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Spring 2019 CLLAS Notes

0519-CLLAS-newsletter_FINAL

The 2019 spring edition of CLLAS Notes, our twice-yearly newsletter, is now available online and in print.

History professor Carlos Aguirre reviews his tenure as CLLAS interim director and takes us on a look ahead at the new two-year plan for CLLAS, a series of initiatives and events under the theme “The Politics of Language in the Americas.”

Learn about Judge Yassmin Barrios’s visit to the UO campus in March and her lecture on “Justice and Reparation in Guatemala,” where she talked about her experience with the High Risk Crime Tribunal over which she presides. Check out the accounts of graduate student research in Peru and Guatemala and faculty research in Bolivia. Read about CLLAS founding director Lynn Stephen’s experience as the president of the Latin American Studies Association.

CLLAS event planner & project manager Feather Crawford fills us in on the January CLLAS Town Hall with Mae Ngai, the 2018-19 Wayne Morse Center Chair. And thanks to Crawford’s excellent reporting, you can find out more about why migrants are fleeing Honduras when you read her account of historian Dana Frank’s detailed talk held in April.

The 2019 Spring edition of CLLAS Notes, Volume 10, Issue 2 includes:

  • Letter from Interim Director Carlos Aguirre
  • “Justice and Reparation in Guatemala”—Judge Yassmin Barrios’s lecture about justice & human rights in Guatemala
  • “Lynn Stephen Completes Her Tenure as LASA President”
  • Faculty Research—“Strugging with Sustainability: Guarayo Cultural and Environmental Management Challenges”
  • Graduate Research—“Responses to Gendered Violence in Costa Rica and Guatemala”
  • Graduate Research—“Sounds of Power: Peruvian colonial pipe organs in the interplay of cultures”
  • Graduate Research—“Environmental Justice and the Local Effects of Glacier Melt in the Peruvian Cordillera Huayhuash”
  • News & Book Notes
  • Event Reports
  • 2019-20 Grant Recipients

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NALAC awards artist grant to Ernesto Martínez

February 20, 2019—Ernesto Javier Martínez has been awarded a $5,000 NFA Artist Grant from the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC). An associate professor in the UO Department of Ethnic Studies, Martínez is one of 43 grantees from among 400 applicants to be selected for the 13th cycle of the NALAC Fund for the Arts grant program.

Ernesto Martínez

According to the grant program manager, “These 43 recipients are recognized for their artistic excellence in pursuit of social justice through the arts and were selected from a pool of over 400 applications by a national peer panel process involving 45 arts experts representing diverse disciplines, regions and ethnicities.”

Martínez received the grant “to support the continuation of the Femeniños project, a children’s book and short film series highlighting the experiences of queer Latino/x boys and the families who bear witness to their lives.

This project began in 2017 as a collaboration with the San Francisco-based children’s book author Maya Christina González and has expanded to work with the Los Angeles-based independent film director Adelina Anthony and Oregon-based Hollywood film director Omar Naim. Through the Femeniños project, the artist aims to empower queer Latinx youth through stories that capture their imaginations, embody their cultural roots and represent queer lives in a positive light.”

CLLAS is one of several UO units that have provided grant support to Professor Martínez for his work on this project. In 2018, Martínez published the children’s book When We Love Someone We Sing to Them,which reframes a cultural tradition to include LGBTQ experience. La Serenata is a film adaption of the book. 

“Both the screenplay and the book,” Martínez said, “tell the story of a Mexican-American boy who learns from his parents about serenatas and why demonstrating romantic affection proudly, publicly, and through song is such a treasured Mexican tradition. One day, the boy asks his parents if there is a song for a boy who loves a boy. The parents, surprised by the question and unsure of how to answer, must decide how to honor their son and how to reimagine a beloved tradition.”

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Why are the Migrants Fleeing Honduras?

April 10, 2019
4:00 pmto5:30 pm

Knight Library, Browsing Room, 1501 Kincaid St., UO campus

“Why are the Migrants Fleeing Honduras? Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup”

Speaker: Dana Frank
Professor of History Emerita
University of California, Santa Cruz

In this presentation Dana Frank will discuss her new book, The Long Honduran Night: Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup, which examines Honduras since the 2009 coup that deposed democratically-elected President Manuel Zelaya. In the book, she interweaves her personal experiences in post-coup Honduras and in the US Congress with a larger analysis of the coup regime and its ongoing repression, Honduran opposition movements, US policy in support of the regime, and Congressional challenges to that policy. Her book helps us understand the root causes of the immigrant caravans of Hondurans leaving for the US, and the destructive impact of US policy.

Dana Frank is Professor of History Emerita  at the University of California, Santa Cruz.  Herbooks include Bananeras: Women Transforming the Banana Unions of Latin America, which focuses on Honduras, and Buy American: The Untold Story of Economic Nationalism.  Her writings on human rights and U.S. policy in post-coup Honduras have appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Miami Herald, Houston Chronicle, The Nation, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Politico Magazine, and many other publications, and she has been interviewed by the Washington Post, New Yorker, New York Times, National Public Radio, Univsion, Latino USAregularly on Democracy Now!and on other outlets.  Professor Frank  has testified about Honduras before the US House of Representatives, the California Assembly, and the Canadian Parliament.

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Friday, January 4th, 2019 Books, Events, News No Comments

PPPM Becomes an Innovative Research Hub for Diversity in Planning, Policy, and Design

Editor’s Note: Professor Gerardo Sandoval is a member of the CLLAS Executive Board.

October 24, 2018—College of Design / School of Planning, Public Policy, and Management

PPPM Becomes an Innovative Research Hub for Diversity in Planning, Policy, and Design

Associate Professor Gerardo Sandoval and Assistant Professor José Melendez.

Oregon is positioned to become a leader for researching diversity, equity, and inclusion in public processes and engagement, and the College of Design’s School of Planning, Public Policy and Management (PPPM) will be at the forefront.

Three leading scholars in diversity research are joining forces for the new Engaging Diverse Communities team at PPPM.

Associate Professor Gerardo Sandoval is in his eighth year at the University of Oregon, and researches public engagement and participation in policymaking and planning. This summer, the College of Design appointed Sandoval as the first-ever Dean’s Fellow for Diversity. › Continue reading

Monday, October 29th, 2018 Academics, Advisory Board, News, Public Policy No Comments

New! Huerto de la Familia Incubator Farm Booth at Saturday Market

Huerto de la Familia has launched a brand-new farm booth incubator at Eugene’s Saturday Farmer’s Market.

The first business to participate is 10 Stars Farm, a Latinx-family farm owned by Florentino and Estela. They will be at Saturday Market every week through the end of the season except for Saturday, August 25th. You can also find 10 Stars Farm at the Tuesday and Thursday markets.

Estela and Florentino are graduates of Huerto de la Familia’s 2017 Cambios Business Class, where they attended 12 weeks of three-hour classes in order to successfully complete their business plan.

Marissa Zarate, executive director of Huerto, notes that Estela and Florentino are proud of their organically grown (but not certified) produce and can’t wait to share it with your family. She says the name “10 Stars Farm,” was thought up by their son and represents them and their eight children. 

CLLAS has a history of relationship to the nonprofit organization Huerto de la Familia.

Thursday, August 23rd, 2018 Farmworker Rights, News No Comments

Vulnerable But Not Broken: Psychosocial Challenges and Resilience Pathways among Unaccompanied Children from Central America

Vulnerable But Not Broken Final Report Aug 2018

Vulnerable But Not Broken: Psychosocial Challenges and Resilience Pathways among Unaccompanied Children from Central America

© 2018 Immigration Psychology Working Group

This report provides an overview on the myriad issues facing unaccompanied children from Central America apprehended at the Southwest border of the United States. The document highlights these children’s ability to overcome challenging histories and adapt to the changes in familial and social environment that life in the United States presents, and identifies some of the key supportive resources that can help them to do so. The psychosocial aspects of this humanitarian crisis are reviewed, outlining priority areas for future research and providing recommendations for culturally and developmentally informed practice, programs, and legal advocacy. 

Monday, August 20th, 2018 Human Rights, News, Public Policy, Publications No Comments



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