Public Policy

Panel Discussion — Immigrants out, “Guestworkers” in: A Hidden History of the Trump Years

April 24, 2019
4:00 pmto5:30 pm

Gerlinger Lounge, 1468 University St.
Passover-friendly refreshments will be served

Organized by Julie Weise, 2018-19 Wayne Morse Resident Scholar

In the United States and across Europe, nation-states are slamming their doors on immigrants and refugees. This nationalist reaction to the diversity that globalization has brought seems to portend depressed immigration levels for the foreseeable future. Yet employers still demand immigrant labor in a growing economy. Even as U.S. President Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant rhetoric and policies drove undocumented workers deeper into the shadows, his administration also approved a record-breaking quarter-million temporary agricultural worker visas, known as H2A or “guestworkers.” Similar patterns are in effect around the globe.

In this panel, historians join key Oregon advocates for both agricultural and workers’ interests to contextualize the “guestworker” phenomenon locally and globally, and ask whether it represents the future of immigrant labor in the United States and beyond.

Panelists

Michael Dale is the founder and executive director of the Northwest Workers’ Justice Project, and non-profit law firm that represents low wage, immigrant and contingent workers with respect to civil employment law problems.  He worked for 25 years as an Oregon legal aid attorney, and helped establish the Oregon Law Center in 1995.  Over the last ten years he has been engaged in extensive litigation over the rules governing the use of H-2B temporary workers, winning cases in the 3rd, 11th and 4th Circuit Courts of Appeals.

Christoph Rass is one of Germany’s leading historians of twentieth-century European labor migration. A professor at Osnabrück University’s Institute for Migration and Intercultural Studies, Rass concentrates on institutions and knowledge production in migration regimes, forced migrations, and GIS-based modeling of migration patterns. Rass is a recent recipient of the Kalliope Prize for Migration Research from the German Emigration Center.

Jeff Stone is the CEO of Oregon Association of Nurseries and formerly Chief of Staff to Metro Council. Stone has a BS from the UO in political science and has deep experience in Oregon and national political affairs. He has served as an executive and board member of numerous business and nonprofit organizations.

Julie M. Weise is a scholar of twentieth-century Mexican migration history in global context. An associate professor of history at the University of Oregon, Weise is the author of the prize-winning Corazón de Dixie: Mexicanos in the U.S. South since 1910 (UNC Press, 2015). Her current book project, “Citizenship Displaced: Migrant Political Cultures in the Era of State Control,” places postwar Mexican migration history in conversation with parallel histories in Europe and southern Africa.

Cosponsored by the UO Office of International Affairs, the UO Department of History, and the Global Studies Institute’s Global Oregon Faculty Collaboration Fund. Part of the Wayne Morse Center’s 2017-19 theme, Borders, Migration, and Belonging. The Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics encourages civic engagement and inspires enlightened dialogue by bringing students, scholars, activists, policymakers, and communities together to discuss issues affecting Oregon, our nation, and the world. 

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Wednesday, April 17th, 2019 Events, Farmworker Rights, Public Policy No Comments

Policy and Planning Trio Engages Diverse Communities

From Oregon Quarterly, April 3, 2019

In spring 2018, change came to the Bethel neighborhood in Eugene. Royal Elizabeth Park received a new name: Andrea Ortiz Park, after Eugene’s first Latina city councilor. Ortiz served from 2004 to 2012 and died in 2017.

“Naming a public space, like a park, after a Latina really sends a positive message of inclusion and belonging to the Latino community in Eugene,” says Gerardo Sandoval [CLLAS Executive Board member], an associate professor who specializes in community development in the School of Planning, Public Policy and Management (PPPM). “It’s a formal designation that recognizes the positive contributions Latinos are making in Oregon.”

Gerardo Sandoval
Gerardo Sandoval

The renaming followed years of outreach to the Latino community by Sandoval, a supporter of the city’s efforts to make parks more inclusive. Through the Latino Civic Participation Project, he led an initiative to involve low-income, marginalized groups in community development, public policy, and planning.

Sandoval will continue his outreach and research efforts with the new Access and Equity Research Group. The group includes José Meléndez, an expert in equitable public engagement and transformative learning who joined PPPM as an assistant professor in 2018; and John Arroyo, an MIT-trained urban planner who will arrive this fall after completing his Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship in Latino Studies at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe.

“One person dealing with diversity issues cannot address all of those,” Meléndez says. “We need multiple people addressing them.”

In addition to Latinos, the group will study underrepresented indigenous, Asian American, and African American communities, and will examine the links between communities and the design, planning, and management of public space. In particular, the group will focus on “participatory action research,” which emphasizes partnering with communities to solve problems.

“Many of us use qualitative methods that help elucidate stories and deeper context of the communities we research such as ethnography, in-depth interviews, oral histories, and content analysis of archival and current policy and legal documents,” Arroyo says.

José Meléndez and John Arroyo

Like Sandoval, Meléndez and Arroyo have worked with Latino communities. During his doctoral studies and then as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Meléndez investigated the budgeting process in the city’s 49th Ward, finding that Spanish-speaking Latino immigrants struggled to participate due to a language barrier. He partnered with the community to create a Spanish language committee that significantly increased and sustained the participation of its members in civic decision-making.

As a fellow, Arroyo is studying Latino immigrants with his first book project, Shadow Suburbanism: Mexican Everyday Life, Fear, and Space in Greater Atlanta. He is analyzing how Mexican immigrants reshape their suburban environments despite rising anti-immigration policies that distress one of the South’s fastest growing populations.

Meléndez and Arroyo will also continue their research and outreach to Latino communities in Oregon, where that population is growing rapidly. According to the Latino Civic Participation Project, Latinos now make up 14 percent of the state population and 20 percent of the K–12 population.

Says Arroyo: “People don’t realize Oregon is a microcosm of national issues—rural poverty, urban income disparities, influxes of migration, and indigenous and small-city planning and infrastructure.”

—By Alex Cipolle, MA ‘11 (journalism), College of Design

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Wednesday, April 3rd, 2019 Advisory Board, Public Policy No Comments

Christen Smith, “The Sequelae of Black Life in Brazil and the US: Violence, Gender, Space and Time”

March 5, 2019
3:30 pmto5:00 pm

Knight Library, Browsing Room
1501 Kincaid St.

Race, Ethnicities, and Inequalities Colloquium

“The Sequelae of Black Life in Brazil and the US: Violence, Gender, Space and Time”
Christen Smith, Associate Professor of African and African Diaspora Studies and Anthropology
University of Texas at Austin

Christen Smith researches engendered anti-Black state violence and Black community responses to it in Brazil and the Americas. Her work primarily focuses on transnational anti-Black police violence, Black liberation struggles, the paradox of Black citizenship in the Americas, and the dialectic between the enjoyment of Black culture and the killing of Black people. Her book, Afro-Paradise: Blackness, Violence and Performance in Braziluses the lens of performance to examine the immediate and long-term impact of police violence on the Black population of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil and the grassroots movement to denounce and end this violence. Her more recent, comparative work examines the lingering, deadly impact of police violence on black women in Brazil and the U.S. 

Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and Academic Affairs, Center for the Study of Women in Society, Department of Anthropology, and the UO School of Law.

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CLLAS Town Hall with Mae Ngai: “Citizenship and Denaturalization in the Era of US Nationalism”

January 17, 2019
4:00 pmto5:30 pm

 

 

Knight Library, Browsing Room
1501 Kincaid St.

CLLAS Town Hall with Mae Ngai

The Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS) is sponsoring a Town Hall on January 17 at 4 pm with Mae Ngai, the 2018-19 Wayne Morse Chair. The discussion will focus on “Citizenship and Denaturalization in the Era of US Nationalism” and will be moderated by Rocío Zambrana, associate professor in the UO Department of Philosophy. Location is the Knight Library Browsing Room.

Mae Ngai is the Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies and professor of history, Columbia University. Her research focuses on immigration, citizenship, and nationalism. Ngai is the author of Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America (2004), which won six major book awards, and The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America(2010). Ngai has written on immigration history and policy for The Washington Post, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Nation, and the Boston Review. Before becoming a historian, she was a labor-union organizer and educator in New York City, working for District 65-UAW and the Consortium for Worker Education. Her upcoming book is Yellow and Gold: The Chinese Mining Diaspora, 1848-1908, a study of Chinese gold miners and racial politics in nineteenth-century California, the Australian colony of Victoria, and the South African Transvaal.

See also this article on Mae Ngai from Around the O: Professor of immigration history named 2018-19 Morse Chair

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Undocumented and DACAmented Mental Health

Blog Post by Eric Garcia, PhD, Senior Staff Therapist & Latinx Student Specialist
from the UO Counseling Center website at: https://counseling.uoregon.edu/undocumented-and-dacamented-mental-health

see also: https://cllas.uoregon.edu/resources/daca-info/latinx-undocumented-student-specialists/

Photo by Molly Adams (CC BY 2.0)

It goes without saying that being a dreamer or undocumented can feel like a nightmare. You are tasked with moving forward without the same opportunities provided to others around you. If you have DACA, you’re only able to plan two years of your life a time (assuming there are no abrupt executive orders). If you are mixed-status, you may be greatly worried about your family and loved ones. If you are undocumented and do not consider yourself a dreamer or DACAmented, you may have well-intentioned people (such as myself) who do not always address your unique experiences.

Some of these identities may mean that you miss out on experiences like driving a car, studying abroad, or receiving financial aid. You most likely also have to deal with anti-immigrant rhetoric or experience overt racism and xenophobia in your daily life. Lastly, you may feel the need to keep this aspect of your life to yourself, while only letting a trusted few know what you are going through. I name these experiences not to bring more worries to you, but rather, to acknowledge in amazement the profound challenges that you continue to surmount, as well as to offer some guidance and resources as you continue to press on. › Continue reading

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PPPM Becomes an Innovative Research Hub for Diversity in Planning, Policy, and Design

Editor’s Note: Professor Gerardo Sandoval is a member of the CLLAS Executive Board.

October 24, 2018—College of Design / School of Planning, Public Policy, and Management

PPPM Becomes an Innovative Research Hub for Diversity in Planning, Policy, and Design

Associate Professor Gerardo Sandoval and Assistant Professor José Melendez.

Oregon is positioned to become a leader for researching diversity, equity, and inclusion in public processes and engagement, and the College of Design’s School of Planning, Public Policy and Management (PPPM) will be at the forefront.

Three leading scholars in diversity research are joining forces for the new Engaging Diverse Communities team at PPPM.

Associate Professor Gerardo Sandoval is in his eighth year at the University of Oregon, and researches public engagement and participation in policymaking and planning. This summer, the College of Design appointed Sandoval as the first-ever Dean’s Fellow for Diversity. › Continue reading

Monday, October 29th, 2018 Academics, Advisory Board, News, Public Policy No Comments



Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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