CLLAS Research Series: Graduate Grantees

April 23, 2019
12:00 pmto1:30 pm
1:45 pmto3:15 pm

Knight Library
Browsing Room
1501 Kincaid St.

CLLAS Research Series: Graduate Grantees

12-1:30 pm Session I: Environmental Justice, Migration & Labor: Local/Global Implications / Moderator: Prof. Mark Carey (Clark Honors College)

Holly Moulton, Environmental Studies, Environmental Justice and the Local Effects of Glacier Melt: A Case Study in the Peruvian Cordillera Huayhuash

 Diego Contreras, Sociology, Migration Industry in Oregon: How Contractors Define Living and Labor Conditions of Farmworkers

1:45-3:15 pm Session II: Identity, Labor & Agency in Chichén Itzá and the Bolivian Lowlands / Moderator: Assoc. Prof. Derrick Hindery (International Studies) 1

Sofia Vidal, Anthropology, Talking About the Past: Differing Constructions and Conceptions of Time in the Tourist Space of Chichén Itzá

 Maria Pomes Lorences, International Studies,Indigeneity and Mobilization: ¿How do Collective Identities of Lowland Indigenous Nations in Bolivia Influence their Strategies to Implement their Right to Self-Determination and Cultural Promotion?

Panel Discussion — Immigrants out, “Guestworkers” in: A Hidden History of the Trump Years

April 24, 2019
4:00 pmto5:30 pm

Gerlinger Lounge, 1468 University St.
Passover-friendly refreshments will be served

Organized by Julie Weise, 2018-19 Wayne Morse Resident Scholar

In the United States and across Europe, nation-states are slamming their doors on immigrants and refugees. This nationalist reaction to the diversity that globalization has brought seems to portend depressed immigration levels for the foreseeable future. Yet employers still demand immigrant labor in a growing economy. Even as U.S. President Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant rhetoric and policies drove undocumented workers deeper into the shadows, his administration also approved a record-breaking quarter-million temporary agricultural worker visas, known as H2A or “guestworkers.” Similar patterns are in effect around the globe.

In this panel, historians join key Oregon advocates for both agricultural and workers’ interests to contextualize the “guestworker” phenomenon locally and globally, and ask whether it represents the future of immigrant labor in the United States and beyond.

Panelists

Michael Dale is the founder and executive director of the Northwest Workers’ Justice Project, and non-profit law firm that represents low wage, immigrant and contingent workers with respect to civil employment law problems.  He worked for 25 years as an Oregon legal aid attorney, and helped establish the Oregon Law Center in 1995.  Over the last ten years he has been engaged in extensive litigation over the rules governing the use of H-2B temporary workers, winning cases in the 3rd, 11th and 4th Circuit Courts of Appeals.

Christoph Rass is one of Germany’s leading historians of twentieth-century European labor migration. A professor at Osnabrück University’s Institute for Migration and Intercultural Studies, Rass concentrates on institutions and knowledge production in migration regimes, forced migrations, and GIS-based modeling of migration patterns. Rass is a recent recipient of the Kalliope Prize for Migration Research from the German Emigration Center.

Jeff Stone is the CEO of Oregon Association of Nurseries and formerly Chief of Staff to Metro Council. Stone has a BS from the UO in political science and has deep experience in Oregon and national political affairs. He has served as an executive and board member of numerous business and nonprofit organizations.

Julie M. Weise is a scholar of twentieth-century Mexican migration history in global context. An associate professor of history at the University of Oregon, Weise is the author of the prize-winning Corazón de Dixie: Mexicanos in the U.S. South since 1910 (UNC Press, 2015). Her current book project, “Citizenship Displaced: Migrant Political Cultures in the Era of State Control,” places postwar Mexican migration history in conversation with parallel histories in Europe and southern Africa.

Cosponsored by the UO Office of International Affairs, the UO Department of History, and the Global Studies Institute’s Global Oregon Faculty Collaboration Fund. Part of the Wayne Morse Center’s 2017-19 theme, Borders, Migration, and Belonging. The Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics encourages civic engagement and inspires enlightened dialogue by bringing students, scholars, activists, policymakers, and communities together to discuss issues affecting Oregon, our nation, and the world. 

UO Dreamer Ally Training

April 26, 2019
1:00 pmto5:00 pm
May 24, 2019
9:00 amto1:00 pm

Registration for Spring Dreamer Ally Trainings is now open.

To register, please scroll to the bottom of the UO Dreamers website; under faculty and staff resources you will see buttons to register for the April and May trainings.

UO Dreamer Ally Training, Friday, April 26, 2019

1 pm-5pm (lunch included during registration at 12:30pm)

*We cannot accommodate partial attendance, please plan on staying for the entire workshop.

UO Dreamer Ally Training, Friday, May 24, 2019

9 am – 1pm (lunch included, coffee available during registration at 8:30 am)

*We cannot accommodate partial attendance, please plan on staying for the entire workshop.

At this training, faculty, staff & GEs will:

  • Explore the unique challenges facing students at the University of Oregon whose immigrant legal status is precarious or unresolved
  • Review the basic laws and policies affecting these students
  • Learn about appropriate referral resources
  • Learn what you should do if immigration enforcement come to campus
  • Receive guidance on how to effectively support Dreamer and undocumented students and identify one or more positive changes that you and your unit start working on right now

After completing the entire four-hour training, participants will have the opportunity to sign a pledge of confidentiality and support, and receive a sign and pin designating them a “Dreamer Ally.”

*We apologize that we cannot accommodate partial attendance at the training; all four hours are required of all participants. To schedule a shorter, one-hour info session, please see scroll to the bottom of the https://www.uoregon.edu/dreamers  website and click the “Request a Dreamer Info Session” button.  

For more information, please email uodreamers@uoregon.edu.

2019-2020 Fund the Dream Scholarship

May 5, 2019

Deadline is May 5, 2019 at 11:59 pm.

Apply Now! 2019-2020 Fund the Dream Scholarship

To be eligible, students must be admitted to the UO as a new or returning student for fall 2019, or currently enrolled at the UO; be a first-generation college student; be able to show financial need; be ineligible for federal financial aid. This is a one-year award that ranges from $5,000 – $9,000.

Follow link to application:
UO Fund the Dream Scholarship

Contact Justine Carpenter for more information about this scholarship and other resources available to Dreamer and undocumented students at the University of Oregon.

Justine Carpenter, Director, Multicultural & Identity-Based Support Services
Office of the Dean of Students

Policy and Planning Trio Engages Diverse Communities

From Oregon Quarterly, April 3, 2019

In spring 2018, change came to the Bethel neighborhood in Eugene. Royal Elizabeth Park received a new name: Andrea Ortiz Park, after Eugene’s first Latina city councilor. Ortiz served from 2004 to 2012 and died in 2017.

“Naming a public space, like a park, after a Latina really sends a positive message of inclusion and belonging to the Latino community in Eugene,” says Gerardo Sandoval [CLLAS Executive Board member], an associate professor who specializes in community development in the School of Planning, Public Policy and Management (PPPM). “It’s a formal designation that recognizes the positive contributions Latinos are making in Oregon.”

Gerardo Sandoval
Gerardo Sandoval

The renaming followed years of outreach to the Latino community by Sandoval, a supporter of the city’s efforts to make parks more inclusive. Through the Latino Civic Participation Project, he led an initiative to involve low-income, marginalized groups in community development, public policy, and planning.

Sandoval will continue his outreach and research efforts with the new Access and Equity Research Group. The group includes José Meléndez, an expert in equitable public engagement and transformative learning who joined PPPM as an assistant professor in 2018; and John Arroyo, an MIT-trained urban planner who will arrive this fall after completing his Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship in Latino Studies at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe.

“One person dealing with diversity issues cannot address all of those,” Meléndez says. “We need multiple people addressing them.”

In addition to Latinos, the group will study underrepresented indigenous, Asian American, and African American communities, and will examine the links between communities and the design, planning, and management of public space. In particular, the group will focus on “participatory action research,” which emphasizes partnering with communities to solve problems.

“Many of us use qualitative methods that help elucidate stories and deeper context of the communities we research such as ethnography, in-depth interviews, oral histories, and content analysis of archival and current policy and legal documents,” Arroyo says.

José Meléndez and John Arroyo

Like Sandoval, Meléndez and Arroyo have worked with Latino communities. During his doctoral studies and then as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Meléndez investigated the budgeting process in the city’s 49th Ward, finding that Spanish-speaking Latino immigrants struggled to participate due to a language barrier. He partnered with the community to create a Spanish language committee that significantly increased and sustained the participation of its members in civic decision-making.

As a fellow, Arroyo is studying Latino immigrants with his first book project, Shadow Suburbanism: Mexican Everyday Life, Fear, and Space in Greater Atlanta. He is analyzing how Mexican immigrants reshape their suburban environments despite rising anti-immigration policies that distress one of the South’s fastest growing populations.

Meléndez and Arroyo will also continue their research and outreach to Latino communities in Oregon, where that population is growing rapidly. According to the Latino Civic Participation Project, Latinos now make up 14 percent of the state population and 20 percent of the K–12 population.

Says Arroyo: “People don’t realize Oregon is a microcosm of national issues—rural poverty, urban income disparities, influxes of migration, and indigenous and small-city planning and infrastructure.”

—By Alex Cipolle, MA ‘11 (journalism), College of Design

Linguists and Native Americans Team Up on Indigenous Languages

To read the full story, go to Around the O at: https://around.uoregon.edu/oq/linguists-and-native-americans-team-up-on-indigenous-languages?utm_source=oq04-08-19

April 3, 2019—Gabriela Pérez Báez, a new assistant professor in linguistics at Oregon who specializes in the revitalization of indigenous languages, is codirector of the National Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages, which trains Native American community researchers to navigate massive physical and digital archival repositories such as the National Anthropological Archives. The documents and other resources held in these collections are of great value for cultural and linguistic revitalization.

Pérez Báez and Breath of Life codirector Daryl Baldwin of the Myaamia Center at Miami University recently received $311,641 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to provide training to Native researchers on the use of powerful new archival software—the Indigenous Languages Digital Archive (ILDA). Users of ILDA can instantly search tens of thousands of digital records on a query.




Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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