Human Rights

CLLAS Town Hall with Mae Ngai: “Citizenship and Denaturalization in the Era of US Nationalism”

January 17, 2019
4:00 pmto5:30 pm

 

 

Knight Library, Browsing Room
1501 Kincaid St.

CLLAS Town Hall with Mae Ngai

The Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS) is sponsoring a Town Hall on January 17 at 4 pm with Mae Ngai, the 2018-19 Wayne Morse Chair. The discussion will focus on “Citizenship and Denaturalization in the Era of US Nationalism” and will be moderated by Rocío Zambrana, associate professor in the UO Department of Philosophy. Location is the Knight Library Browsing Room.

Mae Ngai is the Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies and professor of history, Columbia University. Her research focuses on immigration, citizenship, and nationalism. Ngai is the author of Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America (2004), which won six major book awards, and The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America(2010). Ngai has written on immigration history and policy for The Washington Post, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Nation, and the Boston Review. Before becoming a historian, she was a labor-union organizer and educator in New York City, working for District 65-UAW and the Consortium for Worker Education. Her upcoming book is Yellow and Gold: The Chinese Mining Diaspora, 1848-1908, a study of Chinese gold miners and racial politics in nineteenth-century California, the Australian colony of Victoria, and the South African Transvaal.

See also this article on Mae Ngai from Around the O: Professor of immigration history named 2018-19 Morse Chair

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Judge Yassmin Barrios, “Justice and Reparation in Guatemala: Challenges and Possibilities”

March 5, 2019
6:00 pmto7:30 pm

156 Straub Hall, 1451 Onyx St., UO campus
Free & open to the public

Justice and Reparation in Guatemala: Challenges and Possibilities

CLLAS Inaugural Lecture in Latinx and Latin American Studies

Please join us for the CLLAS Inaugural Lecture in Latinx and Latin American Studies with Judge Yassmin Barrios. Judge Barrios will deliver her address, “Justice and Reparation in Guatemala: Challenges and Possibilities,” in 156 Straub Hall at 6pm on Tuesday, March 5th.

Judge Yassmin Barrios is president of one of the two Guatemalan High Risk Crimes Tribunals. She was the presiding judge in the case of General Efraín Ríos Montt, convicting the dictator for genocide against the indigenous Ixil Mayans of Guatemala.

Sponsored by the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies and cosponsored by the President’s Office, the Oregon Humanities Center, the Center for the Study of Women in Society, the Latin American Studies Program, and the Departments of History, Political Science, and Romance Languages.

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Undocumented and DACAmented Mental Health

Blog Post by Eric Garcia, PhD, Senior Staff Therapist & Latinx Student Specialist
from the UO Counseling Center website at: https://counseling.uoregon.edu/undocumented-and-dacamented-mental-health

see also: https://cllas.uoregon.edu/resources/daca-info/latinx-undocumented-student-specialists/

Photo by Molly Adams (CC BY 2.0)

It goes without saying that being a dreamer or undocumented can feel like a nightmare. You are tasked with moving forward without the same opportunities provided to others around you. If you have DACA, you’re only able to plan two years of your life a time (assuming there are no abrupt executive orders). If you are mixed-status, you may be greatly worried about your family and loved ones. If you are undocumented and do not consider yourself a dreamer or DACAmented, you may have well-intentioned people (such as myself) who do not always address your unique experiences.

Some of these identities may mean that you miss out on experiences like driving a car, studying abroad, or receiving financial aid. You most likely also have to deal with anti-immigrant rhetoric or experience overt racism and xenophobia in your daily life. Lastly, you may feel the need to keep this aspect of your life to yourself, while only letting a trusted few know what you are going through. I name these experiences not to bring more worries to you, but rather, to acknowledge in amazement the profound challenges that you continue to surmount, as well as to offer some guidance and resources as you continue to press on. › Continue reading

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Vulnerable But Not Broken: Psychosocial Challenges and Resilience Pathways among Unaccompanied Children from Central America

Vulnerable But Not Broken Final Report Aug 2018

Vulnerable But Not Broken: Psychosocial Challenges and Resilience Pathways among Unaccompanied Children from Central America

© 2018 Immigration Psychology Working Group

This report provides an overview on the myriad issues facing unaccompanied children from Central America apprehended at the Southwest border of the United States. The document highlights these children’s ability to overcome challenging histories and adapt to the changes in familial and social environment that life in the United States presents, and identifies some of the key supportive resources that can help them to do so. The psychosocial aspects of this humanitarian crisis are reviewed, outlining priority areas for future research and providing recommendations for culturally and developmentally informed practice, programs, and legal advocacy. 

Monday, August 20th, 2018 Human Rights, News, Public Policy, Publications No Comments

Argentina’s history has sinister echoes in America today

Chris Chavez

This op-ed by UO journalism professor Christopher Chávez appeared in the Eugene Register-Guard Sunday edition on August 5, 2018.

Source: Argentina’s history has sinister echoes in America today

“I recently took a trip to Victoria, a small town about an hour outside of Rosario, Argentina, where I’m teaching a course for the University of Oregon. On a street just off the main plaza, there’s a striking mural dedicated to Las Madres, the mothers whose children were either killed or disappeared during Argentina’s “Dirty War,” which lasted from 1976 to 1983. On one side of the mural are the disappeared, blindfolded and despondent. On the other side are the mothers, marching in solidarity and carrying a banner with the word “Justicia” (Justice).” For the full text of this op-ed, go to: Argentina’s history has sinister echoes in America today

7-Year Update from the CAPACES Leadership Institute

Current staff from left to right. Top row: Eduardo Serrano, Edward Gutierrez, Jaime Arredondo, Alex Buron, and Berenice Vargas. Bottom row: Fabiola Ramos, Ines Peña, and Maricela Andrade. Not pictured: Juan Diego Ramos

 

Our First Seven Years

Seven years ago this month, community leaders took a risk, and created the CAPACES Leadership Institute to prepare leaders with the political consciousness and capacity needed to lead and support social justice work. On this special occasion, we would like to share a few of our successes so far and ask that you continue to renew your support of our work.
 
September of 2012: The CLI launches the TURNO youth leadership program to create a path for youth embrace and prepare for long-term movement leadership. The program began with ten youth and one part-time staff. This next school year we will have 2.5 FTE dedicated to the program and expect to serve well over thirty youth.
 
September 2013: Over 75 community supporters gather to unveil the CLI’s “Wings of History and Hope” mural, the first publicly displayed mural in Woodburn. Over 150 volunteers helped make this happen, both changing the law in Woodburn and painting the mural. Today Woodburn has multiple publicly displayed murals.
 
June 2014: CLI launches its “national” leadership development work by testing out it’s Seven Dimensions program with a cohort of 20 leaders from the Fair Immigration Reform Movement. Seven Dimensions is a three-plus day gathering where participants engage with each other about the dilemmas of making and keeping a long-term commitment to the social justice movement work.  Last month, we ran our third cohort and have now engaged over 75 leaders in the program. We plan on running another cohort this fall with leaders from our sister organizations and allies.
 
May 2015: TURNO youth lead the way in passing a $63 million Woodburn School Bond, that hadn’t passed since 1994. This fall TURNO youth will be at it again, working to defeat the anti-immigrant Measure 105, which would repeal our state’s 30 year old sanctuary law.
 
September 2017: The CLI launches its DACA Advocacy Capacity building project to boost the capacity of DACA youth to mobilize their communities. Here is what one of the youth had to say about their experience: “I can honestly say that the fire that was awaken in me through the opportunity of working for CAPACES and the leader they created in me has been thrilling. The most rewarding thing for me through this journey has been the connection with real DREAMers whom feel the same way I do. It’s been a hardship knowing congress didn’t passed a Clean Dream Act. But, I know our fight continues and one day we will get that solution we need for all eleven thousands of us DREAMers and undocumented youth. They tried to bury us. But, they didn’t know we were seeds.”
 
March 2018-  The CLI launches Oregon’s first bilingual public service training program–People’s Representatives–to bridge the Latinx leadership gap in public service bodies (elected and non-elected) in the Mid-Willamette Valley. 
 
As you can tell, we’ve had a busy seven years.  Our work has impacted many individuals, but more importantly the communities they live in.  We couldn’t have done this without your support and hope you can continue to partner with us in our journey. Thank you.

Jaime Arredondo

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Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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2019 Judge Yassmin Barrios Lecture / photos by Jack Liu

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