Public Policy

Undocumented and DACAmented Mental Health

Blog Post by Eric Garcia, PhD, Senior Staff Therapist & Latinx Student Specialist
from the UO Counseling Center website at: https://counseling.uoregon.edu/undocumented-and-dacamented-mental-health

see also: https://cllas.uoregon.edu/resources/daca-info/latinx-undocumented-student-specialists/

Photo by Molly Adams (CC BY 2.0)

It goes without saying that being a dreamer or undocumented can feel like a nightmare. You are tasked with moving forward without the same opportunities provided to others around you. If you have DACA, you’re only able to plan two years of your life a time (assuming there are no abrupt executive orders). If you are mixed-status, you may be greatly worried about your family and loved ones. If you are undocumented and do not consider yourself a dreamer or DACAmented, you may have well-intentioned people (such as myself) who do not always address your unique experiences.

Some of these identities may mean that you miss out on experiences like driving a car, studying abroad, or receiving financial aid. You most likely also have to deal with anti-immigrant rhetoric or experience overt racism and xenophobia in your daily life. Lastly, you may feel the need to keep this aspect of your life to yourself, while only letting a trusted few know what you are going through. I name these experiences not to bring more worries to you, but rather, to acknowledge in amazement the profound challenges that you continue to surmount, as well as to offer some guidance and resources as you continue to press on. › Continue reading

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CLLAS Town Hall with Mae Ngai: “Citizenship and Denaturalization in the Era of US Nationalism”

January 17, 2019
4:00 pmto5:30 pm

Mae Ngai

 

 

Save-the-date

Knight Library

Browsing Room

CLLAS Town Hall with Mae Ngai

“Citizenship and Denaturalization in the Era of US Nationalism”

Mae Ngai is the 2018-19 Wayne Morse Chair. She is the Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies and Professor of History, Columbia University. Her research focuses on immigration, citizenship, and nationalism. Ngai is the author of Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America (2004), which won six major book awards; and The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America (2010). Ngai has written on immigration history and policy for The Washington Post, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Nation,and the Boston Review. Before becoming a historian, she was a labor-union organizer and educator in New York City, working for District 65-UAW and the Consortium for Worker Education. Her upcoming book is Yellow and Gold: The Chinese Mining Diaspora, 1848-1908, a study of Chinese gold miners and racial politics in nineteenth-century California, the Australian colony of Victoria, and the South African Transvaal.

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PPPM Becomes an Innovative Research Hub for Diversity in Planning, Policy, and Design

Editor’s Note: Professor Gerardo Sandoval is a member of the CLLAS Executive Board.

October 24, 2018—College of Design / School of Planning, Public Policy, and Management

PPPM Becomes an Innovative Research Hub for Diversity in Planning, Policy, and Design

Associate Professor Gerardo Sandoval and Assistant Professor José Melendez.

Oregon is positioned to become a leader for researching diversity, equity, and inclusion in public processes and engagement, and the College of Design’s School of Planning, Public Policy and Management (PPPM) will be at the forefront.

Three leading scholars in diversity research are joining forces for the new Engaging Diverse Communities team at PPPM.

Associate Professor Gerardo Sandoval is in his eighth year at the University of Oregon, and researches public engagement and participation in policymaking and planning. This summer, the College of Design appointed Sandoval as the first-ever Dean’s Fellow for Diversity. › Continue reading

Monday, October 29th, 2018 Academics, Advisory Board, News, Public Policy No Comments

Vulnerable But Not Broken: Psychosocial Challenges and Resilience Pathways among Unaccompanied Children from Central America

Vulnerable But Not Broken Final Report Aug 2018

Vulnerable But Not Broken: Psychosocial Challenges and Resilience Pathways among Unaccompanied Children from Central America

© 2018 Immigration Psychology Working Group

This report provides an overview on the myriad issues facing unaccompanied children from Central America apprehended at the Southwest border of the United States. The document highlights these children’s ability to overcome challenging histories and adapt to the changes in familial and social environment that life in the United States presents, and identifies some of the key supportive resources that can help them to do so. The psychosocial aspects of this humanitarian crisis are reviewed, outlining priority areas for future research and providing recommendations for culturally and developmentally informed practice, programs, and legal advocacy. 

Monday, August 20th, 2018 Human Rights, News, Public Policy, Publications No Comments

Tobin Hansen writes about the psychological costs of deportation

This article from Around the O discusses the research of doctoral candidate Tobin Hansen, whose work was supported by CLLAS through a 2017 Graduate Student Research Grant. Hansen has been the recipient of many awards for his research and writing.

Researcher writes about the psychological costs of deportation

January 24, 2018 — For thousands of immigrants who arrived here as young children, the U.S. is the only country they can remember. This can make deportation especially crushing.

Tobin Hansen, a UO doctoral candidate in anthropology, spent 18 months in northern Mexico living with deported adults who had arrived in the U.S. before the age of 13. He wrote about the experience for The Conversation. › Continue reading

Environmental Justice, Race, and Public Lands: A Symposium

May 9, 2018toMay 11, 2018

 

Full Schedule: https://blogs.uoregon.edu/ejrpl/

Cosponsored by CLLAS

This symposium focuses on issues of equity and environmental justice on public lands. The event brings together practitioners engaged in
diversity, equity, and inclusion work throughout the Pacific Northwest with scholars focused on race, environmental justice, and/or Indigeneity as they relate to public lands.

  • Wednesday, May 9th @ 6:30pm in the Many Nations Longhouse: Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples Lecture featuring Dr. Karletta Chief and Dr. Margaret Hiza-Redsteer.
  • Thursday, May 10th @ 7:30pm in Straub 156: Dr. Kyle Powys Whyte will deliver a keynote entitled “Ironic Storytelling for Public Lands: Indigenizing Justice and Coalition-Building.”
  • Friday, May 11th @ 7:30pm in Straub 156: Dr. Carolyn Finney, the author of Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors, will deliver the final keynote.

The symposium also includes panels on Practioner Perspectives on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion on Public Lands, Historical perspectives on Race, Environmental Justice, and Public Lands, Decolonizing Public Lands, and Labor as Public Lands Environmental Justice Issue. › Continue reading

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Saturday, January 6th, 2018 Conference, Events, Native American, Public Policy No Comments



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