Study Reveals Covid-19’s Long-Term Impacts and Existing Inequalities on Oregon Farmworkers Are Pervasive and Deleterious

Results of Statewide Farmworker Survey Are Now Available

Portland, Oregon — The Oregon COVID-19 Farmworker Study Team (a consortium of 11 farmworker-serving organizations and academics from Portland State University, University of Oregon, and Oregon State University) announces the survey findings from 300 farmworkers living across the state of Oregon. Final results from a survey of 300 Oregonian farmworkers document just how pervasive and deleterious the COVID-19 global pandemic continues to be on farmworkers and their families (in Oregon, the United States, and abroad). This study provides the first state-wide picture of the impact of COVID-19 on the work, home lives, and transnational connections of Oregon farmworkers. Results from this unique study—the only cross-state survey to gather data directly from farmworkers working through COVID-19—are now publicly available.

On June 26, Oregon’s unprecedented heatwave claimed the life of Indigenous Chuj farmworker Sebastián Francisco Pérez from Guatemala, adding to the list of extreme weather events that place farmworkers deemed “essential” on the climate crisis’s frontlines. The COVID-19 global pandemic, exacerbated by unprecedented wildfires, excessive heat, and other extreme weather events in Oregon, demonstrates that farmworkers continue working in worsening and already hazardous conditions to put food on our tables. These events highlight the importance of strengthening farmworker protections in and out of the workplace. This moment requires cross-governmental and community-based support for recovery, equitable vaccine distribution, information and programs accessible in Indigenous languages spoken in the state (not just Spanish), and increased enforcement of farmworker safety standards and labor rights.

The state’s farmworker population as a group, a majority of whom are Latino/a/x or Indigenous peoples from Mexico and Guatemala, experienced disproportionately higher rates of COVID-19 infections than people from other ethnic backgrounds and labor sectors. Many face economic, social, physical, and mental health challenges without adequate safety nets and protections. The impacts have not been equal across gender, Indigeneity, and language. Despite barriers, farmworkers continue to remain connected to their homelands. They used mutual aid, family, and community networks to maneuver through the pandemic. However, recovering from the pandemic requires immediate and deliberate attention to farmworkers’ safety and well-being at work and home. 

Read the full report here.

2021 CLLAS Notes Part 2

Graduate Research Reports

Lola Loustaunau and Polet Campos-Melchor each received a 2020 CLLAS Summer Research Grant.

From Disposability to Collective Care: Experiences of Migrant Essential Workers during the COVID-19 Pandemic

By Lola Loustaunau, PhD candidate, Department of Sociology

Fruit packing workers organized in the independent union Trabajadores Unidos por la Justicia pose with researcher Lola Loustaunau after holding a vaccination event at their new union local, Yakima, WA, April 2021.

At the time I was about to begin the field work for my dissertation, COVID-19 became a worldwide pandemic. The workers whose experiences are the focus of my research—migrant women employed in the industrial processing of food including fruit, vegetables, meat, and baked goods—suddenly made national headlines as their workplaces became sites of some of the biggest virus outbreaks. As their situation rapidly changed, so did my own work: the research questions, the data collection methods, and my goals as an activist-scholar.

Working conditions in the food processing industry have historically been poor: long and physically demanding workdays, unpredictable schedules, low wages, and the highest accident rate in manufacturing. As outbreaks led to spikes in the number of infected workers (Dyal 2020; Lakhani 2020; Taylor, Boulos, and Almond 2020), industry and government responded by attempting to maintain the status quo, further deregulating the sector and failing to mandate any protections against outbreaks or infections (Commissioner of Food and Drugs – 2020; Memorandum United States Environmental Protection Agency, 2020; Executive Order 13917 2020).   

Food processing workers soon realized that while their work was essential, they were not. Expected to continue working with little or no protective gear, they faced increased workplace risks, new caregiving responsibilities at home, and limited access to public support or healthcare.

It was at this time that workers started organizing. Conversations on the processing line soon turned into Facebook groups and Whatsapp chats as a platform to share information about the virus, about who was getting sick, what the plant managers were doing or saying, about how to navigate a fragmented benefit system that was ill prepared to aid workers during this crisis. Workers reached out to organizations, advocates, and journalists.

Family members got involved: wives and husbands worried about their partners, young teens worried about their non-English speaking parents, neighbors worried about each other. I soon found myself joining these conversations, going to Zoom meetings with other advocates and organizers, and trying to figure out what my role as a researcher could be. While hesitant at first, I quickly understood that registering the workers’ experiences and their organizing efforts was important not only as part of a broader discussion on the U.S. food supply chain, but because helping workers to get their stories out could have immediate impacts on their situation.

Vegetable processing workers rally outside Twin City Foods, in Pasco, WA, demanding protections and hazard pay, October 2020.

Certainly, doing research during the COVID-19 outbreak had great challenges. For safety reasons I couldn’t do in-person actions with the workers until October; yet in the months prior, I spent most of my time trying to get in touch with workers and organizers, doing phone interviews, and collecting online data. Unlike my previous experiences doing qualitative research, this time around things were put together remotely.

By the time I was able to travel to the sites where most of the organizing was happening, I had established closer relations with some workers and organizations, so my work focused on expanding those connections. I participated in rallies and community forums, went to workers’ homes and met their families, attended testing events, and volunteered at vaccination clinics. I loaned my translation skills and transferred resources from the university to these communities by compensating workers for their time spent collaborating on my research. Instead of focusing on writing an academic article or a chapter, I prioritized putting together a public policy oriented report, which became the basis of my testimony at the Washington State Legislature when the food industry’s pandemic response was under discussion, and which I later presented alongside many of the workers over Zoom.

I found that discourses about essential work did not necessarily translate into making workers feel like heroes, but actually quite the opposite, with many expressing that they felt “disposable.” However, I also found that workers translated this feeling of disposability into an opportunity to struggle for better working conditions and to build new and expansive communities of care.

Workers at Allan Bros in Yakima create an altar for a co-worker who died due to COVID-19, November 2020.

Through my research I captured how workers at different plants experimented with different forms of resistance and organizing: from creating online groups to help each other apply for benefits, to massively walking out of their jobs, to striking for several weeks, to starting their own unions or joining existing ones. Workers built spaces for mourning their co-workers and processing the loss they were collectively experiencing. They helped each other by making and sharing masks and hand sanitizer, preparing food, and coordinating pop-up vaccination clinics and know-your-rights’ trainings. They expanded their networks and built alliances with farmworkers, grocery workers, and multiple community organizations. In so doing, food processing migrant workers reverted the feelings of disposability, fear, and anger brought by the employer’s response during the pandemic and created spaces of collective care. These actions also brought new emotions, this time allowing workers to feel strong, beautiful, energized, and excited.  

Based on this insight, in my dissertation I argue that unpacking the affective dimension of their working conditions and their collective organizing allows for seeing how these workers turned fear and anger into courage, and how they defied the structural oppression that had rendered them disposable. By highlighting the emotional dimension both of disposability and the struggle against it, we are able to gain a deeper understanding of what the past year has been for these workers in the front lines and how they have struggled, and continue to struggle, for their survival and the survival of their communities.

Lola Loustaunau is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Sociology. Her research focuses on precarity, low-wage migrant workers, emotions, and collective organizing. She has received several awards for her dissertation work and will be a Wayne Morse Graduate Fellow for AY 2021-2022. She has recently co-authored: ‘No choice but to be essential: expanding dimensions of precarity during the COVID-19’ (Sociological Perspectives, 2021) and ‘Impossible choices: how workers manage unpredictable scheduling practices’ (Labor Studies Journal 2019). For a longer report on her work, “Essential Work, Disposable Workers.


Reciprocity in Conducting Fieldwork in Ciudad Juárez

by Polet Campos-Melchor, PhD Student, Department of Anthropology

After my 2019 summer fieldwork at Respetttrans, a trans asylum seeker shelter in Ciudad Juárez, I was inspired to return in summer 2020 to create a lotería with the community and a transfronteriza artist. The pandemic made the return impossible. While my summer 2019 fieldwork examined trans asylum seekers’ practices of care and mutual aid during their experience with the Remain in Mexico Policy in Ciudad Juarez, my 2020 summer fieldwork was set to document the lives of trans asylum seekers being celebrated in Juárez. With the support of the Center for Latino/a & Latin American Studies, I was able to finalize transcription from my 2019 research and conduct ten follow-up interviews with my interlocutors. This resulted in my master’s paper, submitted to the Department of Anthropology and approved in December 2020. In this newsletter post, I share an introduction to my 2019 summer fieldwork and how the lessons moved across borders and relations.

About a week into my fieldwork in Juárez, I met Grecia, a mother and nurse and the Rarámuri and Mennonite “mother” of Respetttrans. I had walked through Calle Hospital’s streets with Dr. Yolanda Leyva and Gabriela Muñoz, arriving at a bright pink house with a rainbow and trans flag hanging from the roof. This was Respetttrans, where Grecia had been awaiting our arrival. A tall, pale woman with nineties-style rolled bangs and warm brown eyes, Grecia welcomed us into the space. An active member of the LGBT community in Ciudad Juárez, Grecia told us that her goal is to keep LGBTQ+ migrants off the streets and get them into homes where they feel safe and welcome.

Two shelter members shape each others’ eyebrows. Next to them are the photos of Joha and Fiorela (captioned “No más muertes en el ICE (No moredeaths in ICE). Respetttrans-Ciudad Juárez, 2019.

By working towards building a reciprocal relationship with the LGBT+ community in Ciudad Juárez, I set my intentions on working closely with Respetttrans. Along with this feeling of caring for the house members came the responsibility of returning. After my first visit, I was tasked with bringing back items for the house members. Grecia asked for a new set of clothes for Leslie, a recent deportee, as well as a change of clothes for the two young boys of the house. Wily, a gay boy, also asked for a soccer ball. Two days later, I returned with all the items. One of the women was surprised that I had returned; she said reporters and other visitors do not.

Respetttrans is and continues to be a site that is frequented by nonprofits and government agencies who ask the residents about their struggles and repay them with a meal for their stories. There was a case when representatives from three different organizations arrived at the house on the same day. Community members said they felt like the house was a zoo and they were the animals. Although the girls joked, the sincerity in their eyes showed that they were hurt.

In another case in mid-August, I witnessed first-hand how rare it was for the autonomy or consent of migrants to be acknowledged. I was sitting in the living room with Courtney, Michele, Leslie, Minerva, Aneliz, and Andrés talking about foods we missed from home. Courtney was lying on one of the couches, closely watching Pose on my phone. Andrés continued to bring up chicken gizzards. When three guests entered with Grecia, we suddenly found ourselves in a group interview. The visitors were from an organization in the United States and were looking to fund spaces in Ciudad Juárez. I noted that consent for an interview had not been sought but presumed.

After that particular witnessing of the lack of consent or care given to the house members, I began to take photos of them on my polaroid to provide them with immediate copies. The women would pose, take pictures of each other with my camera, and then use the photos to decorate their living spaces. As I continued to visit them, I learned that collaborative relationships in the field require care and mutual support that center celebrating queer lives in the present.

Polet Campos-Melchor is a PhD student in the Department of Anthropology and Graduate Certificate student in the Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Oregon. Her research explores how trans and lesbian migrants and scholars articulate and narrate strategies of love and care, expanding beyond only the imaginary into tangible strategies of survival. Polet is also a UO Promising Scholar. Her research has been funded by the Tinker Foundation, the UO Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies, and the UO Center for the Study of Women in Society.

________________________________________________________________________________________________

Editor’s Note: Spring 2021 CLLAS Notes Part 3 will be posted later this summer.

Let Families and Communities Seek Asylum Together

Article by CLLAS Executive Board Member and Founding Director, Lynn Stephen

Art at the border, Public Books

As of June 1, 2021, there were 1,306,772 backlogged cases in US Immigration Courts, with an average wait time of 938 days, or 2.56 years, according to the Syracuse University Trac immigration project. The nation with the largest number of cases is Guatemala, with 287,097, followed by Honduras, with 251,795. Among these pending immigration cases are a large number of asylum cases. What is asylum? Why would it take so long? Why would Guatemala and Honduras top the list? And can we rethink what asylum is?

To read more, please find this piece on Public Books.

2021 CLLAS Notes Part 1

Editor’s note: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we’ve published our newsletter exclusively online for another edition. This is the first of three newsletter installments to be published over the next several weeks.

Gabriela Martínez

Director’s Letter
by Gabriela Martínez, CLLAS Director;
Professor, School of Journalism and Communication

This year has been unusual, yet productive and busy for CLLAS. The global pandemic made us shift gears, but it didn’t stop us from carrying out 14 scholarly and creative events and activities. In this letter I will only highlight a few of them. CLLAS also continued its support to graduate students and faculty through what were difficult times for conducting research. 

This was the second and concluding year of our 2019-2021 theme The Politics of Language in the Americas: Power, Culture, History, and Resistance. We got off to a great start addressing the 2020 election cycle with an event focused on the election and the Latinx Community through a public conversation with the executive director of CAPACES Leadership Institute, Jaime Arredondo.  

CLLAS celebrated Latinx Heritage Month in October. Award-winning filmmaker Alex Rivera delivered the CLLAS Distinguished Lecture, entitled The Border as a Way of Seeing. He also led a teach-in where students and other attendees collectively produced a short film about immigration and the border.

CLLAS hosted a successful symposium marking the culmination of our two-year theme. This two-day series of events — Languages on the Move: Linguistic Diaspora, Indigeneity, and Politics in the Americas — included three panels, a keynote address, and several musical performances. You can immerse yourself in the symposium through our symposium videos. I am grateful to our symposium organizers, associate professors Monique Balbuena (Comp Lit), Audrey Lucero (College of Ed), and Gabriela Pérez Báez (Linguistics).  

CLLAS organized a celebration for the launching of the new Latinx Studies minor, headed by CLLAS board member and associate professor Audrey Lucero (College of Ed).

CLLAS closed this academic year by launching a new initiative to further engage UO’s undergraduate student population: Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Project. This Award recognizes undergraduate excellent work in a variety of disciplines where they cover Latinx and Latin American social, cultural, and/or political issues. First year CLLAS Undergraduate Award Recipients are: Emily Chavez Romero – Latino Roots Film: Dreams that Cross BordersThomas Parker – Research Paper: Wild Tales; Caitlin Scott – Honor’s Thesis: Reinforcing Push Factors in the Northern Triangle: An Investigation of Trump’s Attempts to Deter Immigration through Humanitarian Aid Reduction; Eva Shannon – Art Cover: La cena miserable, Eduardo Kingman, Ecuador. CLLAS Undergraduate Award Honorable Mentions are: Taylor Henry – Art Cover: Manos de la protesta, Oswaldo Guayamin, Ecuador; Adrianna Vaca-Navarro – Honor’s Thesis: Chapter on immigration and border imperialism.

In addition to the highlights mentioned above CLLAS also hosted its yearly ongoing Graduate Colloquium and Faculty Grantees Research Presentations. 

CLLAS’s next two-year theme 2021-2023 will be Human and Environmental Crises in the Americas. 

Finally, I want to take this opportunity to say how much CLLAS has enriched my academic and professional life during the years that I have been directing it. I am stepping away from the directorship at the end of June 2021. During my tenure, CLLAS solidified and expanded its presence throughout campus, strengthened its community outreach throughout the state of Oregon, and continued successfully its support to students and faculty bridging Latinx and Latin American Studies. I feel honored to have served as director of this important Center, which has a bright future if the UO administration has the vision and willingness to support its growth. I hope that is the case. 

I’m grateful to all of the CLLAS staff, graduate employees, and student workers who worked during my time as director. I want to acknowledge their outstanding work and commitment to everything CLLAS stands for. I would like specially to thank Eli Meyer, Director of Operations; Feather Crawford, Event Coordinator; Christine Waite, Accountant; and last but not least, Alice Evans, our former Communications Specialist. They all have been excellent to work with, and I feel lucky to have had them as my team. I also want to thank all of my colleagues who served at different moments on the executive board. Their commitment to CLLAS and their advice and contributions helped me enormously as director and strengthened the CLLAS research and programmatic agenda over the years. In particular, I would like to thank executive board members and dear colleagues Lynn Stephen (anthropology) and Carlos Aguirre (history) for their unwavering support and mentorship.

Wishing everyone a wonderful summer!

Welcome to Our Next CLLAS Director 

Chris Chávez

I am pleased to welcome the next CLLAS Director, Dr. Chris Chávez. Chris Chávez is professor of Media Studies, Advertising, and Latinx Studies, tenured in the School of Journalism and Communication. He has been involved with CLLAS since he joined the UO in 2013, serving a three-year term as member of the executive board and actively participating in CLLAS research and programming activities. I am sure Chris will further strengthen and expand the significant work the center does on campus and extramural. I am happy to leave the CLLAS in such good hands! 

—Gabriela Martínez, Outgoing Director


Faculty Research

Visual Lexicon of Aztec Hieroglyphs

By Stephanie Wood, Center for Equity Promotion, College of Education

Forms of human expression have long been at the heart of research in the Humanities. Who adopted writing systems—from Mesopotamia to Mesoamerica—-along with explorations of when, where, why, and how, have captured the imagination of scholars for centuries. Yet, many questions remain and cry out for new attention. Maya hieroglyphs, in all their beautiful, three-dimensional, and lengthy texts have received much more attention than Aztec glyphs. 

CLLAS funding has underwritten work on the prototype of a digital collection of Aztec glyphs that will help advance scholars’ understanding of this unique, early writing system and provide a tool for the decipherment of unpublished manuscripts that feature such glyphs. Examples of Aztec hieroglyphic writing do appear on monuments and artifacts that have survived from pre-Columbian times, proving that it existed as a phonetic system prior to contact, but surviving manuscripts that employ a vast number of glyphs are either partially or entirely from post-contact times. For those interested in the revitalization of indigenous languages and in accessing Native points of view about settler colonialism, this body of material offers rich rewards. 

Wonderfully, hieroglyphic writing that is based on the Nahuatl language lived on for generations after the Spanish invaded and seized power five hundred years ago (1521). Dozens or hundreds of manuscripts painted across the sixteenth century by Nahua scribes —even as they also learned to write in Nahuatl using the imported Roman alphabet—remain to be carefully analyzed. If funding can now be obtained from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Visual Lexicon will incorporate thousands of glyphs from a number of manuscripts, such as the Codex Mendoza (from Mexico City, with two examples shown here), the Codex Xolotl (from Tetzcoco), and the Matrícula de Huexotzinco (Puebla). This image data set will facilitate not only an improved and expanded decipherment capability, but also a greater appreciation of the genius of Nahua literacy and its cultural expressions. 


CLLAS News & Updates

Michelle McKinley, Bernard B. Kliks Professor of Law at the UO Law School, received the Provost Senior Humanist Award at the Oregon Humanities Center for Fall 2021, as well as a residential fellowship at the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University. Professor McKinley also received a research grant from the American Philosophical Society. All these are for her new project: “Bound Biographies: Transoceanic Itineraries and the Afro-Iberian Diaspora in the Americas, 1550-1750.”

Isabel Millán, Assistant Professor, Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, was awarded a Woodrow Wilson Career Enhancement Fellowship for the upcoming 2021-2022 academic year.

Lynn Stephen, Phillip H. Knight Chair, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences Department of Anthropology, won the 2020-2021 publication prize of the LASA Expert Witness Section for her article “Fleeing rural violence: Mam women seeking gendered justice in Guatemala and the U.S.,” published in the Journal of Peasant Studies, in 2019. It is one of the pieces Stephen wrote specifically to build an argument to help in gendered asylum cases.


Book Publications

Carlos Aguirre, Professor, Department of History.  Alberto Flores Galindo. Utopía, historia y revolución (Lima, La Siniestra Ensayos, 2020), coauthored with Charles Walker, University of California, Davis. The book addresses different aspects of the work and life of the late Marxist Peruvian historian Alberto Flores Galindo (1949-1990), including his role as a public intellectual, his views about Peruvian independence, his interpretations of political violence in the 1980s, his relationship with the Cuban revolution, and the way in which his passion for literature infused his work as a historian.

Amalia Gladhart

Amalia Gladhart, Professor of Spanish, Dept. of Romance Languages: Her translation of Jaguars’ Tomb, a novel by Argentine writer Angélica Gorodischer, was published in Feb. 2021 by Vanderbilt UP.

Abstract: Jaguars’ Tomb is a novel in three parts, written by three interconnected characters. Each of the three parts revolves around the octagonal room that is alternately the jaguars’ tomb, the central space of the torture center, and the heart of an abandoned house that hides an adulterous affair. The novel is both an intriguing puzzle and a meditation on how to write about, or through, violence, injustice and loss. Among Gorodischer’s many novels, Jaguars’ Tomb most directly addresses the abductions and disappearances that occurred under the Argentine military dictatorship of 1976–83.

Michelle McKinley, Bernard B. Kliks Professor of Law at the University of Oregon Law School. Her award-winning book Fractional Freedoms has been translated into Spanish. The citation is Libertades Fraccionadas: esclavitud, intimidad y movilización jurídica en la Lima colonial, 1600-1700. Valencia: Editorial Tirant lo blanch, 2021. Fractional Freedoms explores how thousands of slaves in colonial Peru were able to secure their freedom, keep their families intact, negotiate lower self-purchase prices, and arrange transfers of ownership by filing legal claims. Through extensive archival research, Michelle A. McKinley excavates the experiences of enslaved women whose historical footprint is barely visible in the official record.

Lynn Stephen, Phillip H. Knight Chair, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences Department of Anthropology. Indigenous Women and Violence: Feminist Activist Research in Heightened States of Injustice. Lynn Stephen (Editor), Shannon Speed (Editor). Indigenous Women and Violence offers an intimate view of how settler colonialism and other structural forms of power and inequality created accumulated violences in the lives of Indigenous women. This volume uncovers how these Indigenous women resist violence in Mexico, Central America, and the United States, centering on the topics of femicide, immigration, human rights violations, the criminal justice system, and Indigenous justice. Taking on the issues of our times, Indigenous Women and Violence calls for the deepening of collaborative ethnographies through community engagement and performing research as an embodied experience. This book brings together settler colonialism, feminist ethnography, collaborative and activist ethnography, emotional communities, and standpoint research to look at the links between structural, extreme, and everyday violences across time and space. 


Journal and Book Chapter Publications

  • Amalia Gladhart, Professor of Spanish, Dept. of Romance Languages; Her short story “Misdirection” (set in the Andes) appears in The Common 21. 
  • Audrey Lucero, Associate Professor, Department of Education Studies Director, Critical & Sociocultural Studies program Director, Latinx Studies Program:
    Lucero, A., Bermúdez, B., Mitteis, M. (forthcoming). Crossing borders: The perspectives of transnational students in one Oregon high school. In R. Bussell (Ed.), A state of immigrants: New research on the immigrant experience in Oregon. Eugene, OR: University of Oregon. 
    Lucero, A., Donley, K., Bermudez Bonilla, B. (in press). 
    Holguin, C.M., Romero Montaño, L., Lucero, A., Dorantes, A., Taylor, A. (in press). Too Latinx or not Latinx enough? Racial subtexts and subjectivities at a predominantly white university. Journal of Latinos and Education. 
  • Michelle McKinley, Bernard B. Kliks Professor of Law at the University of Oregon Law School, “Juana de Godinez,” published in Freedom in Degrees: A Collective Biography of Black Women and Emancipation in the Americas, Tatiana Seijas, Terri Snyder and Erica Ball eds. Cambridge University Press, 2020, pp.110-128. 
  • Bronwen K. Maxson, MLIS, Coordinator, Undergraduate Engagement & Instructional Services Subject Specialist for Latin American Studies, Spanish & Portuguese:
    Hicks, A., Maxson, B. K., & Reyes, B. M. (in press). “Hay muchos Méxicos”: A new approach to designing international information literacy instruction opportunities. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 21(3). https://scholarsbank.uoregon.edu/xmlui/handle/1794/25841 
  • Jessica Vasquez-Tokos, Department of Sociology, & Priscilla Yamin, Department of Political Science. The racialization of privacy: racial formation as a family affair Accepted: 7 December 2020/  Springer Nature B.V. part of Springer Nature 2021. https://rdcu.be/cms2d
  • Lesley Jo Weaver, Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies Department of Global (International) Studies:
    2021 Weaver, Lesley Jo, Nicole Henderson, and Craig Hadley. The Social Meaning of Food Consumption Behaviors in Rural Brazil: Agreement and Intracultural Variation. Field Methods 33(4). https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1525822X21992162

________________________________________________________________________________________________

Editor’s Note: Spring 2021 CLLAS Notes Parts 2 and 3 will be posted later this summer.

2021 CLLAS Graduate & Faculty Grant Recipients

CLLAS announces its 2021-22 graduate and faculty grant recipients. They are:

Graduate Grant Recipients

Summer Research Grant Awards

  • Marina Penalosa (Romance Languages)
    An Intellectual Field in Tension. The Other Borges
  • David Peña (School of Art and Design)
    Ecotone

Field Research Grants in Latin America

  • Alejandra Pedraza (Global Studies)
    Womanhood, remittances, and COVID-19: Insights from a migrant-sending community in rural Mexico
  • Elizabeth Sotelo (Romance Languages)
    Beyond Gender: Inequalities and Invisibilities Among Female Literary Chroniclers in Peru and Mexico
  • Magela Baudoin (Romance Languages)
    Poetry and Popular Song in Matilde Casazola and Violeta Parra: The Journey of the Seed
  • Marena Lear (Comparative Literature)
    Revolutionizing the Revolution: Cuban New Media and Independent Cinema

Faculty Awards

Faculty Latinx Studies Seed Grant

  • Daniel Gómez Steinhart (Cinema Studies)
    Cross-Border Hollywood: Production Politics and Practices in Mexico

Faculty Research Seed Grant

  • Maria Fernanda Escallón (Anthropology)
    “Becoming Heritage: Recognition, Exclusion, and the Politics of Black Cultural Heritage in Colombia”

Watch the CLLAS Symposium

The 2021 CLLAS Symposium, Languages on the Move: Linguistic Diaspora, Indigeneity, and Politics in the Americas, was a great success! Recordings of each symposium session are now available. If you were unable to participate or want to watch your favorite session again, please find the panels, keynote address, and musical presentation linked below.

Panel One, Translational Research with and for Indigenous Language Communities

Keynote Address, Saberes Ancestrales, Arte y Mujeres Indígenas/Ancestral Knowledge, Art and Indigenous Women

Panel Two, Jewish Americas: The Many Diasporas and their Languages

Panel Three, Graduate Research Showcase on Linguistic Diasporas

Musical Presentations: Una Isu and Hip Hop Hoodíos




Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

Search

 

Upcoming Events

  • No events.

CLLAS Common Reading Brunch with author Helena María Viramontes / Photos by Mike Bragg / Courtesy of the UO Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

Categories