Events

Air, Water, Land: Fall 2021 Symposium

November 4, 2021
9:00 amto5:00 pm

Air, Water, Land 

Native/Indigenous, Black, and Afro-Descendent Relationalities and Activism 

November 4, 2021

This symposium will feature three remote panels that explore connections and intersections in activism through air, land, and water, a keynote conversation, and a final discussion and demonstration of sustainable food systems. This event is organized by the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS), Native American and Indigenous Studies, Anthropology, Black Studies, the Global Justice Initiative, and the Common Reading program of the University of Oregon.

Climate change, environmental racism, settler colonialism, white supremacy, patriarchy, north/south divides, and unequal access to basic environmental resources by communities of color have inspired ongoing environmental justice activism in the Americas.

This symposium will center Indigenous and Black voices, leverage the campus residencies of Maya activist and teacher Irma Alicia Velasquez Nimatuj (in residence through the Global Justice Initiative and the Department of Anthropology) and Muskogee/Creek artist and activist Amber Starks (in residence through the UO Common Reading program) and focus on environmental justice and sustainable food systems. Designed to foster critical conversations from Indigenous and Black/Afro-descendant communities across the Americas, this event is organized around themes of air, land, and water, with a committed focus to issues impacting local communities. 

Coast Fork, Willamette River, Kalapuya ilihi

The University of Oregon is located on Kalapuya ilihi, the traditional indigenous homeland of the Kalapuya people.

Following treaties between 1851 and 1855, Kalapuya people were dispossessed of their indigenous homeland by the United States government and forcibly removed to the Coast Reservation in Western Oregon.

Today, Kalapuya descendants are primarily citizens of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, and they continue to make important contributions to their communities, to the UO, to Oregon, and to the world.

Symposium Description in Spanish

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Friday, October 1st, 2021 Events, Symposium No Comments

Turning Latinas/os/x Into a Month: Mediatizing a Heterogeneous Culture

October 20, 2021
4:15 pmto5:30 pm

Video

Each September, corporations, educational institutions, and media outlets, invest heavily in the celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month. While the effort is meant to acknowledge the unique contributions of Latinxs, it has, for some organizations, become a way to publicly assert their commitment to diversity without promoting any substantive change. In this panel discussion, three Latinx scholars discuss the role of Hispanic Heritage Month in contemporary society. As part of that discussion, panelists will explore the impact of such celebrations on the actual lived experiences of Latinxs, including which facets of Latinx life are considered worthy of public celebration, and which are obscured and left unaddressed.

Aztlan Topializti Mural, Erb Memorial Union

Watch this remote collaborative panel between CLLAS and the Department of Latina/o Studies at the University of Illinois! Find the video here.

Dr. Angharad Valdivia (Chair of the Department of Latina/Latino Studies at the University of Illinois) will lead a conversation with Dr. Audrey Lucero (Associate Professor, Department of Education Studies, Director, Critical & Sociocultural Studies program, Director, Latinx Studies Program), Ariana Cano (Doctoral Student in the Institute of Communication Research in the College of Media at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign), and Chris Chávez (Director, CLLAS, Media Studies, Advertising, and Latinx Studies, School of Journalism and Communication, UO).

This was a remote event. Zoom login information is sent out via CLLAS emails. Please subscribe, or email cllas@uoregon.edu today!

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CLLAS Undergraduate Award Ceremony

June 2, 2021
12:00 pmto1:00 pm

EVENT

Please join us for the 2021 CLLAS Undergraduate Award Ceremony! We will be celebrating the work of the talented and hard-working students who have been awarded the CLLAS Undergraduate Award.

The CLLAS Undergraduate Award recognizes outstanding academic work on Latinx and Latin American topics and/or issues. Please find the award description here.

This is a remote event and will take place over Zoom.To join the CLLAS email list and receive Zoom login information, please email us at cllas@uoregon.edu or subscribe here.

CLLAS Undergraduate Award Recipients

Emily Chavez Romero – Latino Roots Film: Dreams that Cross Borders

Thomas Parker – Research Paper: Wild Tales

Caitlin Scott – Honor’s Thesis: Reinforcing Push Factors in the Northern Triangle: An Investigation of Trump’s Attempts to Deter Immigration through Humanitarian Aid Reduction

Eva Shannon – Art Cover: La cena miserable, Eduardo Kingman, Ecuador

CLLAS Undergraduate Award Honorable Mentions

Taylor Henry – Art Cover: Manos de la protesta, Oswaldo Guayamin, Ecuador

Adrianna Vaca-Navarro – Honor’s Thesis: Chapter on immigration and border imperialism

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Sunday, April 25th, 2021 Events, Undergraduates No Comments

Shadow Suburbanism: Mexican Settlement and Immigration Enforcement in the Nuevo South

CLLAS Faculty Event

VIDEO

View the video for this CLLAS Research Series Faculty presentation by John Arroyo (School of Planning, Public Policy, and Management), here.

Over the past 20 years, Mexican communities have bypassed historic, urban ethnic enclaves to settle in and physically transform suburban areas of U.S. South. Nowhere is this spatial “Latinization” phenomenon more acute than in small towns such as those in Gwinnett County (metropolitan Atlanta), one of the foremost frontiers of new immigrant destinations in America. Coinciding with the growth of predominantly undocumented Mexican immigrants in these regions have been popular state and county-level immigration policies —all of which have use explicit language to position states like Georgia to be a national pioneer of hyper immigration surveillance and a regional enforcement model for neighboring metropolitan areas. The culmination of these adverse effects has required Mexican residents to create covert, built environments. Findings from this research analyze the key reactionary anti-immigrant federalism policies that influence how Mexican immigrants reshape culturally-specific land use in suburban Atlanta. 

John Arroyo, PhD, AICP is an Assistant Professor in Engaging Diverse Communities and director of the Pacific Northwest Just Futures Institute for Racial and Climate Justice at the University of Oregon. Previously, he was an The Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Latino Studies at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe, NM. As a scholar and practitioner of urban planning and migration studies, Arroyo’s applied research and teaching agendas focus on inclusive urbanism. He is particularly interested in the social, political, and cultural dimensions of immigrant-centered built environments and neighborhood change in underrepresented communities. He received a doctorate in Urban Planning, Policy, and Design as well as a Master’s in City Planning and a Certificate in Urban Design from MIT. He is a governor-appointed member of the Oregon State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation and serves on the boards of the Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities and the Public Humanities Network.

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Monday, April 12th, 2021 Events, Public Policy, Uncategorized No Comments

Researching Experiences of Uncertainty and Collective Care

May 12, 2021
12:00 pmto1:00 pm

Event

Please join us for the Spring 2021 CLLAS Research Series Graduate Student Colloquium!

This is a remote event and will take place over Zoom. To join the CLLAS email list and receive Zoom login information, please email us at cllas@uoregon.edu or subscribe here.

Photo by Polet Campos-Melchor

Polet Campos-Melchor (Anthropology), “El Noa Noa: Strategies of Love and Care at the U.S.- México border”

In this talk, I textualize my ethnographic research conducted in Ciudad Juárez during the summer of 2019 and the 10 follow up virtual interviews I conducted in 2020. The questions that informed my research are: How do trans asylum seekers re-conceptualize love as a survival strategy in the context of migration? What strategies do trans asylum seekers utilize while navigating the U.S.-México border? How do trans asylum seekers narrate their experiences of love in the face of trans bigotry and at the intersections of trans phobia, homophobia and xenophobia?  By focusing on trans asylum seekers’ experiences, I propose that trans asylum seekers’ strategies of love at the U.S.- México border challenge existing heteronormative migration narratives and stories of LGBT+ subjectivities.

Photo by Lola Loustaunau

Lola Loustaunau (Sociology), “From disposability to collective care: experiences of migrant essential workers during the COVID-19 pandemic”

For migrant workers in food processing “becoming essential” during the past year meant the exacerbation of their disposability. This research explores these workers’ experiences as the pandemic unfolded, how they struggled for their and their families’ survival, and as they did so, built new and expansive communities of care. I argue that unpacking the affective dimension of their working conditions and their collective organizing allows seeing how these workers turned coraje into courage and defied the structural oppression that had rendered them disposable.

Polet Campos-Melchor and Lola Loustaunau were both awarded the 2020 CLLAS Summer Research Grant.

Polet Campos-Melchor is a PhD student in Anthropology and Graduate Certificate student in WGSS at the University of Oregon. Her research explores how trans and lesbian migrants and scholars articulate and narrate strategies of love and care, expanding beyond only the imaginary into tangible strategies of survival. Polet is also a University of Oregon Promising Scholar. Her research has been funded by the Tinker Foundation, the University of Oregon’s Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies, and the Center for the Study of Women in Society.

Lola Loustaunau is a Ph.D. candidate in the Sociology Department. Her research focuses on precarity, low-wage migrant workers, emotions, and collective organizing. She has received several awards for her dissertation work and will be a Wayne Morse Graduate Fellow for the AY 2021-2022. She has recently co-authored: ‘No choice but to be essential: expanding dimensions of precarity during the COVID-19’ (Sociological perspectives, 2021) and ‘Impossible choices: how workers manage unpredictable scheduling practices’ (Labor Studies Journal 2019).

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Monday, April 12th, 2021 Events No Comments


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Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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