Books

Helena María Viramontes: “Under the Feet of Jesus”

October 21, 2019
4:00 pm

2019-2020 UO Common Reading Selection: Under the Feet of Jesus by Helena María Viramontes

A story of loss and survival, Under the Feet of Jesus is a lyrical, powerful novel about the lives of the children, women, and men who endure a difficult existence and labor under dangerous conditions as migrant workers in California’s fields. Through central characters like the teenager, Estrella, and her mother, Petra, the book explores interrelated topics of farm labor, health care, material resources, and environmental justice. The title of the book refers to birth certificates and other important documents kept in a portable statue of Jesus that moves with the family to each new location along the agricultural production cycle.

Learn more about Viramontes’ Under the Feet of Jesus here.

  • October 21 at 4 pm
    Public Talk: EMU Ballroom
  • October 22 at 6 pm
    Public Reading & Conversation: Eugene Public Library
  • October 23 at 10 am
    Teaching Writing Workshop for Faculty and GEs

Sponsored by the UO Common Reading Program. CLLAS is a cosponsor for the campus visit of Helena María Viramontes.

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Tuesday, July 9th, 2019 Books, Events, Farmworker Rights No Comments

Fair Trade Rebels: UO graduate Lindsay Naylor has a new book on coffee production in Chiapas

Fair Trade Rebels: Coffee Production and Struggles for Autonomy in Chiapas, by Lindsay Naylor. Diverse Economies and Livable Worlds Series. (University of Minnesota Press, 2019)

Lindsay Naylor is an assistant professor, Department of Geography & Spatial Sciences, College of Earth, Ocean, & Environment at the University of Delaware. As a graduate student at the University of Oregon, she was the recipient of a 2010 CLLAS Graduate Student Research Grant for “Harnessing Multiple Movements: The Intersection of Fair Trade and the Zapatista Movement in Chiapas, Mexico.”

Naylor’s new book is titled Fair Trade Rebels: Coffee Production and Struggles for Autonomy in Chiapas.

Synopsis: Is fair trade really fair? Who is it for, and who gets to decide? Fair Trade Rebels addresses such questions in a new way by shifting the focus from the abstract concept of fair trade–and whether it is “working”–to the perspectives of small farmers. It examines the everyday experiences of resistance and agricultural practice among the campesinos/as of Chiapas, Mexico, who struggle for dignified livelihoods in self-declared autonomous communities in the highlands, confronting inequalities locally in what is really a global corporate agricultural chain.

Based on extensive fieldwork, Fair Trade Rebels draws on stories from Chiapas that have emerged from the farmers’ interaction with both the fair-trade-certified marketplace and state violence. Here Lindsay Naylor discusses the racialized and historical backdrop of coffee production and rebel autonomy in the highlands, underscores the divergence of movements for fairer trade and the so-called alternative certified market, traces the network of such movements from the highlands and into the United States, and evaluates existing food sovereignty and diverse economic exchanges. Putting decolonial thinking in conversation with diverse economies theory, Fair Trade Rebels evaluates fair trade not by the measure of its success or failure but through a unique, place-based approach that expands our understanding of the relationship between fair trade, autonomy, and economic development.

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NALAC awards artist grant to Ernesto Martínez

February 20, 2019—Ernesto Javier Martínez has been awarded a $5,000 NFA Artist Grant from the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC). An associate professor in the UO Department of Ethnic Studies, Martínez is one of 43 grantees from among 400 applicants to be selected for the 13th cycle of the NALAC Fund for the Arts grant program.

Ernesto Martínez

According to the grant program manager, “These 43 recipients are recognized for their artistic excellence in pursuit of social justice through the arts and were selected from a pool of over 400 applications by a national peer panel process involving 45 arts experts representing diverse disciplines, regions and ethnicities.”

Martínez received the grant “to support the continuation of the Femeniños project, a children’s book and short film series highlighting the experiences of queer Latino/x boys and the families who bear witness to their lives.

This project began in 2017 as a collaboration with the San Francisco-based children’s book author Maya Christina González and has expanded to work with the Los Angeles-based independent film director Adelina Anthony and Oregon-based Hollywood film director Omar Naim. Through the Femeniños project, the artist aims to empower queer Latinx youth through stories that capture their imaginations, embody their cultural roots and represent queer lives in a positive light.”

CLLAS is one of several UO units that have provided grant support to Professor Martínez for his work on this project. In 2018, Martínez published the children’s book When We Love Someone We Sing to Them,which reframes a cultural tradition to include LGBTQ experience. La Serenata is a film adaption of the book. 

“Both the screenplay and the book,” Martínez said, “tell the story of a Mexican-American boy who learns from his parents about serenatas and why demonstrating romantic affection proudly, publicly, and through song is such a treasured Mexican tradition. One day, the boy asks his parents if there is a song for a boy who loves a boy. The parents, surprised by the question and unsure of how to answer, must decide how to honor their son and how to reimagine a beloved tradition.”

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Why are the Migrants Fleeing Honduras?

April 10, 2019
4:00 pmto5:30 pm

Knight Library, Browsing Room, 1501 Kincaid St., UO campus

“Why are the Migrants Fleeing Honduras? Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup”

Speaker: Dana Frank
Professor of History Emerita
University of California, Santa Cruz

In this presentation Dana Frank will discuss her new book, The Long Honduran Night: Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup, which examines Honduras since the 2009 coup that deposed democratically-elected President Manuel Zelaya. In the book, she interweaves her personal experiences in post-coup Honduras and in the US Congress with a larger analysis of the coup regime and its ongoing repression, Honduran opposition movements, US policy in support of the regime, and Congressional challenges to that policy. Her book helps us understand the root causes of the immigrant caravans of Hondurans leaving for the US, and the destructive impact of US policy.

Dana Frank is Professor of History Emerita  at the University of California, Santa Cruz.  Herbooks include Bananeras: Women Transforming the Banana Unions of Latin America, which focuses on Honduras, and Buy American: The Untold Story of Economic Nationalism.  Her writings on human rights and U.S. policy in post-coup Honduras have appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Miami Herald, Houston Chronicle, The Nation, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Politico Magazine, and many other publications, and she has been interviewed by the Washington Post, New Yorker, New York Times, National Public Radio, Univsion, Latino USAregularly on Democracy Now!and on other outlets.  Professor Frank  has testified about Honduras before the US House of Representatives, the California Assembly, and the Canadian Parliament.

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Friday, January 4th, 2019 Books, Events, News No Comments

Ernesto Martínez, “The Femeniños Project: Literature and Visual Media for Queer Latino/x Youth”

March 7, 2019
3:30 pmto5:00 pm

Diamond Lake Room, Erb Memorial Union (EMU 119)

CLLAS Research Series Presentation

“The Femeniños Project: Literature and Visual Media for Queer Latino/x Youth.” 

Ernesto Javier Martínez, associate professor, Department of Ethnic Studies, will present his recent work with the Femeniños Project, a multi-genre storytelling initiative that brings together award-winning filmmakers, writers, illustrators, and musicians to help mitigate the severe underrepresentation of Latino/x youth in contemporary cultural production and to proactively challenge the harm inflicted upon queer youth of color when their humanity is distorted in the mainstream imagination. 

Ernesto Martinez

CLLAS awarded its first Latinx Studies seed grant (2018-19) for research or creative projects to Professor Martinez, for his proposal, “A Child Should Not Long for Its Own Image: Literature and Visual Media for Queer Latinx Youth.” The project included four components: (1) the production of the short film La Serenata; (2) the premier screening of the film at the University of Oregon, followed by a discussion with the director and fellow collaborators; (3) a community conversation about queer Latinx youth with teachers and parents in the Eugene/Springfield area; and (4) free distribution of the bilingual children’s book When We Love Someone, We Sing to Them to local schools, libraries, and community centers.

La Serenata is a film adaption of a children’s book that Martínez wrote, entitled When We Love Someone, We Sing to Them, published in 2018 by Reflections Press. “Both the screenplay and the book,” Martínez said, “tell the story of a Mexican-American boy who learns from his parents about serenatas and why demonstrating romantic affection proudly, publicly, and through song is such a treasured Mexican tradition. One day, the boy asks his parents if there is a song for a boy who loves a boy. The parents, surprised by the question and unsure of how to answer, must decide how to honor their son and how to reimagine a beloved tradition.”

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A Feminist Reading of Debt

May 16, 2019
11:00 amto1:00 pm

CSWS Jane Grant Conference Room (330)
Hendricks Hall
Free & open to the public
Registration required: zambrana@uoregon.edu
Limited capacity: 15 people

“Anticapitalist Feminisms” Workshop
A Feminist Reading of Debt: A conversation with 
Verónica Gago and Luci Cavallero

This workshop is designed to engage faculty and students in the discussion of Verónica Gago and Luci Cavallero’s co-authored book Una lectura feminista de la deuda [A Feminist Reading of Debt] (Fundación Rosa Luxemburgo, 2019; forthcoming in English with Pluto Press). The book provides a theoretical framework to track the impact of debt on women from a novel feminist lens.

This unique work is a groundbreaking contribution to theoretical and practical responses to debt crises in the Americas. A feminist reading of debt entails a visibilization of concrete and individual narratives and bodies against the strategies of financial abstraction; it implies a monitoring of the ways in which debt is linked to modes of violence perpetrated on female and feminized bodies; and it comprehensively maps forms of labor understood from a feminist perspective, attaching value to domestic, reproductive and community oriented labor. Ultimately, the books seeks to interrogate all the possible ways in which women can rebel against the neoliberal financial logic with its interest rates and the expropriation of women’s time and bodies. This workshop is an opportunity for our UO community to take part in current conversations about the role of feminist movements in bringing about critical perspectives to engage political, social and economic aspects of the world we live today.

Verónica Gago teaches Political Science at the Universidad de Buenos Aires and is Professor of Sociology at the Instituto de Altos Estudios, Universidad Nacional de San Martín. She is also Assistant Researcher at the National Council of Research (CONICET). She has been a Visiting Scholar in the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs at UC Berkeley, and is the author of Neoliberalism from Below: Popular Pragmatics and Baroque Economies (Tinta Limón 2014; Duke University Press, 2017) as well as of numerous articles published in journals and books throughout Latin America, Europe and the US. She is a prominent member of Argentina’s “Ni Una Menos” (“Not one less”) and Colectivo Situaciones. Luci Cavallero is an activist, author and journalist. Co-author of A FeministReading of Debt (Rosa Luxemburgo, 2019).

Associate Professor Rocío Zambrana (Philosophy) and Assistant Professor Mayra Bottaro (Romance Languages) will lead the workshop discussions and facilitate the conversations with Gago and Cavallero.

Event sponsored by The Women of Color Project, the Center for Latino and Latin American Studies (CLLAS), the Department of Philosophy, and the Center for the Study of Women in Society.

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Tuesday, January 1st, 2019 Books, Events No Comments



Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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2019 Judge Yassmin Barrios Lecture / photos by Jack Liu

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