CLLAS

Fair Trade Rebels: UO graduate Lindsay Naylor has a new book on coffee production in Chiapas

Fair Trade Rebels: Coffee Production and Struggles for Autonomy in Chiapas, by Lindsay Naylor. Diverse Economies and Livable Worlds Series. (University of Minnesota Press, 2019)

Lindsay Naylor is an assistant professor, Department of Geography & Spatial Sciences, College of Earth, Ocean, & Environment at the University of Delaware. As a graduate student at the University of Oregon, she was the recipient of a 2010 CLLAS Graduate Student Research Grant for “Harnessing Multiple Movements: The Intersection of Fair Trade and the Zapatista Movement in Chiapas, Mexico.”

Naylor’s new book is titled Fair Trade Rebels: Coffee Production and Struggles for Autonomy in Chiapas.

Synopsis: Is fair trade really fair? Who is it for, and who gets to decide? Fair Trade Rebels addresses such questions in a new way by shifting the focus from the abstract concept of fair trade–and whether it is “working”–to the perspectives of small farmers. It examines the everyday experiences of resistance and agricultural practice among the campesinos/as of Chiapas, Mexico, who struggle for dignified livelihoods in self-declared autonomous communities in the highlands, confronting inequalities locally in what is really a global corporate agricultural chain.

Based on extensive fieldwork, Fair Trade Rebels draws on stories from Chiapas that have emerged from the farmers’ interaction with both the fair-trade-certified marketplace and state violence. Here Lindsay Naylor discusses the racialized and historical backdrop of coffee production and rebel autonomy in the highlands, underscores the divergence of movements for fairer trade and the so-called alternative certified market, traces the network of such movements from the highlands and into the United States, and evaluates existing food sovereignty and diverse economic exchanges. Putting decolonial thinking in conversation with diverse economies theory, Fair Trade Rebels evaluates fair trade not by the measure of its success or failure but through a unique, place-based approach that expands our understanding of the relationship between fair trade, autonomy, and economic development.

Tags: , ,

Spring 2019 CLLAS Notes

0519-CLLAS-newsletter_FINAL

The 2019 spring edition of CLLAS Notes, our twice-yearly newsletter, is now available online and in print.

History professor Carlos Aguirre reviews his tenure as CLLAS interim director and takes us on a look ahead at the new two-year plan for CLLAS, a series of initiatives and events under the theme “The Politics of Language in the Americas.”

Learn about Judge Yassmin Barrios’s visit to the UO campus in March and her lecture on “Justice and Reparation in Guatemala,” where she talked about her experience with the High Risk Crime Tribunal over which she presides. Check out the accounts of graduate student research in Peru and Guatemala and faculty research in Bolivia. Read about CLLAS founding director Lynn Stephen’s experience as the president of the Latin American Studies Association.

CLLAS event planner & project manager Feather Crawford fills us in on the January CLLAS Town Hall with Mae Ngai, the 2018-19 Wayne Morse Center Chair. And thanks to Crawford’s excellent reporting, you can find out more about why migrants are fleeing Honduras when you read her account of historian Dana Frank’s detailed talk held in April.

The 2019 Spring edition of CLLAS Notes, Volume 10, Issue 2 includes:

  • Letter from Interim Director Carlos Aguirre
  • “Justice and Reparation in Guatemala”—Judge Yassmin Barrios’s lecture about justice & human rights in Guatemala
  • “Lynn Stephen Completes Her Tenure as LASA President”
  • Faculty Research—“Strugging with Sustainability: Guarayo Cultural and Environmental Management Challenges”
  • Graduate Research—“Responses to Gendered Violence in Costa Rica and Guatemala”
  • Graduate Research—“Sounds of Power: Peruvian colonial pipe organs in the interplay of cultures”
  • Graduate Research—“Environmental Justice and the Local Effects of Glacier Melt in the Peruvian Cordillera Huayhuash”
  • News & Book Notes
  • Event Reports
  • 2019-20 Grant Recipients

Tags: , ,

“Visual Clave” CLLAS Research Series: Faculty Collaboration Research Grant

April 11, 2019
3:30 pmto5:00 pm

Ford Lecture Hall
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)
1430 Johnson Lane
University of Oregon campus

CLLAS Research Series: Faculty Collaboration Research Grant

The Expression of the Latino/a Experience Through Album Cover Art: 1940-1990, a Conversation between Philip W. Scher and Pablo E. Yglesias, Co-curators of the Exhibition” 

This CLLAS Research Series presentation will discuss the cultural and political dimensions of Latinx presence in the US seen through Latin album cover art. 

Visual Clave is connected to the exhibit with the same title and has been organized by Philip W. Scher, UO Professor of Anthropology and Folklore and Public Culture and Divisional Dean for Social Sciences, and Pablo E. Yglesias, a Northampton, MA-based Cuban-American researcher, writer, musician, artist, and DJ. The exhibit could be seen at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art through April 21, 2019 and is supported by AUO’s College of Arts and Sciences, CLLAS, and a JSMA Academic Support Grant.

Visual Clave is organized by Philip W. Scher, UO Professor of Anthropology and Folklore and Public Culture and Divisional Dean for Social Sciences, and Pablo E. Yglesias, a Northampton, MA-based Cuban-American researcher, writer, musician, artist, and DJ. An expanded version of the exhibition was on view previously at the Student Union Art Gallery at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst; the Bronx Music Heritage Center, NY; and Picture Farm Gallery, Brooklyn, NY. Visual Clave takes its inspiration and intellectual structure from Yglesias’ book Cocinando: 50 Years of Latin Album Cover Art (Princeton Architectural Press, 2005). 

All album covers reproduced courtesy of their respective record labels.

The talk is at 3:30 p.m. on April 11 in the Ford Lecture Hall at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art. Live music by Malanga starting at 4:30. Light refreshments to be served. 1430 Johnson Lane, University of Oregon campus. jsma.uoregon.edu 541.346.3027

Tags: , , ,

Why are the Migrants Fleeing Honduras?

April 10, 2019
4:00 pmto5:30 pm

Knight Library, Browsing Room, 1501 Kincaid St., UO campus

“Why are the Migrants Fleeing Honduras? Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup”

Speaker: Dana Frank
Professor of History Emerita
University of California, Santa Cruz

In this presentation Dana Frank will discuss her new book, The Long Honduran Night: Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup, which examines Honduras since the 2009 coup that deposed democratically-elected President Manuel Zelaya. In the book, she interweaves her personal experiences in post-coup Honduras and in the US Congress with a larger analysis of the coup regime and its ongoing repression, Honduran opposition movements, US policy in support of the regime, and Congressional challenges to that policy. Her book helps us understand the root causes of the immigrant caravans of Hondurans leaving for the US, and the destructive impact of US policy.

Dana Frank is Professor of History Emerita  at the University of California, Santa Cruz.  Herbooks include Bananeras: Women Transforming the Banana Unions of Latin America, which focuses on Honduras, and Buy American: The Untold Story of Economic Nationalism.  Her writings on human rights and U.S. policy in post-coup Honduras have appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Miami Herald, Houston Chronicle, The Nation, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Politico Magazine, and many other publications, and she has been interviewed by the Washington Post, New Yorker, New York Times, National Public Radio, Univsion, Latino USAregularly on Democracy Now!and on other outlets.  Professor Frank  has testified about Honduras before the US House of Representatives, the California Assembly, and the Canadian Parliament.

Tags: , , , ,

Friday, January 4th, 2019 Books, Events, News No Comments

Ernesto Martínez, “The Femeniños Project: Literature and Visual Media for Queer Latino/x Youth”

March 7, 2019
3:30 pmto5:00 pm

Diamond Lake Room, Erb Memorial Union (EMU 119)

CLLAS Research Series Presentation

“The Femeniños Project: Literature and Visual Media for Queer Latino/x Youth.” 

Ernesto Javier Martínez, associate professor, Department of Ethnic Studies, will present his recent work with the Femeniños Project, a multi-genre storytelling initiative that brings together award-winning filmmakers, writers, illustrators, and musicians to help mitigate the severe underrepresentation of Latino/x youth in contemporary cultural production and to proactively challenge the harm inflicted upon queer youth of color when their humanity is distorted in the mainstream imagination. 

Ernesto Martinez

CLLAS awarded its first Latinx Studies seed grant (2018-19) for research or creative projects to Professor Martinez, for his proposal, “A Child Should Not Long for Its Own Image: Literature and Visual Media for Queer Latinx Youth.” The project included four components: (1) the production of the short film La Serenata; (2) the premier screening of the film at the University of Oregon, followed by a discussion with the director and fellow collaborators; (3) a community conversation about queer Latinx youth with teachers and parents in the Eugene/Springfield area; and (4) free distribution of the bilingual children’s book When We Love Someone, We Sing to Them to local schools, libraries, and community centers.

La Serenata is a film adaption of a children’s book that Martínez wrote, entitled When We Love Someone, We Sing to Them, published in 2018 by Reflections Press. “Both the screenplay and the book,” Martínez said, “tell the story of a Mexican-American boy who learns from his parents about serenatas and why demonstrating romantic affection proudly, publicly, and through song is such a treasured Mexican tradition. One day, the boy asks his parents if there is a song for a boy who loves a boy. The parents, surprised by the question and unsure of how to answer, must decide how to honor their son and how to reimagine a beloved tradition.”

Tags: , , , ,

Rejuvenating Nahuatl Scholarship in the 21st Century

February 27, 2019
4:00 pmto6:00 pm

A Presentation by Dra. Lidi a E. Gómez García
Wednesday, February 27, 4-6 pm, 375 McKenzie Hall

Ethnohistorian Lidia  E. Gómez García (Benemérita Universidad de Puebla, Mexico), will  speak  about colonial manuscript production (alphabetic and pictorial) by Nahuas, the ethnic group that included the Aztecs,  during roughly three centuries, from 1540 to 1830. She will discuss how Nahua scholars have become engaged in the serious study of these fascinating indigenous-language manuscripts, thousands of which survive to this day.  

Sponsored by the Departments of History and Romance Languages, Latin American Studies, and the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies.

 

Tags: , , ,




Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

Search

 

Categories