Why are the Migrants Fleeing Honduras?

April 10, 2019
4:00 pmto5:30 pm

Knight Library, Browsing Room, 1501 Kincaid St., UO campus

“Why are the Migrants Fleeing Honduras? Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup”

Speaker: Dana Frank
Professor of History Emerita
University of California, Santa Cruz

In this presentation Dana Frank will discuss her new book, The Long Honduran Night: Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup, which examines Honduras since the 2009 coup that deposed democratically-elected President Manuel Zelaya. In the book, she interweaves her personal experiences in post-coup Honduras and in the US Congress with a larger analysis of the coup regime and its ongoing repression, Honduran opposition movements, US policy in support of the regime, and Congressional challenges to that policy. Her book helps us understand the root causes of the immigrant caravans of Hondurans leaving for the US, and the destructive impact of US policy.

Dana Frank is Professor of History Emerita  at the University of California, Santa Cruz.  Herbooks include Bananeras: Women Transforming the Banana Unions of Latin America, which focuses on Honduras, and Buy American: The Untold Story of Economic Nationalism.  Her writings on human rights and U.S. policy in post-coup Honduras have appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Miami Herald, Houston Chronicle, The Nation, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Politico Magazine,  and many other publications, and she has been interviewed by the Washington Post, New Yorker, New York Times, National Public Radio, Univsion, Latino USAregularly on Democracy Now!and on other outlets.  Professor Frank  has testified about Honduras before the US House of Representatives, the California Assembly, and the Canadian Parliament.

“Visual Clave” CLLAS Research Series: Faculty Collaboration Research Grant

April 11, 2019
3:30 pmto5:00 pm

Ford Lecture Hall
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)
1430 Johnson Lane
University of Oregon campus

CLLAS Research Series: Faculty Collaboration Research Grant

“Visual Clave: The Expression of the Latino/a Experience Through Album Cover Art: 1940-1990” 

presented by Philip Scher, Anthropology, and Cheryl Hartup, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

Visual Clave is organized by Philip W. Scher, UO Professor of Anthropology and Folklore and Public Culture and Divisional Dean for Social Sciences, and Pablo E. Yglesias, a Northampton, MA-based Cuban-American researcher, writer, musician, artist, and DJ. An expanded version of the exhibition was on view previously at the Student Union Art Gallery at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst; the Bronx Music Heritage Center, NY; and Picture Farm Gallery, Brooklyn, NY. Visual Clave takes its inspiration and intellectual structure from Yglesias’ book Cocinando: 50 Years of Latin Album Cover Art (Princeton Architectural Press, 2005). The exhibition is supported by UO’s College of Arts and Sciences, the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS), and a JSMA Academic Support Grant.

All album covers reproduced courtesy of their respective record labels.

The talk is at 3:30 p.m. on April 11 in the Ford Lecture Hall at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art. 1430 Johnson Lane, University of Oregon campus. jsma.uoregon.edu 541.346.3027

CLLAS Faculty Research Grants deadline

April 5, 2019
12:00 pm
Faculty Research Grants: Deadline April 5, 2019
CLLAS offers both Faculty Collaborative Research Grants and the Faculty Latinx Studies Seed Grant. Application deadline for faculty grants is: 12:00 p.m. (noon), Friday, April 5, 2019.

CLLAS Research Series: Graduate Grantees

April 23, 2019
12:00 pmto1:30 pm
1:45 pmto3:15 pm

Knight Library
Browsing Room
1501 Kincaid St.

CLLAS Research Series: Graduate Grantees

Session I: Environmental Justice, Migration & Labor: Local/Global Implications

12-1:30pm

Holly Moulton, Environmental Studies
Environmental Justice and the Local Effects of Glacier Melt: A Case Study in the Peruvian Cordillera Huayhuash

 Diego Contreras, Sociology
Migration Industry in Oregon: How Contractors Define Living and Labor Conditions of Farmworkers

 ~coffee break

 Session II: Identity, Labor & Agency in Chichén Itzá and the Bolivian Lowlands

1:45-3:15pm

Sofia Vidal, Anthropology
Indigenous Maya Labor in the World Heritage Site of Chichén Itzá

 Maria Pomes Lorences, International Studies
Indigeneity and Mobilization: ¿How do Collective Identities of Lowland Indigenous Nations in Bolivia Influence their Strategies to Implement their Right to Self-Determination and Cultural Promotion?

UO Dreamer Ally Training

April 26, 2019
1:00 pmto5:00 pm
May 24, 2019
9:00 amto1:00 pm

Registration for Spring Dreamer Ally Trainings is now open.

To register, please scroll to the bottom of the UO Dreamers website; under faculty and staff resources you will see buttons to register for the April and May trainings.

UO Dreamer Ally Training, Friday, April 26, 2019

1 pm-5pm (lunch included during registration at 12:30pm)

*We cannot accommodate partial attendance, please plan on staying for the entire workshop.

UO Dreamer Ally Training, Friday, May 24, 2019

9 am – 1pm (lunch included, coffee available during registration at 8:30 am)

*We cannot accommodate partial attendance, please plan on staying for the entire workshop.

At this training, faculty, staff & GEs will:

  • Explore the unique challenges facing students at the University of Oregon whose immigrant legal status is precarious or unresolved
  • Review the basic laws and policies affecting these students
  • Learn about appropriate referral resources
  • Learn what you should do if immigration enforcement come to campus
  • Receive guidance on how to effectively support Dreamer and undocumented students and identify one or more positive changes that you and your unit start working on right now

After completing the entire four-hour training, participants will have the opportunity to sign a pledge of confidentiality and support, and receive a sign and pin designating them a “Dreamer Ally.”

*We apologize that we cannot accommodate partial attendance at the training; all four hours are required of all participants. To schedule a shorter, one-hour info session, please see scroll to the bottom of the https://www.uoregon.edu/dreamers  website and click the “Request a Dreamer Info Session” button.  

For more information, please email uodreamers@uoregon.edu.

Latinx album covers invite people to look at art in a new way

https://around.uoregon.edu/content/latinx-album-covers-invite-people-look-art-new-way

From Around the O / March 4, 2019—Music and art have long-shared a history of collaboration, from turn-of-the-century sheet music illustrations to the vibrant psychedelic album cover designs of the trippy ’60s and beyond.

A slice of that history has makes up the visual artistry of Latinx artists, who are the subject of an interactive exhibition at the UO’s Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art titled “Visual Clave: The Expression of the Latino/a Experience through Album Cover Art: 1940-90.” The installation features 40-50 original album covers that are, in some cases, paired with the original artwork that was created to produce the album cover.

The inspiration for the exhibit, and the culmination of more than a decade of research and collecting, is the 2005 book “Cocinando: 50 Years of Latin Album Cover Art”by Northampton, Massachusetts-based Cuban-American author, musician and artist Pablo Ygnasio. The result is a pared-down selection culled from a larger East Coast show that distills the essence of the Latinx experience in its many forms.

The co-curator of the exhibit is Phillip Scher, UO professor of anthropology and folklore and public culture and also divisional dean for social sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences. Scher has collaborated with Ygnasio on projects since their college days together and explained that although the work is certainly diverse, much of what was produced for the mass market in the early days was largely controlled by big music industry companies like RCA, Decca and Capitol Records.

“Record producers and record labels understood the popularity of popular music — there had been a big mambo craze — they understood that it sold records, but they were still largely controlling the recording marketing and distribution process,” Scher said. “The artists might have been contracted, who themselves may not have been from the (Latinx) community.”

The exhibit hall

That began to change, however, in the 1960s and ’70s as Latin American musicians and emergent independent record labels such as Faniabegan to hand over more control to the musicians as well as to the artists who designed the cover art.

That also meant taking control of the messaging.

Latinx artists not only used albums as an outlet to express themselves artistically but also oftentimes as a means of conveying provocative commentary on Hispanic topics of resistance or issues of a political, economic or cultural nature.

“You begin to see covers themselves reflecting more of what the musicians want to say about their music, their community, their relationship to the American experience,” Scher said. “There’s a variety of ways in which taking control of the process of production yields really different artwork.”

Indeed, the exhibition, which is grouped by themes, embraces everything from dance and food, “Spanglish”, lowriders and borders, and life in the barrio to protest, resistance and spirituality, to name a few. A section celebrating female artists provides imagery and context to those strong Latinas who persevered, despite pressure to “stay out of the macho world of salsa and ranchera” and to not speak to women’s issues and perspectives.

Likewise, a 1971 Izzy Sanabria album cover designed for the iconic Willie Colónrecord “La Gran Fuga/The Big Break”, also known as the “Wanted by the FBI,” features a mug shot of Colón and uses satire to break negative stereotypes of the “bad Latino.” That includes humorous quotes such as “armed with a trombone and considered dangerous” and “Occupation: singer, also a very dangerous man with his voice.” Ironically, Colón went on to a career in law enforcement.

Although it’s not featured in this grouping, Scher cited an example of subtle messaging in popular crossover musician Desi Arnaz’ album Babalú. It’s unlikely that the predominently Anglo-American audience tuning in to the 1950s era comedy sitcom “I Love Lucy” suspected that Arnaz’ signature, conga-infused song was a ceremonial drumming ritual designed to invoke the spirit of Babalú-Ayú.

“What he is essentially approximating there is an Afro-Cuban religious ceremony, in which the spirits are invoked by calling them out and drumming in certain patterns to have the spirits arrive, to come to the ritual and participate,” Scher explained. “And sometimes that participation meant essentially spirit possession. People were singing that and had no idea what they were singing about.”

Because the exhibition also embodies multiple disciplines — Latin Americaninternationaland ethnic studieshistorymusicartfolklore, and anthropology— “the teaching potential is tremendous,” Scher said. As they view the artwork and peruse the program, museum visitors listen to piped-in Latin music selections drawn from each of the albums on display and can also take a turn at playing the claves, an important percussion instrument used in African, Brazilian and Cuban music.

Overall, Scher hopes that the takeaway for people is that they will think differently about pop cultural ephemera.

“For many people and for many ways, popular culture is a really viable way of communicating through artistic expression and reaching a lot of people, communicating the most pressing types of issues that confront a particular community,” he said.

Ygnasio and Scher will present a curator’s lecture, part of the CLLAS Spring 2019 Research Presentation Series, on April 11. The exhibition runs through April 21.

By Sharleen Nelson, University Communications




Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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