Public Policy

Oregon Senate Confirms Gerardo Francisco Sandoval as Land Conservation and Development Commissioner

Editor’s Note: Gerardo Sandoval served previously as a co-director of CLLAS.

December 6, 2019—From Around the O

On December 2, the Oregon Senate confirmed Professor Gerardo Sandoval as a commissioner on the Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC). During his term, which began December 1, 2019, and ends November 30, 2023, Sandoval will represent the Willamette Valley region.

portrait of professor Gerardo Sandoval
Gerardo Sandoval

“This is tremendous for [the State of] Oregon,” said Director Jim Rue in the committee’s press release. “Dr. Sandoval’s research, experience, and perspective will help ensure our work benefits all Oregonians.”

The commission, assisting the Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD), adopts state land-use goals and implements rules, assures local plan compliance with the 19 statewide planning goals, coordinates state and local planning, and manages the coastal zone program. The commission is also tasked with implementing rules on issues as wide-ranging as wildfire planning and urban growth boundaries to re-zoning for “missing middle” housing and the push to allow breweries on hops farms.

Sandoval is an associate professor in the School of Planning, Public Policy and Management (PPPM) at the University of Oregon. His work and research focus on the intersection of planning, immigration, and community change. 

In addition to now serving as a LCDC commissioner, Sandoval is currently serving a four-year appointment as a councilmember on the State’s Housing Stability Council (HSC). The HSC leads the work of the OregonHousing and Community Services (OHCS) department to meet the housing and services needs of low- and moderate-income Oregonians. The Housing Stability Council works to establish and support OHCS’ strategic direction, foster constructive partnerships across the state, set policy and issue funding decisions, and overall lend their unique expertise to the policy and program development of the agency.

“It is an honor to serve the state of Oregon in this capacity,” said Sandoval. “Public service is at the core of the UO’s ethos.” 

Sandoval’s expertise has been recognized through numerous awards and honors, including the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Award from the UO for promoting diversity, social justice, and equity. Sandoval is also the College of Design’s Dean’s Fellow for Diversity and leads the college’s Diversity and Inclusion Committee and its implementation of its Diversity Action Plan.

“Affecting positive change in the State of Oregon is embedded in the UO and PPPM missions, so it’s not at all surprising that Gerardo would lend his expertise to this effort,” said Rich Margerum, director of the School of Planning, Public Policy and Management.

Learn more about the commission and its work on the LCD Commission’s website.

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Wednesday, December 18th, 2019 Affiliated faculty, Public Policy No Comments

Political Discussion Networks, Political Engagement, and the Latino Electorate

January 23, 2020
4:00 pm

Knight Library, Browsing Room

Marisa Abrajano is professor of political science at the University of California, San Diego. Her research interests are in American politics, particularly in developing ways to increase politics participation and civic engagement amongst racial/ethnic minorities. Her most recent book is White Backlash: Immigration, Race and American Politics (with Zoltan Hajnal, 2015).

Sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics. Cosponsored by the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies.

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Friday, October 18th, 2019 Events, Public Policy No Comments

Dreamers Working Group: 2019 Impact Report

2019 Impact Report: Dreamers Working Group

From the report:

“Thanks to the generosity of donors, the support of the UO Advancement team, and the determination of DWG staff, UO Dreamer Scholarships are now available to undocumented & Dreamer Ducks! The Opportunity Through Excellence, or Fund the Dream Scholarship as it is known through our outreach efforts, aims to bridge the gap for those undocumented, DACA, and Dreamer students who are not able to complete a FAFSA and obtain federally-funded financial aid.  These students are not able to access scholarships such as Pathway Oregon and grants such as the Pell Grant.  Thanks to the generosity of our donors we have been able to offer, for the first time, scholarships to students beginning in spring 2019.” 

 Feather J. Crawford, CLLAS event planner & project manager, is also a staff member of the Dreamers Working Group.

The UO Dreamers Working Group is supported by the Office of the President, the Office of the Dean of Students, the Division of Equity and Inclusion, Undergraduate Education and Student Success, and the Division of Global Engagement. EO/AA/ADA Institution; Committed to Cultural Diversity.

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The Migrant Caravan: From Honduras to Tijuana

The Migrant Caravan: From Honduras to Tijuana
An Analysis by the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies Fellows (2018-2019)

Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies School of Global Policy and Strategy
University of California San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive # 0519
La Jolla, CA 92093-0519

This PDF is a recent report about the migrant caravan published by the Center for U.S.-Mexicana Studies, which granted permission for CLLAS to disseminate via our website.

The report talks about the conditions that produced the caravan in Central America, responses from civil society in Mexico and the U.S., explains what asylum is and how and why people seek it and some stories about asylees, and then political responses in Mexico to the caravan.

This report includes pieces by CLLAS founding director Lynn Stephen, Philip H. Knight Chair, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences, Professor of Anthropology, and James Daria, a PhD student at University of Oregon in cultural anthropology and a previous CLLAS Graduate Student grantee and Faculty/Student Collaborative grantee.

See their articles on these pages:

  • “The Northern Triangle of Central America: Violence, Displacement, and Refuge,” by James Daria / p. 4
  • “The Response of Civil Society on Both Sides of the U.S.-Mexican Border,” by James Daria, Carolina Valdivia, and Abigail Thornton / p. 22
  • “The Path to Legal Safety: A Mismatch between the Law and the Practice.” by Lynn Stephen and Teresita Rocha Jiménez / p. 32

Following on the 2018-19 AY visits by Judge Yassmin Barrios and Dana Frank (professor of history emerita, University of California, Santa Cruz), this report should be of particular interest to the CLLAS community of faculty, staff, students, and community members.

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Latinx Environmentalisms Book Party

November 21, 2019
4:00 pmto5:30 pm

Save the Date: Latinx Environmentalisms Book Party 11/21 4:00-5:30

We are delighted to invite you to a book party celebration and talk with the co-editors for Latinx Environmentalisms: Place, Justice, and the Decolonial on November 21, 2019 from 4:00 to 5:30 pm in the EMU Maple Room. Light refreshments will be served. The event is free and open to the public. Books will be available for purchase and signing. Please share widely with colleagues, students, and friends.

We hope that you will be able to join us for this wonderful event!

All the best,

David Vázquez and Sarah Wald

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Spring 2019 CLLAS Notes

0519-CLLAS-newsletter_FINAL

The 2019 spring edition of CLLAS Notes, our twice-yearly newsletter, is now available online and in print.

History professor Carlos Aguirre reviews his tenure as CLLAS interim director and takes us on a look ahead at the new two-year plan for CLLAS, a series of initiatives and events under the theme “The Politics of Language in the Americas.”

Learn about Judge Yassmin Barrios’s visit to the UO campus in March and her lecture on “Justice and Reparation in Guatemala,” where she talked about her experience with the High Risk Crime Tribunal over which she presides. Check out the accounts of graduate student research in Peru and Guatemala and faculty research in Bolivia. Read about CLLAS founding director Lynn Stephen’s experience as the president of the Latin American Studies Association.

CLLAS event planner & project manager Feather Crawford fills us in on the January CLLAS Town Hall with Mae Ngai, the 2018-19 Wayne Morse Center Chair. And thanks to Crawford’s excellent reporting, you can find out more about why migrants are fleeing Honduras when you read her account of historian Dana Frank’s detailed talk held in April.

The 2019 Spring edition of CLLAS Notes, Volume 10, Issue 2 includes:

  • Letter from Interim Director Carlos Aguirre
  • “Justice and Reparation in Guatemala”—Judge Yassmin Barrios’s lecture about justice & human rights in Guatemala
  • “Lynn Stephen Completes Her Tenure as LASA President”
  • Faculty Research—“Strugging with Sustainability: Guarayo Cultural and Environmental Management Challenges”
  • Graduate Research—“Responses to Gendered Violence in Costa Rica and Guatemala”
  • Graduate Research—“Sounds of Power: Peruvian colonial pipe organs in the interplay of cultures”
  • Graduate Research—“Environmental Justice and the Local Effects of Glacier Melt in the Peruvian Cordillera Huayhuash”
  • News & Book Notes
  • Event Reports
  • 2019-20 Grant Recipients

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Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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CLLAS Common Reading Brunch with author Helena María Viramontes / Photos by Mike Bragg / Courtesy of the UO Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

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