Conference

Environmental Justice, Race, and Public Lands: A Symposium

May 9, 2018toMay 11, 2018

 

Full Schedule: https://blogs.uoregon.edu/ejrpl/

Cosponsored by CLLAS

This symposium focuses on issues of equity and environmental justice on public lands. The event brings together practitioners engaged in
diversity, equity, and inclusion work throughout the Pacific Northwest with scholars focused on race, environmental justice, and/or Indigeneity as they relate to public lands.

  • Wednesday, May 9th @ 6:30pm in the Many Nations Longhouse: Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples Lecture featuring Dr. Karletta Chief and Dr. Margaret Hiza-Redsteer.
  • Thursday, May 10th @ 7:30pm in Straub 156: Dr. Kyle Powys Whyte will deliver a keynote entitled “Ironic Storytelling for Public Lands: Indigenizing Justice and Coalition-Building.”
  • Friday, May 11th @ 7:30pm in Straub 156: Dr. Carolyn Finney, the author of Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors, will deliver the final keynote.

The symposium also includes panels on Practioner Perspectives on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion on Public Lands, Historical perspectives on Race, Environmental Justice, and Public Lands, Decolonizing Public Lands, and Labor as Public Lands Environmental Justice Issue. › Continue reading

Tags: ,

Saturday, January 6th, 2018 Conference, Events, Native American, Public Policy No Comments

Writing Migration Conference

May 3, 2018toMay 4, 2018

 

Knight Library
Browsing Room
1501 Kincaid St.
UO campus

Writing Migration Conference

For up-to-date information about the Writing Migration Conference May 3 – 4, 2018, go to: gerscan.uoregon.edu

In light of the global importance of contemporary migrations of populations, from Latin America to the US and Canada, from North Africa and the Middle East to Europe, and in many other directions, the German Studies Committee of the University of Oregon, has organized a conference titled ‘Writing Migration’. The conference is an interdisciplinary gathering of talks on contemporary migrations (and some historical backgrounds and precedents) in a global context, on the writing of migration, and on the migrations of writing, along crucial South-North, East-West regional trajectories and transitions. Border-contexts considered include: Mexico-US; Africa-Europe; Middle East-Europe.  Contemporary and modern philosophical perspectives invoked include transborder studies, postcolonial studies, deconstruction, media studies, and ordinary language philosophy. All presentations are free and open to the public.

The Writing Migration Conference will take place on May 3rd and 4th, 2018. Sessions will be held in the Knight Library Browsing room. In addition, there is a special talk by Father Alejandro Solalinde planned for 5:30 in PLC 180. The conference is free and open to the public.

   

Tentative Schedule

May 3rd Knight Library Browsing Room

11:00-11:15 Introduction

11:15-1:00 Session One: Migrations in Reality, Thought, and Text

  • Lynn Stephen (Anthropology, UO), “Attacking Family Unity and Racial and Economic Diversity: Ending TPS Status for Central Americans and Haitians and Beyond”
  • Thomas Nail (Philosophy, University of Denver), “The Figure of the Migrant” 
  • Mushira Habib (Comparative Literature, UO), “Migration in Claudia Rankine’s American Lyric”

1:00-3:00 Lunch Break

3:00-5:00 Session Two: Hybridity of Culture in the Colonial Borderlands

  • Pedro Garcia-Caro (Latin American Studies, UO), “From the Stacks to the Stage: Recovering Transborder Latinx Cultural History (1789-2018)”
  • Gordon Sayre (English, UO), “The Villasur Massacre of 1720: Nuevo Mexico and la Louisiane collide on the Great Plains”
  • Olga Sanchez-Saltveit (Theater Arts, UO), “Tricks to Inherit: Re-Centering a Transnational Translation on Stage”

5:00-5:15 Coffee Break

May 3rd PLC 180

5:30-7:00 Annual Bartolome de las Casas Lecture on Human Rights: Father Alejandro Solalinde**, “The Migrant’s Path/El Camino del Migrante”

**Co-sponsored by the Division of Equity and Inclusion, the Latin American Studies Program, and the Center for Latin American and Latino/a Studies

May 4th Knight Library Browsing Room

9:00-10:30 Session One: Bertolt Brecht’s Mother Courage: Migration’s Alienations

  • Dorothee Ostmeier (German and Scandinavian, UO)
  • Michael Najjar (Theater Arts, UO)
  • With actors: Penta Swanson (Mother Courage), Chris Arreola (The Cook), Dashaun Valentino-Vegas (The Chaplain), and Madeline Williams (Kattrin).

10:30-11:00 Coffee Break

11:00-12:30 Session Two: Contemporary Representations of Migration in Northern Europe

  • Sonja Boos (German and Scandinavian, UO), “‘My Escape /  Meine Flucht:’ Techfugees, Smartphones, and the Construction of a Personal Documentary.”
  • Benjamin Mier-Cruz (German and Scandinavian, UO), Brown-Eyed Boy: Being Swedish and Straight Enough in Berlin in Jonas Hassen Khemiri’s Everything I Don’t Remember“

12:30-2:30 Lunch Break

2:30-4:15 Session Three: Migrations of Image and Figure

  • David Martyn (German, Macalester College), “Grammatical Metaphor? Writing as Migration”
  • Jeff Sacks (Comparative Literature, UC Riverside), “Language Demands: Motion and Pain in Wittgenstein and La’abi”

4:15-5:00 Closing Discussion

This event is organized by the Department of German & Scandinavian, and co-sponsored by:

  • the Department of Romance Languages
  • the Department of Philosophy
  • the Department of Comparative Literature
  • the Department of Latin American Studies
  • CLLAS: Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies
  • the Global Studies Institute
  • the UO College of Arts & Sciences
  • the Oregon Humanities Center

Tags: ,

Monday, January 1st, 2018 Conference, Events, Human Rights No Comments

Symposium will focus on migration across the Americas

See story about the CLLAS Symposium in Around the O: https://around.uoregon.edu/content/symposium-will-focus-migration-across-americas?utm_source=ato03-06-18

Monday, January 1st, 2018 Conference No Comments

LALISA call for papers : deadline extended to 2/10/17

CALL FOR PAPERS: 2nd LALISA CONFERENCE April 13-15 2017

PDF LALISA CONFERENCE call for papers 

Peripheral Mappings: Social and Cultural Geographies from the Underside of Modernity

From Catalonia to California, Cuba, Chile, to all the many areas impacted by the long Iberian expansion that started in the 15th century, the foundational divisions of center and periphery have constituted cultural and social spaces where languages, bodies, ethnicities, and alternate mappings have resisted colonial hegemonic practices and institutions. According to Mexican philosopher Leopoldo Zea (1912-2004) the peripheral mappings within which Spain and Portugal were placed in the early modern period positioned their colonial territories at “the periphery of a periphery.” Decolonial movements and theoretical discussions have critically revisited the concept of periphery and problematized the discussion with new terms such as Gloria Anzaldúa’s “nepantilism” (“being between crossroads”) and her post-binary discussion of mestizo/a identities. Following on the fruitful discussions of our inaugural conference at Reed College in the spring of 2016, our Second Conference of LALISA at the University of Oregon aims to investigate the validity and contemporary currency of the center-periphery model as a way to understand Latin American, Latino/a, and Iberian cultural productions and social formations. We expect to receive papers from various disciplines across the humanities and the social sciences that will deal with issues related to the central themes of the conference:

Center/periphery; Peripheral knowledges and identities; Colonial and postcolonial cartographies; Spatial identifications; Walls, borders, and the end of globalization; Eurocentrism, white supremacist geographies of exclusion; Environmental humanities; Global/local; Postcoloniality in the post-Hispanic world; Gender formations in the peripheries of modernity; Virtual borders, zones of influence, divisions; Regionalism and nationalism, postnationalism, and neonationalism; Space and the modern/premodern/postmodern debate; Latinidad/hispanidad/indigenismo; Enrique Dussel’s concepts “underside of modernity, Transmodernity”; Marginalization and economic oppression; Racial peripheries, racialized bodies and places; Transatlantic crossings, hemispheric displacements, migrations, diasporas.

Abstracts should include a full title, a 300-word description of the paper, and the institutional affiliation of the presenter. Papers will be accepted in Spanish, Portuguese, and English. Please direct your enquiries and abstract submissions to lalisa@uoregon.edu

Deadline for receipt of abstracts has been extended to February 10th › Continue reading

Friday, January 20th, 2017 Conference No Comments

LALISA Conference “Peripheral Mappings: Social and Cultural Geographies from the Underside of Modernity”

April 13, 2017
April 14, 2017
April 15, 2017

2017 Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Studies Association (LALISA) Conference

Save-the-date for this conference, which is being cosponsored by the Latin American Studies Program and the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies.

LALISA Conference: April 13-15

Peripheral Mappings: Social and Cultural Geographies from the Underside of Modernity

From Catalonia to California, Cuba, Chile, to all the many areas impacted by the long Iberian expansion that started in the 15th century, the foundational divisions of center and periphery have constituted cultural and social spaces where languages, bodies, ethnicities, and alternate mappings have resisted colonial hegemonic practices and institutions. According to Mexican philosopher Leopoldo Zea (1912-2004) the peripheral mappings within which Spain and Portugal were placed in the early modern period positioned their colonial territories at “the periphery of a periphery.” Decolonial movements and theoretical discussions have critically revisited the concept of periphery and problematized the discussion with new terms such as Gloria Anzaldúa’s “nepantilism” (“being between crossroads”) and her post-binary discussion of mestizo/a identities. Following on the fruitful discussions of our inaugural conference at Reed College in the spring of 2016, our Second Conference of LALISA at the University of Oregon aims to investigate the validity and contemporary currency of the center-periphery model as a way to understand Latin American, Latino/a, and Iberian cultural productions and social formations. We expect to receive papers from various disciplines across the humanities and the social sciences that will deal with issues related to the central themes of the conference.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers: › Continue reading

Tags: , , ,

Sunday, January 1st, 2017 Conference, Events No Comments

“Wisdom in Water: Protecting a Universal Right” 23rd Annual CAER Conference

April 8, 2017
10:00 amto7:00 pm
2017 Coalition Against Environmental Racism 23rd Annual CAER Conference

“Wisdom in Water: Protecting a Universal Right”

CAER is a University of Oregon student organization committed to bridging the gaps of social and environmental equality. Environmental Racism addresses the fact that underprivileged people, specifically communities of color, are disproportionately impacted by pollution, waste disposal, hazardous sites, resource depletion, and natural disasters in the natural and built environment. CAER exists as a resistance to this inequality, and as a strong and visible piece of the Environmental Justice Movement — a movement composed of the mobilization of people, communities, and organizations committed to fighting Environmental Racism in urban and rural settings across the country and the world.

The theme for our conference this year is centered around water due to the recent struggles the state of Oregon and the nation face in regards to clean water and access. › Continue reading

Sunday, January 1st, 2017 Conference, Events, Human Rights, Public Policy No Comments



Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

Search

 

Upcoming Events

  • No events.

2017 Latino Roots Celebration

Categories