Farmworker Rights

Bernice Yeung: “The Invisible #MeToos: The fight to end sexual violence against America’s most vulnerable workers”

September 24, 2018
2:00 pmto3:30 pm

Lewis Lounge
Knight Law Center
1515 Agate St.

Race, Ethnicities, and Inequalities Colloquium

Bernice Yeung / Credit: Rachel de Leon/Reveal

Bernice Yeung, Investigative Reporter
Reveal (Center for Investigative Reporting)

From the Reveal website

Bernice Yeung is a reporter for Reveal, covering race and gender. Her work examines issues related to violence against women, labor and employment, immigration, and environmental health.

“Yeung was part of the national Emmy-nominated Rape in the Fields reporting team, which investigated the sexual assault of immigrant farmworkers. The project won an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award and was a finalist for the Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting. › Continue reading

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Wednesday, September 19th, 2018 Events, Farmworker Rights, Human Rights, Labor No Comments

Teach-In & Film Screening with director Peter Brett: Dolores

October 22, 2018
11:00 amto12:30 pm
4:00 pmto6:30 pm

 

 
 

CLLAS Teach-In: Film and Activism with film director Peter Bratt
Monday, October 22, 11:00am-12:30pm 
Crater Lake Rooms, EMU

CLLAS Film Screening & Discussion with film director Peter Bratt: DOLORES
Monday, October 22, 4:00pm-6:30pm 
Redwood Auditorium, EMU

United Farm Workers leader Dolores Huerta / photo by George Ballis

DOLORES HUERTA 

Dolores Huerta is among the most important, yet least known, activists in American history. An equal partner in co-founding the first farm workers unions with Cesar Chavez, her enormous contributions have gone largely unrecognized. Dolores tirelessly led the fight for racial and labor justice alongside Chavez, becoming one of the most defiant feminists of the twentieth century—and she continues the fight to this day, at 87. With intimate and unprecedented access to this intensely private mother to eleven, the film reveals the raw, personal stakes involved in committing one’s life to social change. Directed by Peter Bratt. 

PETER BRATT, Producer, Writer & Director 

Peter Bratt is an award-winning screenwriter and independent filmmaker whose first fea-ture FOLLOW ME HOME premiered in competition at the 1996 Sun-dance Film Festival and won the Best Feature Film Audience Award that same year at the San Francisco International Film Festival. In 2009, he and his brother Benjamin produced LA MISSION, a feature film shot on location in their hometown of San Francisco. The film, which Peter wrote and directed, premiered at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival and was the opening night film at the 2009 San Francis-co International Film Festival, the 2009 New York International Lati-no Film Festival, and the 2009 Outfest Film Festival in Los Angeles. For his work on LA MISSION, Peter received the prestigious Norman Lear Writer’s Award and was one of ten American independent filmmakers selected by Sundance and the President’s Committee on Arts and Humanities to launch Sundance Film Forward, a program that uses film and conversation to excite and intro-duce a new generation to the power of story. Peter is a San Francisco Film Commissioner and a long-time consultant for the Friendship House Association of American Indians, a local non-profit serving the Bay Area’s Native population. 

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Tuesday, September 18th, 2018 Events, Farmworker Rights No Comments

New! Huerto de la Familia Incubator Farm Booth at Saturday Market

Huerto de la Familia has launched a brand-new farm booth incubator at Eugene’s Saturday Farmer’s Market.

The first business to participate is 10 Stars Farm, a Latinx-family farm owned by Florentino and Estela. They will be at Saturday Market every week through the end of the season except for Saturday, August 25th. You can also find 10 Stars Farm at the Tuesday and Thursday markets.

Estela and Florentino are graduates of Huerto de la Familia’s 2017 Cambios Business Class, where they attended 12 weeks of three-hour classes in order to successfully complete their business plan.

Marissa Zarate, executive director of Huerto, notes that Estela and Florentino are proud of their organically grown (but not certified) produce and can’t wait to share it with your family. She says the name “10 Stars Farm,” was thought up by their son and represents them and their eight children. 

CLLAS has a history of relationship to the nonprofit organization Huerto de la Familia.

Thursday, August 23rd, 2018 Farmworker Rights, News No Comments

7-Year Update from the CAPACES Leadership Institute

Current staff from left to right. Top row: Eduardo Serrano, Edward Gutierrez, Jaime Arredondo, Alex Buron, and Berenice Vargas. Bottom row: Fabiola Ramos, Ines Peña, and Maricela Andrade. Not pictured: Juan Diego Ramos

 

Our First Seven Years

Seven years ago this month, community leaders took a risk, and created the CAPACES Leadership Institute to prepare leaders with the political consciousness and capacity needed to lead and support social justice work. On this special occasion, we would like to share a few of our successes so far and ask that you continue to renew your support of our work.
 
September of 2012: The CLI launches the TURNO youth leadership program to create a path for youth embrace and prepare for long-term movement leadership. The program began with ten youth and one part-time staff. This next school year we will have 2.5 FTE dedicated to the program and expect to serve well over thirty youth.
 
September 2013: Over 75 community supporters gather to unveil the CLI’s “Wings of History and Hope” mural, the first publicly displayed mural in Woodburn. Over 150 volunteers helped make this happen, both changing the law in Woodburn and painting the mural. Today Woodburn has multiple publicly displayed murals.
 
June 2014: CLI launches its “national” leadership development work by testing out it’s Seven Dimensions program with a cohort of 20 leaders from the Fair Immigration Reform Movement. Seven Dimensions is a three-plus day gathering where participants engage with each other about the dilemmas of making and keeping a long-term commitment to the social justice movement work.  Last month, we ran our third cohort and have now engaged over 75 leaders in the program. We plan on running another cohort this fall with leaders from our sister organizations and allies.
 
May 2015: TURNO youth lead the way in passing a $63 million Woodburn School Bond, that hadn’t passed since 1994. This fall TURNO youth will be at it again, working to defeat the anti-immigrant Measure 105, which would repeal our state’s 30 year old sanctuary law.
 
September 2017: The CLI launches its DACA Advocacy Capacity building project to boost the capacity of DACA youth to mobilize their communities. Here is what one of the youth had to say about their experience: “I can honestly say that the fire that was awaken in me through the opportunity of working for CAPACES and the leader they created in me has been thrilling. The most rewarding thing for me through this journey has been the connection with real DREAMers whom feel the same way I do. It’s been a hardship knowing congress didn’t passed a Clean Dream Act. But, I know our fight continues and one day we will get that solution we need for all eleven thousands of us DREAMers and undocumented youth. They tried to bury us. But, they didn’t know we were seeds.”
 
March 2018-  The CLI launches Oregon’s first bilingual public service training program–People’s Representatives–to bridge the Latinx leadership gap in public service bodies (elected and non-elected) in the Mid-Willamette Valley. 
 
As you can tell, we’ve had a busy seven years.  Our work has impacted many individuals, but more importantly the communities they live in.  We couldn’t have done this without your support and hope you can continue to partner with us in our journey. Thank you.

Jaime Arredondo

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PhD candidate James Daria receives a Food Studies Graduate Research Grant

June 2018—UO’s Food Studies Program announced recipients of its 2018-19 Food Studies Graduate Research Grants, with some additional funds provided by the Graduate School. Among those receiving a grant was James Daria, a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology, for his graduate research work: “Modern Slavery in Agricultural Sweatshops along the US/Mexican Border.” Daria has been a recipient of a past Faculty Collaborative Research Grant from CLLAS for producing a multilingual documentary film in collaboration with faculty member Philip Scher, another graduate student, and the farmworkers union Pineros y Campesinos Unidos de Noroeste (PCUN).

Farmworkers deserve better pesticide rules

Editor’s Note: David Vázquez is a former interim director of the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS). He is the Head of the UO Department of English.

Eugene Register-Guard Op-Ed: “Farmworkers deserve better pesticide rules”

by Lisa Arkin, executive director of Beyond Toxics; David Vázquez, associate professor of English at the University of Oregon; and Raoul Liévanos, assistant professor of sociology at UO.

December 4, 2017—

More than 1 billion pounds of poisonous pesticides are applied on farms annually in the United States, resulting in as many as 20,000 physician-diagnosed poisonings annually among agricultural workers. University of Oregon environmental studies scholar Sarah Wald puts the number of farmworkers exposed to toxic levels of pesticides closer to 300,000, more than 10 times the official number. A 2008 report by the state ­Department of Agriculture showed that 15.5 million pounds of pesticides were applied on Oregon farms.

For the full text, go to: Farmworkers deserve better pesticide rules




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2017 Latino Roots Celebration

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