UO

“Decolonial Environmentalisms: Race, Genre, and Latinx Culture,” Latinx Studies Seed Grant

February 20, 2020
3:30 pm

EMU 119

Speaker: David J. Vázquez, UO Associate Professor and Head of Department of English

David J. Vázquez

The environmental humanities explore relationships between literature, culture, and the environment with the goal of creating an earth-centered scholarly vision. Although this body of scholarship centers environmental concerns, some forms of U.S. environmentalism put ideologies of American exceptionalism to work for the movement’s political goals of, as Rob Nixon puts it, “wilderness preservation, on wielding the Endangered Species Act against developers, and on saving old-growth forests.” Although the social justice turn of the environmental humanities has integrated Environmental Justice (or EJ, the study of the uneven distribution of environmental harms and benefits to people of color and the poor) approaches, some pockets of environmental thought continue to emphasize first-world, privileged perspectives over those of people of color, indigenous people, the economically disempowered, the colonized, and the formerly colonized.

“Decolonial Environmentalisms: Race, Genre and Latinx Culture,” intervenes in these trends by identifying parallel and countervailing environmental representations in contemporary Latinx literature and culture that intertwine decolonial and anti-racist forms of thought with environmental imaginaries. Building on the work of environmental humanities scholars who point to privileged perspectives in environmental thought, this project identifies Latinx literary and cultural texts that express neglected environmental perspectives, often through innovative aesthetic forms. These literary texts and cultural productions question stylized pastoral visions of agriculture and speak powerfully to EJ frameworks. The presentation will conclude with a close reading of Alex Rivera’s 2009 film Sleep Dealer as a case study for how decolonial environmentalisms operate in Latinx culture.

David J. Vázquez is Associate Professor and Head of English and a contributing faculty member in the Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies Department and the Program in Environmental Studies at the University of Oregon. He is the author of Triangulations: Narrative Strategies for Navigating Latino Identity (Minnesota 2011) and co-editor of Latinx Environmentalisms: Place, Justice, and the Decolonial (forthcoming Temple). His articles appear in such journals as Arizona QuarterlySymbolismContemporary Literature, CENTRO and Latino Studies. He has also contributed to the Routledge Companion to Latino/a Literature and Erasing Public Memory: Race, Aesthetics, and Cultural Amnesia in the Americas.

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Thursday, February 20th, 2020 Funding, Research No Comments

CLLAS Distinguished Lecture in Latinx & Latin American Studies: Filmmaker Alex Rivera

April 14, 2020
6:00 pm

Lecture:  “The Border as a Way of Seeing” 
6pm, April 14, 2020 
Straub Hall 156 
University of Oregon 

Film Screening: The Infiltrators 
6pm, April 16, 2020 
Bijou Art Cinemas
492 E 13th Avenue 

Alex Rivera is a filmmaker who’s been telling ground-breaking Latino stories for more than twenty years. His first feature film, a cyberpunk thriller set in Tijuana, Mexico, Sleep Dealer, won multiple awards at Sundance and was screened around the world. Rivera’s second feature film, a documentary/scripted hybrid set in an immigrant detention center, The Infiltrators, won both the Audience Award and the Innovator Award at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival and is being released theatrically in the U.S. in 2020. Rivera’s work has been supported by the Ford Foundation, the Tribeca Film Institute, the Open Society Institute, and many others.

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Saturday, February 15th, 2020 Art, Music & Culture, Film No Comments

Film Screening of “The Infiltrators”

April 16, 2020
6:00 pm

Film Screening: The Infiltrators 
6pm, April 16, 2020 
Bijou Art Cinemas
492 E 13th Avenue 

Alex Rivera is a filmmaker who’s been telling ground-breaking Latino stories for more than twenty years. His first feature film, a cyberpunk thriller set in Tijuana, Mexico, Sleep Dealer, won multiple awards at Sundance and was screened around the world. Rivera’s second feature film, a documentary/scripted hybrid set in an immigrant detention center, The Infiltrators, won both the Audience Award and the Innovator Award at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival and is being released theatrically in the U.S. in 2020. Rivera’s work has been supported by the Ford Foundation, the Tribeca Film Institute, the Open Society Institute, and many others.

The Infiltrators is a docu-thriller that tells the true story of young immigrants who get arrested by Border Patrol, and put in a shadowy for-profit detention center – on purpose. Marco and Viri are members of the National Immigrant Youth Alliance, a group of radical Dreamers who are on a mission to stop deportations. And the best place to stop deportations, they believe, is in detention. However, when Marco and Viri try to pull off their heist – a kind of ‘prison break’ in reverse – things don’t go according to
plan.

By weaving together documentary footage of the real infiltrators with scripted reenactments of the events inside the detention center, The Infiltrators tells this incredible true story in a boundary-crossing new cinematic language. The Hollywood Reporter said of the multiple award-winning film “rather than feeling like homework, watching it is a thrill.”

CLLAS Distinguished Lecture in Latinx & Latin American Studies, Filmmaker Alex Rivera:  “The Border as a Way of Seeing” 
6pm, April 14, 2020 
Straub Hall 156 
University of Oregon 

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Friday, February 14th, 2020 Film No Comments

Bilingualism: Myths Abound!

February 13, 2020
6:00 pm

Gumwood Room, EMU 245

Bilingualism (and multilingualism) are prevalent across the United States, yet myths about its development, value, and role in educational spaces continue to spread. Join faculty researchers from the College of Education and the Department of Linguistics as we share our research related to bilingualism at all stages of the lifespan, and dispel some of the common misconceptions you may have heard.

Moderated by Lillian Durán, Associate Professor of Special Education

View Powerpoints of the following presentations:

This event is co-sponsored by CLLAS and the College of Education.

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CLLAS Grad Colloquium, “Gender and Climate Crisis in the Americas”

April 21, 2020
12:00 pm

12 pm, Knight Library Browsing Room

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Wednesday, January 15th, 2020 Graduate students, Research No Comments

CLLAS Grad Colloquium, “Politics and Justice in the Caribbean and Central America”

May 26, 2020
12:00 pm

12 pm, Knight Library Browsing Room

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Tuesday, January 14th, 2020 Graduate students, Research No Comments



Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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CLLAS Common Reading Brunch with author Helena María Viramontes / Photos by Mike Bragg / Courtesy of the UO Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

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