Publications

Fair Trade Rebels: UO graduate Lindsay Naylor has a new book on coffee production in Chiapas

Fair Trade Rebels: Coffee Production and Struggles for Autonomy in Chiapas, by Lindsay Naylor. Diverse Economies and Livable Worlds Series. (University of Minnesota Press, 2019)

Lindsay Naylor is an assistant professor, Department of Geography & Spatial Sciences, College of Earth, Ocean, & Environment at the University of Delaware. As a graduate student at the University of Oregon, she was the recipient of a 2010 CLLAS Graduate Student Research Grant for “Harnessing Multiple Movements: The Intersection of Fair Trade and the Zapatista Movement in Chiapas, Mexico.”

Naylor’s new book is titled Fair Trade Rebels: Coffee Production and Struggles for Autonomy in Chiapas.

Synopsis: Is fair trade really fair? Who is it for, and who gets to decide? Fair Trade Rebels addresses such questions in a new way by shifting the focus from the abstract concept of fair trade–and whether it is “working”–to the perspectives of small farmers. It examines the everyday experiences of resistance and agricultural practice among the campesinos/as of Chiapas, Mexico, who struggle for dignified livelihoods in self-declared autonomous communities in the highlands, confronting inequalities locally in what is really a global corporate agricultural chain.

Based on extensive fieldwork, Fair Trade Rebels draws on stories from Chiapas that have emerged from the farmers’ interaction with both the fair-trade-certified marketplace and state violence. Here Lindsay Naylor discusses the racialized and historical backdrop of coffee production and rebel autonomy in the highlands, underscores the divergence of movements for fairer trade and the so-called alternative certified market, traces the network of such movements from the highlands and into the United States, and evaluates existing food sovereignty and diverse economic exchanges. Putting decolonial thinking in conversation with diverse economies theory, Fair Trade Rebels evaluates fair trade not by the measure of its success or failure but through a unique, place-based approach that expands our understanding of the relationship between fair trade, autonomy, and economic development.

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Spring 2019 CLLAS Notes

0519-CLLAS-newsletter_FINAL

The 2019 spring edition of CLLAS Notes, our twice-yearly newsletter, is now available online and in print.

History professor Carlos Aguirre reviews his tenure as CLLAS interim director and takes us on a look ahead at the new two-year plan for CLLAS, a series of initiatives and events under the theme “The Politics of Language in the Americas.”

Learn about Judge Yassmin Barrios’s visit to the UO campus in March and her lecture on “Justice and Reparation in Guatemala,” where she talked about her experience with the High Risk Crime Tribunal over which she presides. Check out the accounts of graduate student research in Peru and Guatemala and faculty research in Bolivia. Read about CLLAS founding director Lynn Stephen’s experience as the president of the Latin American Studies Association.

CLLAS event planner & project manager Feather Crawford fills us in on the January CLLAS Town Hall with Mae Ngai, the 2018-19 Wayne Morse Center Chair. And thanks to Crawford’s excellent reporting, you can find out more about why migrants are fleeing Honduras when you read her account of historian Dana Frank’s detailed talk held in April.

The 2019 Spring edition of CLLAS Notes, Volume 10, Issue 2 includes:

  • Letter from Interim Director Carlos Aguirre
  • “Justice and Reparation in Guatemala”—Judge Yassmin Barrios’s lecture about justice & human rights in Guatemala
  • “Lynn Stephen Completes Her Tenure as LASA President”
  • Faculty Research—“Strugging with Sustainability: Guarayo Cultural and Environmental Management Challenges”
  • Graduate Research—“Responses to Gendered Violence in Costa Rica and Guatemala”
  • Graduate Research—“Sounds of Power: Peruvian colonial pipe organs in the interplay of cultures”
  • Graduate Research—“Environmental Justice and the Local Effects of Glacier Melt in the Peruvian Cordillera Huayhuash”
  • News & Book Notes
  • Event Reports
  • 2019-20 Grant Recipients

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2018 CLLAS Impact Report now available

October 15, 2018—Our 2017-18 CLLAS Impact Report will soon be available in hard copy for those who request it. The PDF version can be accessed now at: 2017-18 CLLAS Impact Rpt final WEB

This report includes a discussion of project highlights, research funding, and events from AY 2017-18.

It also showcases the CLLAS Town Hall with Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist José Antonio Vargas from last October, the awarding of the inaugural Latinx Studies Seed Grant to Ernesto Martínez, associate professor in the Department of Ethnic Studies, for his project “A Child Should Not Long for Its Own Image: Literature and Visual Media for Queer Latinx Youth,” a letter wrapping up all of last year’s key events from director Gabriela Martínez, and important statistics reflecting CLLAS’s impact on campus.

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Monday, October 22nd, 2018 Publications No Comments

Ricardo Valencia, former CLLAS board member, now teaching at Cal State, Fullerton

Ricardo J. Valencia

Former CLLAS graduate research grantee and executive board member Ricardo J. Valencia is now teaching at California State University, Fullerton and has recently published an article about public relations and political opposition against President Ronald Reagan in the United States for his foreign policy towards El Salvador. Valencia completed his PhD in media studies (SOJC) at the University of Oregon earlier this year, and in fall 2018 joined the Cal State, Fullerton faculty in the Department of Communications as an assistant professor.

His research article was published Oct. 3, 2018 in the journal Public Relations Inquiry and can be found here: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2046147X18788704

› Continue reading

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Saturday, October 20th, 2018 Academics, People, Publications No Comments

Vulnerable But Not Broken: Psychosocial Challenges and Resilience Pathways among Unaccompanied Children from Central America

Vulnerable But Not Broken Final Report Aug 2018

Vulnerable But Not Broken: Psychosocial Challenges and Resilience Pathways among Unaccompanied Children from Central America

© 2018 Immigration Psychology Working Group

This report provides an overview on the myriad issues facing unaccompanied children from Central America apprehended at the Southwest border of the United States. The document highlights these children’s ability to overcome challenging histories and adapt to the changes in familial and social environment that life in the United States presents, and identifies some of the key supportive resources that can help them to do so. The psychosocial aspects of this humanitarian crisis are reviewed, outlining priority areas for future research and providing recommendations for culturally and developmentally informed practice, programs, and legal advocacy. 

Monday, August 20th, 2018 Human Rights, News, Public Policy, Publications No Comments

Spring 2018 CLLAS Notes now available

Spring 2018 CLLAS_Notes_WEB

In the latest edition of CLLAS Notes, you can read about field research in Oaxaca carried out by 2017 Tinker grantee Timothy Herrera and learn about dissertation research focused on the intersection of gender, race, and disability conducted by CLLAS graduate student research grantee Katie Warden.

Kristin Yarris, Brenda Garcia Millan, and Karla Schmidt-Murillo write about the collaborative research they are carrying out that investigates how local communities are responding to the current hostile climate toward immigrants and refugees.

This spring issue of CLLAS Notes includes an article about the CLLAS 2018 symposium “Justice Across Borders: Gender, Race, and Migration in the Americas.” A report on the “UO Puerto Rico Project: Hurricane Maria and Its Aftermath,” written by CLLAS executive board member Alaí Reyes-Santos and one of her ethnic studies students, provides an excellent look at teaching through action. 

CLLAS director Gabriela Martínez highlights the many events sponsored throughout the 2017-18 academic year by CLLAS. A report from Feather Crawford on the Dreamers Working Group provides insight into how UO is creating a community of welcome through allyship trainings and other advocacy efforts.

You can also learn about recently published books and journal articles, as well as news and updates on the achievements of faculty and graduate students.

All this and more are included in this Spring 2018 edition of CLLAS Notes, the twice-yearly newsletter for the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies. Watch for yours soon in your campus or home mailbox, or view it now online. 

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Friday, June 1st, 2018 Academics, Awards, News, Publications, Research No Comments



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Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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