2012 and died in 2017.

“Naming a public space, like a park, after a Latina really sends a positive message of inclusion and belonging to the Latino community in Eugene,” says Gerardo Sandoval [CLLAS Executive Board member], an associate professor who specializes in community development in the School of Planning, Public Policy and Management (PPPM). “It’s a formal designation that recognizes the positive contributions Latinos are making in Oregon.”

Gerardo Sandoval
Gerardo Sandoval

The renaming followed years of outreach to the Latino community by Sandoval, a supporter of the city’s efforts to make parks more inclusive. Through the Latino Civic Participation Project, he led an initiative to involve low-income, marginalized groups in community development, public policy, and planning.

Sandoval will continue his outreach and research efforts with the new Access and Equity Research Group. The group includes José Meléndez, an expert in equitable public engagement and transformative learning who joined PPPM as an assistant professor in 2018; and John Arroyo, an MIT-trained urban planner who will arrive this fall after completing his Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship in Latino Studies at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe.

“One person dealing with diversity issues cannot address all of those,” Meléndez says. “We need multiple people addressing them.”

In addition to Latinos, the group will study underrepresented indigenous, Asian American, and African American communities, and will examine the links between communities and the design, planning, and management of public space. In particular, the group will focus on “participatory action research,” which emphasizes partnering with communities to solve problems.

“Many of us use qualitative methods that help elucidate stories and deeper context of the communities we research such as ethnography, in-depth interviews, oral histories, and content analysis of archival and current policy and legal documents,” Arroyo says.

José Meléndez and John Arroyo

Like Sandoval, Meléndez and Arroyo have worked with Latino communities. During his doctoral studies and then as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Meléndez investigated the budgeting process in the city’s 49th Ward, finding that Spanish-speaking Latino immigrants struggled to participate due to a language barrier. He partnered with the community to create a Spanish language committee that significantly increased and sustained the participation of its members in civic decision-making.

As a fellow, Arroyo is studying Latino immigrants with his first book project, Shadow Suburbanism: Mexican Everyday Life, Fear, and Space in Greater Atlanta. He is analyzing how Mexican immigrants reshape their suburban environments despite rising anti-immigration policies that distress one of the South’s fastest growing populations.

Meléndez and Arroyo will also continue their research and outreach to Latino communities in Oregon, where that population is growing rapidly. According to the Latino Civic Participation Project, Latinos now make up 14 percent of the state population and 20 percent of the K–12 population.

Says Arroyo: “People don’t realize Oregon is a microcosm of national issues—rural poverty, urban income disparities, influxes of migration, and indigenous and small-city planning and infrastructure.”

—By Alex Cipolle, MA ‘11 (journalism), College of Design




Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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