Violence against Women

Erin Beck: The Uneven Impacts of Violence against Women Reforms in Guatemala

May 10, 2019
12:00 pmto1:00 pm

PLC 348

Join the International Studies Community for a discussion at the INTL Lunch Talk Next Friday, May 10 @ 12 p.m. in PLC 348

The Uneven Impacts of Violence against Women Reforms in Guatemala: Intersecting Inequalities and the Patchwork State
Presented by Dr. Erin Beck, Associate Professor, Political Science, UO

In 2008, Guatemala passed one of the most comprehensive pieces of violence against women legislation in Latin America, which criminalized various forms of violence against women (VAW) and mandated the creation of a specialized court system that would focus exclusively on VAW.

This talk explores the passage of such agenda-setting reforms and analyzes their impacts. It demonstrates that the reforms’ impacts are unevenly felt, with those who are already the most marginalized benefiting the least. It explains these uneven effects by drawing on a historical intersectional analysis of gender violence and an an analysis of state-society relations at their local instantiations where reforms do (or do not) affect state officials’ behavior and individuals’ expectations and experiences of the “reformed” state.

Among other theoretical insights, this analysis reveals the importance of including place in an intersectional analysis alongside more commonly studied categories of difference such as gender, ethnicity, and class. 

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Barbara Sutton “Surviving State Terror: Women’s Testimonies of Repression and Resistance in Argentina”

October 25, 2018
12:30 pmto2:00 pm

Gerlinger Alumni Lounge
1468 University Street
UO campus
Free & open to the public

Surviving State Terror: Women’s Testimonies of Repression and Resistance in Argentina

Barbara Sutton, Associate Professor, Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
University at Albany, State University of New York

Barbara Sutton completed her PhD in sociology at the University of Oregon in 2004. This presentation is based on Sutton’s recently published book, Surviving State Terror. Based on oral testimonies of women who survived clandestine detention centers during a period of state terrorism in Argentina (1976–83), this book illuminates the gendered and embodied forms of trauma that women endured while also highlighting their historical and political agency.

Barbara Sutton / photo by Juana Ghersa

Through the lens of the body as a cross-cutting theme, the book examines gendered dimensions of experience during captivity and beyond. Sexual violence as a weapon of state terror is addressed, yet the book also shows more subtle dynamics of gender inscription through torture. Similarly, though the study attends to motherhood ideologies and the egregious treatment of pregnant women in captivity, it also explores women’s experiences beyond maternity. Public and scholarly discourse has tended to pay attention to the relatives of the people disappeared, particularly mothers; this book makes a needed contribution by bringing to the fore the stories of women who themselves were forcibly disappeared, but ultimately survived. › Continue reading

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Friday, June 22nd, 2018 Books, Events, Research No Comments

CLLAS Grantee Presentation, Rene Kladzyk

April 6, 2011
3:30 pmto5:30 pm

361 PLC (Prince Lucien Campbell Hall)
University of Oregon campus

Mobility in the El Paso/Juárez Metroplex: Navigating Fronteriza Identity in Necropolis

This research seeks to uncover linkages between globalization and violence through an analysis of mobility and economic activity among female laborers in Juarez and recent migrants to El Paso, whose displacement is often linked to danger in Juarez. Drawing from anthropology, political theory, and feminist geographic scholarship, this project will analyze the complex patterns and pathways of mobility in the Paso del Norte region. This research will amplify the voices of Latina women living in a locality as it reels from transnational forces, and will contribute to a critical discourse on gender and borderland identity.

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Thursday, November 4th, 2010 Events, Research No Comments



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2019 Judge Yassmin Barrios Lecture / photos by Jack Liu

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