Labor

Fair Trade Rebels: UO graduate Lindsay Naylor has a new book on coffee production in Chiapas

Fair Trade Rebels: Coffee Production and Struggles for Autonomy in Chiapas, by Lindsay Naylor. Diverse Economies and Livable Worlds Series. (University of Minnesota Press, 2019)

Lindsay Naylor is an assistant professor, Department of Geography & Spatial Sciences, College of Earth, Ocean, & Environment at the University of Delaware. As a graduate student at the University of Oregon, she was the recipient of a 2010 CLLAS Graduate Student Research Grant for “Harnessing Multiple Movements: The Intersection of Fair Trade and the Zapatista Movement in Chiapas, Mexico.”

Naylor’s new book is titled Fair Trade Rebels: Coffee Production and Struggles for Autonomy in Chiapas.

Synopsis: Is fair trade really fair? Who is it for, and who gets to decide? Fair Trade Rebels addresses such questions in a new way by shifting the focus from the abstract concept of fair trade–and whether it is “working”–to the perspectives of small farmers. It examines the everyday experiences of resistance and agricultural practice among the campesinos/as of Chiapas, Mexico, who struggle for dignified livelihoods in self-declared autonomous communities in the highlands, confronting inequalities locally in what is really a global corporate agricultural chain.

Based on extensive fieldwork, Fair Trade Rebels draws on stories from Chiapas that have emerged from the farmers’ interaction with both the fair-trade-certified marketplace and state violence. Here Lindsay Naylor discusses the racialized and historical backdrop of coffee production and rebel autonomy in the highlands, underscores the divergence of movements for fairer trade and the so-called alternative certified market, traces the network of such movements from the highlands and into the United States, and evaluates existing food sovereignty and diverse economic exchanges. Putting decolonial thinking in conversation with diverse economies theory, Fair Trade Rebels evaluates fair trade not by the measure of its success or failure but through a unique, place-based approach that expands our understanding of the relationship between fair trade, autonomy, and economic development.

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Bernice Yeung: “The Invisible #MeToos: The fight to end sexual violence against America’s most vulnerable workers”

September 24, 2018
2:00 pmto3:30 pm

Lewis Lounge
Knight Law Center
1515 Agate St.

Race, Ethnicities, and Inequalities Colloquium

Bernice Yeung / Credit: Rachel de Leon/Reveal

Bernice Yeung, Investigative Reporter
Reveal (Center for Investigative Reporting)

From the Reveal website

Bernice Yeung is a reporter for Reveal, covering race and gender. Her work examines issues related to violence against women, labor and employment, immigration, and environmental health.

“Yeung was part of the national Emmy-nominated Rape in the Fields reporting team, which investigated the sexual assault of immigrant farmworkers. The project won an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award and was a finalist for the Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting. › Continue reading

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Thursday, July 19th, 2018 Events, Farmworker Rights, Human Rights, Labor No Comments

Documentary Screening: La Cosecha (The Harvest)

January 23, 2017
1:30 pmto3:00 pm

harvest_documentaryKnight Library
Browsing Room
1501 Kincaid St.
UO campus
Free & open to the public

Documentary screening: La Cosecha (The Harvest)

This documentary addresses agricultural child labor in America.

This screening of The Harvest is part of CSWS’s day-long Lorwin Lecture Series of events focused on “Food First: Justice, Security, and Sovereignty,” which features Saru Jayaraman as keynote speaker. Jayaraman is the co-founder and co-director of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United (ROC United) and director of the Food Labor Research Center at University of California, Berkeley. After 9/11, together with displaced World Trade Center workers, she co-founded ROC, which now has more than 18,000 worker members, 200 employer partners, and several thousand consumer members in a dozen states nationwide.

Other events this day include: › Continue reading

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Thursday, December 15th, 2016 Conference, Events, Farmworker Rights, Film, Labor, Research No Comments

UO Today with Mario Sifuentez – YouTube

Published on Nov 2, 2016

Mario Sifuentez

Mario Sifuentez

Mario Sifuentez, assistant professor of History at UC-Merced. Sifuentez grew up in rural Eastern Oregon from a family of immigrant farm workers from Mexico. A first-generation college student, he attended the University of Oregon and graduated with a triple major in Political Science, History, and Ethnic Studies. Sifuentez returned to the U of O on October 28th, 2016 to speak about his recently released book Of Forests and Fields: Mexican Labor in the Pacific Northwest.

Wednesday, November 9th, 2016 Books, Farmworker Rights, Labor, Public Policy Comments Off on UO Today with Mario Sifuentez – YouTube

Working Futures: Perspectives on Labor from the Global South

May 27, 2016
10:00 amto12:00 pm

Working-Futures-posterBrowsing Room
Knight Library
1501 Kincaid St.

Economic globalization has fundamentally reshaped class and gender dynamics around the world. It has brought millions of young women to work in urban industrial and service sectors, introducing new social roles, aspirations, and modes of precarity. In the industrial sector, labor has become increasingly militant in its demands for decent livelihoods. The symposium brings together scholarship from China, Bangladesh, and the Caribbean to critically examine labor dynamics that ensue from these transformations.

Presentations:

  • CARLA FREEMAN: Professor, Anthropology and Women’s Studies, Emory University
    The Affect of Work-Life under Neoliberalism
  • LAMIA KARIM: Associate Professor, Anthropology, University of Oregon
    The Machine Women: Lifestyle Changes in the Garment Industry in Bangladesh
  • CHING KWAN LEE: Professor, Sociology, University of California at Los Angeles
    ‘Precarization’ or Empowerment? Reflections on Recent Labor Unrest in China
  • EILEEN OTIS: Associate Professor, Sociology, University of Oregon
    Worlds of Work in Walmart, China

› Continue reading

Friday, January 1st, 2016 Events, Labor, Research No Comments

Amy Price: “Women in Labor and the Struggle for Justice: An ethnographic study of workers in the Colombian cut flower industry”

January 16, 2014
3:30 pmto5:00 pm

Amy-Price-Poster

 

 

Erb Memorial Union (EMU)
Walnut Room
1222 E. 13th Ave., UO campus

CLLAS Grad Grantee Presentation

Amy Price is a graduate student in the UO Department of International Studies. Her project examines gendered issues in development and free trade by studying the impact of the U.S.-Colombia Free Trade Agreement and the Labor Action Plan on women workers in the cut flower industry. The research documents the effects experienced on the ground since the passage of the free trade agreement in Colombia. Preliminary findings counter narratives of the U.S. and Colombian governments that claim free trade and a commitment to labor rights have resulted in improvements for workers. This project also looks at barriers to women’s participation in unions and explores other forms of social mobilization within the flower sector. It seeks to provide an analysis of how global processes and local dynamics intersect and shape the experience of women workers in the context of Latin America. › Continue reading

Wednesday, September 11th, 2013 Events, Funding, Labor, Research No Comments



Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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2019 Judge Yassmin Barrios Lecture / photos by Jack Liu

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