Clark Honors College historian Mark Carey earns fame as a mountaineer

https://around.uoregon.edu/content/clark-honors-college-historian-earns-fame-mountaineer

from Around the O, Sept. 19, 2018—Mark Carey never saw it coming, but his 20 years of research in a region of South America strongly affected by glaciers have elevated him into international mountaineering fame.

Carey, a historian in the UO’s Clark Honors College and director of the Environmental Studies Program, received the King Albert Mountain Award during ceremonies Sept. 8 in Pontresina, Switzerland. The honor goes to “persons or institutions that have distinguished themselves in some way in the mountain world.”

Carey was joined at the winner’s podium in the King Albert I Memorial Foundation’s 13th award ceremony by Iranian female mountain explorer Nasim Eshqi, Swiss filmmakers who documented a cross-country skiing trip on the Silk Road, and representatives of Italy’s Val Grande National Park.

“I was pretty surprised. I was in shock when they got in touch with me,” Carey said. “I appreciate this award because it values the historical context that I bring into research on glaciers, climate change and natural hazards. And it recognizes the fundamental importance of cross-disciplinary collaborations, which I have increasingly put at the forefront of my research practices with concepts like hydro-social modeling and integrated disaster prevention.” › Continue reading

Bernice Yeung: “The Invisible #MeToos: The fight to end sexual violence against America’s most vulnerable workers”

September 24, 2018
2:00 pmto3:30 pm

Lewis Lounge
Knight Law Center
1515 Agate St.

Race, Ethnicities, and Inequalities Colloquium

Bernice Yeung / Credit: Rachel de Leon/Reveal

Bernice Yeung, Investigative Reporter
Reveal (Center for Investigative Reporting)

From the Reveal website

Bernice Yeung is a reporter for Reveal, covering race and gender. Her work examines issues related to violence against women, labor and employment, immigration, and environmental health.

“Yeung was part of the national Emmy-nominated Rape in the Fields reporting team, which investigated the sexual assault of immigrant farmworkers. The project won an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award and was a finalist for the Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting. › Continue reading

“Power in Puerto Rico”

September 29, 2018
6:00 pmto8:00 pm

Temple Beth Israel
1175 East 29th Avenue
Eugene, OR 97405

“Power in Puerto Rico” 

Political • Economic • Environmental

  • History & analysis by UO Professor Cecilia Enjuto-Rangel and David Sáez, Director, Centro Latino Americano
  • Enjoy a simple Puerto Rican dinner • Music by Rico Perez

This is a fundraiser for Puerto Rico relief, but no one will be turned away for lack of funds.

www.tbieugene.org / info@tbieugene.com / 541.485.7218

Teach-In & Film Screening with director Peter Brett: Dolores

October 22, 2018
11:00 amto12:30 pm
4:00 pmto6:30 pm

 

 
 

CLLAS Teach-In: Film and Activism with film director Peter Bratt
Monday, October 22, 11:00am-12:30pm 
Crater Lake Rooms, EMU

CLLAS Film Screening & Discussion with film director Peter Bratt: DOLORES
Monday, October 22, 4:00pm-6:30pm 
Redwood Auditorium, EMU

United Farm Workers leader Dolores Huerta / photo by George Ballis

DOLORES HUERTA 

Dolores Huerta is among the most important, yet least known, activists in American history. An equal partner in co-founding the first farm workers unions with Cesar Chavez, her enormous contributions have gone largely unrecognized. Dolores tirelessly led the fight for racial and labor justice alongside Chavez, becoming one of the most defiant feminists of the twentieth century—and she continues the fight to this day, at 87. With intimate and unprecedented access to this intensely private mother to eleven, the film reveals the raw, personal stakes involved in committing one’s life to social change. Directed by Peter Bratt. 

PETER BRATT, Producer, Writer & Director 

Peter Bratt is an award-winning screenwriter and independent filmmaker whose first fea-ture FOLLOW ME HOME premiered in competition at the 1996 Sun-dance Film Festival and won the Best Feature Film Audience Award that same year at the San Francisco International Film Festival. In 2009, he and his brother Benjamin produced LA MISSION, a feature film shot on location in their hometown of San Francisco. The film, which Peter wrote and directed, premiered at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival and was the opening night film at the 2009 San Francis-co International Film Festival, the 2009 New York International Lati-no Film Festival, and the 2009 Outfest Film Festival in Los Angeles. For his work on LA MISSION, Peter received the prestigious Norman Lear Writer’s Award and was one of ten American independent filmmakers selected by Sundance and the President’s Committee on Arts and Humanities to launch Sundance Film Forward, a program that uses film and conversation to excite and intro-duce a new generation to the power of story. Peter is a San Francisco Film Commissioner and a long-time consultant for the Friendship House Association of American Indians, a local non-profit serving the Bay Area’s Native population. 

Barbara Sutton “Surviving State Terror: Women’s Testimonies of Repression and Resistance in Argentina”

October 25, 2018
12:30 pmto2:00 pm

Gerlinger Alumni Lounge
1468 University Street
UO campus
Free & open to the public

Surviving State Terror: Women’s Testimonies of Repression and Resistance in Argentina

Barbara Sutton, Associate Professor, Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
University at Albany, State University of New York

Barbara Sutton completed her PhD in sociology at the University of Oregon in 2004. This presentation is based on Sutton’s recently published book, Surviving State Terror. Based on oral testimonies of women who survived clandestine detention centers during a period of state terrorism in Argentina (1976–83), this book illuminates the gendered and embodied forms of trauma that women endured while also highlighting their historical and political agency.

Barbara Sutton / photo by Juana Ghersa

Through the lens of the body as a cross-cutting theme, the book examines gendered dimensions of experience during captivity and beyond. Sexual violence as a weapon of state terror is addressed, yet the book also shows more subtle dynamics of gender inscription through torture. Similarly, though the study attends to motherhood ideologies and the egregious treatment of pregnant women in captivity, it also explores women’s experiences beyond maternity. Public and scholarly discourse has tended to pay attention to the relatives of the people disappeared, particularly mothers; this book makes a needed contribution by bringing to the fore the stories of women who themselves were forcibly disappeared, but ultimately survived.

Surviving State Terror incorporates women survivors’ narratives of solidarity, resistance, and political organizing as well as their perspectives on social change, human rights, and democracy. The book draws on the urgent lessons that women survivors offer to a world that continues to grapple with atrocities. In the words of pioneering scholar of gender and militarization, Cynthia Enloe, the book “reveals how our listening to these women is crucial for sustainable democracy.” Distinguished sociologist Cecilia Menjívar adds that the “author masterfully reveals intersections of state terror and gender ideologies with clear relevance across space and time. A must read.”

Sponsored by the Department of Sociology; Center for the Study of Women in Society; Department of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies; and the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies.

New! Huerto de la Familia Incubator Farm Booth at Saturday Market

Huerto de la Familia has launched a brand-new farm booth incubator at Eugene’s Saturday Farmer’s Market.

The first business to participate is 10 Stars Farm, a Latinx-family farm owned by Florentino and Estela. They will be at Saturday Market every week through the end of the season except for Saturday, August 25th. You can also find 10 Stars Farm at the Tuesday and Thursday markets.

Estela and Florentino are graduates of Huerto de la Familia’s 2017 Cambios Business Class, where they attended 12 weeks of three-hour classes in order to successfully complete their business plan.

Marissa Zarate, executive director of Huerto, notes that Estela and Florentino are proud of their organically grown (but not certified) produce and can’t wait to share it with your family. She says the name “10 Stars Farm,” was thought up by their son and represents them and their eight children. 

CLLAS has a history of relationship to the nonprofit organization Huerto de la Familia.




Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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2017 Latino Roots Celebration

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