Farmworker Rights

Fair Trade Rebels: UO graduate Lindsay Naylor has a new book on coffee production in Chiapas

Fair Trade Rebels: Coffee Production and Struggles for Autonomy in Chiapas, by Lindsay Naylor. Diverse Economies and Livable Worlds Series. (University of Minnesota Press, 2019)

Lindsay Naylor is an assistant professor, Department of Geography & Spatial Sciences, College of Earth, Ocean, & Environment at the University of Delaware. As a graduate student at the University of Oregon, she was the recipient of a 2010 CLLAS Graduate Student Research Grant for “Harnessing Multiple Movements: The Intersection of Fair Trade and the Zapatista Movement in Chiapas, Mexico.”

Naylor’s new book is titled Fair Trade Rebels: Coffee Production and Struggles for Autonomy in Chiapas.

Synopsis: Is fair trade really fair? Who is it for, and who gets to decide? Fair Trade Rebels addresses such questions in a new way by shifting the focus from the abstract concept of fair trade–and whether it is “working”–to the perspectives of small farmers. It examines the everyday experiences of resistance and agricultural practice among the campesinos/as of Chiapas, Mexico, who struggle for dignified livelihoods in self-declared autonomous communities in the highlands, confronting inequalities locally in what is really a global corporate agricultural chain.

Based on extensive fieldwork, Fair Trade Rebels draws on stories from Chiapas that have emerged from the farmers’ interaction with both the fair-trade-certified marketplace and state violence. Here Lindsay Naylor discusses the racialized and historical backdrop of coffee production and rebel autonomy in the highlands, underscores the divergence of movements for fairer trade and the so-called alternative certified market, traces the network of such movements from the highlands and into the United States, and evaluates existing food sovereignty and diverse economic exchanges. Putting decolonial thinking in conversation with diverse economies theory, Fair Trade Rebels evaluates fair trade not by the measure of its success or failure but through a unique, place-based approach that expands our understanding of the relationship between fair trade, autonomy, and economic development.

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Panel Discussion — Immigrants out, “Guestworkers” in: A Hidden History of the Trump Years

April 24, 2019
4:00 pmto5:30 pm

Gerlinger Lounge, 1468 University St.
Passover-friendly refreshments will be served

Organized by Julie Weise, 2018-19 Wayne Morse Resident Scholar

In the United States and across Europe, nation-states are slamming their doors on immigrants and refugees. This nationalist reaction to the diversity that globalization has brought seems to portend depressed immigration levels for the foreseeable future. Yet employers still demand immigrant labor in a growing economy. Even as U.S. President Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant rhetoric and policies drove undocumented workers deeper into the shadows, his administration also approved a record-breaking quarter-million temporary agricultural worker visas, known as H2A or “guestworkers.” Similar patterns are in effect around the globe.

In this panel, historians join key Oregon advocates for both agricultural and workers’ interests to contextualize the “guestworker” phenomenon locally and globally, and ask whether it represents the future of immigrant labor in the United States and beyond.

Panelists

Michael Dale is the founder and executive director of the Northwest Workers’ Justice Project, and non-profit law firm that represents low wage, immigrant and contingent workers with respect to civil employment law problems.  He worked for 25 years as an Oregon legal aid attorney, and helped establish the Oregon Law Center in 1995.  Over the last ten years he has been engaged in extensive litigation over the rules governing the use of H-2B temporary workers, winning cases in the 3rd, 11th and 4th Circuit Courts of Appeals.

Christoph Rass is one of Germany’s leading historians of twentieth-century European labor migration. A professor at Osnabrück University’s Institute for Migration and Intercultural Studies, Rass concentrates on institutions and knowledge production in migration regimes, forced migrations, and GIS-based modeling of migration patterns. Rass is a recent recipient of the Kalliope Prize for Migration Research from the German Emigration Center.

Jeff Stone is the CEO of Oregon Association of Nurseries and formerly Chief of Staff to Metro Council. Stone has a BS from the UO in political science and has deep experience in Oregon and national political affairs. He has served as an executive and board member of numerous business and nonprofit organizations.

Julie M. Weise is a scholar of twentieth-century Mexican migration history in global context. An associate professor of history at the University of Oregon, Weise is the author of the prize-winning Corazón de Dixie: Mexicanos in the U.S. South since 1910 (UNC Press, 2015). Her current book project, “Citizenship Displaced: Migrant Political Cultures in the Era of State Control,” places postwar Mexican migration history in conversation with parallel histories in Europe and southern Africa.

Cosponsored by the UO Office of International Affairs, the UO Department of History, and the Global Studies Institute’s Global Oregon Faculty Collaboration Fund. Part of the Wayne Morse Center’s 2017-19 theme, Borders, Migration, and Belonging. The Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics encourages civic engagement and inspires enlightened dialogue by bringing students, scholars, activists, policymakers, and communities together to discuss issues affecting Oregon, our nation, and the world. 

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Tuesday, January 1st, 2019 Events, Farmworker Rights, Public Policy No Comments

New! Huerto de la Familia Incubator Farm Booth at Saturday Market

Huerto de la Familia has launched a brand-new farm booth incubator at Eugene’s Saturday Farmer’s Market.

The first business to participate is 10 Stars Farm, a Latinx-family farm owned by Florentino and Estela. They will be at Saturday Market every week through the end of the season except for Saturday, August 25th. You can also find 10 Stars Farm at the Tuesday and Thursday markets.

Estela and Florentino are graduates of Huerto de la Familia’s 2017 Cambios Business Class, where they attended 12 weeks of three-hour classes in order to successfully complete their business plan.

Marissa Zarate, executive director of Huerto, notes that Estela and Florentino are proud of their organically grown (but not certified) produce and can’t wait to share it with your family. She says the name “10 Stars Farm,” was thought up by their son and represents them and their eight children. 

CLLAS has a history of relationship to the nonprofit organization Huerto de la Familia.

Thursday, August 23rd, 2018 Farmworker Rights, News No Comments

Teach-In & Film Screening with director Peter Bratt: Dolores

October 22, 2018
11:00 amto12:00 pm
4:00 pmto6:30 pm

 

 

 

CLLAS Teach-In: Film and Activism with film director Peter Bratt
Monday, October 22, 11:00am-12:00pm 
Crater Lake Rooms, EMU

CLLAS Film Screening & Discussion with film director Peter Bratt: DOLORES
Monday, October 22, 4:00pm-6:30pm 
Redwood Auditorium, EMU

DOLORES HUERTA 

Dolores Huerta is among the most important, yet least known, activists in American history. An equal partner in co-founding the first farm workers unions with Cesar Chavez, her enormous contributions have gone largely unrecognized. Dolores tirelessly led the fight for racial and labor justice alongside Chavez, becoming one of the most defiant feminists of the twentieth century—and she continues the fight to this day, at 87. With intimate and unprecedented access to this intensely private mother to eleven, the film reveals the raw, personal stakes involved in committing one’s life to social change. Directed by Peter Bratt.  › Continue reading

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Saturday, August 18th, 2018 Events, Farmworker Rights No Comments

7-Year Update from the CAPACES Leadership Institute

Current staff from left to right. Top row: Eduardo Serrano, Edward Gutierrez, Jaime Arredondo, Alex Buron, and Berenice Vargas. Bottom row: Fabiola Ramos, Ines Peña, and Maricela Andrade. Not pictured: Juan Diego Ramos

 

Our First Seven Years

Seven years ago this month, community leaders took a risk, and created the CAPACES Leadership Institute to prepare leaders with the political consciousness and capacity needed to lead and support social justice work. On this special occasion, we would like to share a few of our successes so far and ask that you continue to renew your support of our work.
 
September of 2012: The CLI launches the TURNO youth leadership program to create a path for youth embrace and prepare for long-term movement leadership. The program began with ten youth and one part-time staff. This next school year we will have 2.5 FTE dedicated to the program and expect to serve well over thirty youth.
 
September 2013: Over 75 community supporters gather to unveil the CLI’s “Wings of History and Hope” mural, the first publicly displayed mural in Woodburn. Over 150 volunteers helped make this happen, both changing the law in Woodburn and painting the mural. Today Woodburn has multiple publicly displayed murals.
 
June 2014: CLI launches its “national” leadership development work by testing out it’s Seven Dimensions program with a cohort of 20 leaders from the Fair Immigration Reform Movement. Seven Dimensions is a three-plus day gathering where participants engage with each other about the dilemmas of making and keeping a long-term commitment to the social justice movement work.  Last month, we ran our third cohort and have now engaged over 75 leaders in the program. We plan on running another cohort this fall with leaders from our sister organizations and allies.
 
May 2015: TURNO youth lead the way in passing a $63 million Woodburn School Bond, that hadn’t passed since 1994. This fall TURNO youth will be at it again, working to defeat the anti-immigrant Measure 105, which would repeal our state’s 30 year old sanctuary law.
 
September 2017: The CLI launches its DACA Advocacy Capacity building project to boost the capacity of DACA youth to mobilize their communities. Here is what one of the youth had to say about their experience: “I can honestly say that the fire that was awaken in me through the opportunity of working for CAPACES and the leader they created in me has been thrilling. The most rewarding thing for me through this journey has been the connection with real DREAMers whom feel the same way I do. It’s been a hardship knowing congress didn’t passed a Clean Dream Act. But, I know our fight continues and one day we will get that solution we need for all eleven thousands of us DREAMers and undocumented youth. They tried to bury us. But, they didn’t know we were seeds.”
 
March 2018-  The CLI launches Oregon’s first bilingual public service training program–People’s Representatives–to bridge the Latinx leadership gap in public service bodies (elected and non-elected) in the Mid-Willamette Valley. 
 
As you can tell, we’ve had a busy seven years.  Our work has impacted many individuals, but more importantly the communities they live in.  We couldn’t have done this without your support and hope you can continue to partner with us in our journey. Thank you.

Jaime Arredondo

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