Visiting Scholar

Pulitzer winner Jose Antonio Vargas to be in residence at UO

Pulitzer winner Jose Antonio Vargas to be in residence at UO / Around the O 

October 5, 2017 — At age 16, Jose Antonio Vargas went to the motor vehicles department to get a driver’s license and discovered he was in the U.S. illegally.

Jose Antonio Vargas

The green card he’d been given by family when he moved to America from the Philippines as a child was a fake. For years Vargas kept his status a secret, even as he became a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist whose writing appeared in publications such as the San Francisco Chronicle, Rolling Stone and the New Yorker.

Vargas will be telling his story to University of Oregon audiences as the 2017-18 Wayne Morse Chair of Law and Politics. On Oct. 24, he will give a public lecture, “Define American: My Life as an Undocumented Immigrant.” The event begins at 7 p.m. in Room 156, Straub Hall.

In 2011, Vargas wrote a groundbreaking essay for New York Times Magazine revealing himself as undocumented and appeared on the cover of Time magazine in conjunction with a follow-up story he wrote. Some of the ramifications were immediate: He lost the driver’s license he’d finally managed to obtain, and he had to have difficult conversations with close friends to whom he’d never told his secret. His status makes it unsafe to have a fixed address, so he travels most of the time, living in hotel rooms and staying with friends. › Continue reading

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Mixed-Status Families In the US/Mexico Borderlands

October 3, 2016
1:30 pmto3:00 pm

 

castaneda_talk_final2Knight Library
Browsing Room

Mixed-Status Families In the US/Mexico Borderlands: Inequality and the Meanings of Citizenship in the Contemporary Migration Experience

A talk by Dr. Heide Castañeda (Anthropology, University of South Florida)

Monday October 3, 1:30-3pm

There are 2.3 million mixed-status families in the US, in which the undocumented legal status of some members influences opportunities and resources for all. A focus on individuals in law and policy largely overlooks cumulative ripple effects on families, although individuals are always embedded within these complex social units. This talk examines how mixed-status families experience specific policies related to health care, education, and mobility, and seeks to understand how they collectively navigate opportunities and obstacles. It is necessary to understand the experiences of these families – including and especially the impacts on some 4.5 million US citizen children – in order to ensure equitable application of policy and to reduce disparities. › Continue reading

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Now available: Spring 2016 CLLAS Notes

0516_CLLAS_Notes_WEB_Page_1Spring 2016 CLLAS_Notes

CLLAS founding director Lynn Stephen passes the torch of leadership and highlights the history and many achievements of the past nine years in the formation and growth of the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies.

This spring issue of CLLAS Notes also includes greetings from the 2016-17 interim director, Gabriela Martínez, an associate professor in the School of Journalism and Communication. You’ll learn about Anabel Lopez-Salinas’s experiences as CLLAS Visiting Scholar. UO graduate student Lidiana Soto tells her moving personal story about crossing the border in her comments made as a panelist at the CSWS Northwest Women Writers Symposium.

Read about CLLAS-supported faculty and graduate student research and news and updates on research action projects, our Latino Roots Project, and faculty and graduate student achievements. Updates on CLLAS events include the CLLAS spring forum “Latin@s and the 2016 Election: Policies, Immigration, and Action,” a concert by Zapotec hip-hop artist Mare Advertencia Lirika, and a visit by artist Hector Villegas.

All this and more are included in this spring 2016 edition of CLLAS Notes, the twice-yearly newsletter for the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies. Watch for yours soon in your campus or home mailbox, or view it now online.

“Exploring Mexican Immigrants’ Engagement in Oregon Civic Life,” with Anabel Lopez-Salinas

April 11, 2016
12:00 pmto1:30 pm

Anabel-Lopez-Salinas_2Condon 330
1321 Kincaid St.
UO campus

CLLAS Visiting Scholar Presentation

Anabel Lopez-Salinas is a native of Oaxaca, Mexico. She holds a master’s degree in regional and technological development from the Instituto Tecnológico de Oaxaca. Her focus was on economic development and migration between the United States and the Mixteca, the poorest region of Oaxaca and the birthplace of her parents. In 2010 Anabel came to Oregon to pursue a PhD in public affairs and policy at Portland State University. Since her arrival, she has worked and volunteered with the Latino immigrant community in Oregon and served as board secretary of the Beaverton Hispanic Center. While working on her dissertation, entitled “Exploring Transnational Economic, Social, and Political Participation of Mexican Immigrants in Oregon,” she has interviewed immigrants and public officials on the economic, political, and social incorporation of immigrants in Oregon. While at the University of Oregon, she will help coordinate the CLLAS Latino Civic Participation Project (LCPP).

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Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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2017 Latino Roots Celebration

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