Call for 2020 CLLAS Graduate Grant Proposals

March 6, 2020
12:00 pm

The Center for Latino/a & Latin American Studies (CLLAS) Announces 2020 Field Research Grants in Latin America (Tinker-like grant) 

CLLAS invites graduate students to submit proposals for field research in Latin America (Spanish or Portuguese speaking countries). We expect to award at least three grants for up to $3,300 each to advance research for either master’s or pre-dissertation doctoral candidates. See criteria in the linked PDF: 2020 Call for Tinker like Proposals Final

The Center for Latino/a & Latin American Studies (CLLAS) Announces Graduate Student 2020 Summer Research Grants 

In order to encourage and support interdisciplinary graduate student research in the areas of Latinx and Latin American Studies, CLLAS announces a program for summer research support. We expect to award up to two summer grants for $1,500 each to advance research for either master’s or doctoral candidates. The award will support research-related activities carried out from July 1 through September 30, 2020.∗ We are especially interested in projects that link Latinx Studies or Latin American Studies with other disciplines. See criteria in the linked PDF: 2020 Call for Grad Proposals Final

Application Deadline: 12:00 pm (noon), Friday, March 6, 2020 Applicants will be notified by April 3, 2020.

Eugene School District 4J Superintendent Dr. Gustavo Balderas Named Nation’s Top Superintendent

CLLAS congratulates Dr. Gustavo Balderas, superintendent of the Eugene School District 4J, for being selected as the 2020 National Superintendent of the Year. Dr. Balderas was a featured speaker in October 2015 at the CLLAS-sponsored event “Latina/os and K-12 Education: Bridging Research and Practice.”

February 14, 2020—“Dr. Gustavo Balderas, superintendent of Eugene School District 4J since 2015, has been named the nation’s top superintendent.

“In his acceptance speech, Dr. Balderas identified himself as ‘a proud son of a migrant family from Piedras Negras, Coahuila, Mexico’ and ‘a proud product of our public school system.’

“‘It is truly an honor to serve in the role of superintendent of Eugene public schools. I am blessed to be in my community,’ said Dr. Balderas. ‘Seeing that kids are succeeding because of the changes we’re making drives me. We, as leaders, need to be champions for our profession. Education is the backbone to our democracy.’”

For the full story, go to the 4J website article: https://www.4j.lane.edu/2020/02/gustavo-balderas-national-superintendent-of-the-year/

Angel Dorantes among those honored at 2020 MLK Awards ceremony

Angel Dorantes

CLLAS affiliated faculty Angel Dorantes, undergraduate advising and retention coordinator in the College of Education, was one of two people to receive the Outstanding Diversity Practitioner award at the annual Martin Luther King, Jr. awards ceremony held this year on Jan. 16 in the Erb Memorial Union ballroom at UO. Celena Simpson, assistant director of Pathway Oregon in the Tutoring and Academic Engagement Center, also received this award.

From Around the O:

“The Outstanding Diversity Practitioner award recognizes and celebrates colleagues on campus whose primary responsibility is in the area of diversity, equity and inclusion, but who go above and beyond the scope of their role. They are recognized due to their relentless support, advocacy and overall impact, both on and beyond campus

“Dorantes nomination was spurred by his research, teaching and service, particularly on and for UO Latinx students, including co-authoring a peer-reviewed article used by university executives to ‘address issues, challenges and opportunities to better serve Latinx students at the UO.’

“He served as the inaugural faculty advisor for the Latinx Male Student Alliance, which has grown from 20 to 60 participants since 2017, and has held college information workshops for more than 500 Latinx high school students. In 2018, he was awarded the Professional Advisor of the Year award and was then appointed to the All-Campus Advising Association Executive Committee to enhance advising universitywide.”

To read more about the awards ceremony and others who won awards that day, go to: https://around.uoregon.edu/content/members-uo-community-honored-annual-mlk-awards

Winter 2020 CLLAS Notes

Winter 2020 CLLAS Notes

The 2020 winter edition of CLLAS Notes, our twice-yearly newsletter, is now available online. Print edition will be available after January 1.

Gabriela Martínez, CLLAS director and SOJC professor, revisits our fall events. Fall saw the kick-off of a new two-year theme, “The Politics of Language in the Americas: Power, Culture, History, and Resistance.” CLLAS organized several fall events, including partnering with the UO Common Reading program and Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art this fall to host a brunch with Helena María Viramontes, author of Under the Feet of Jesus.

Read about award-winning poet Melissa Lozada-Oliva’s visit to UO on October 9, which included a poetry slam and a teach-in where guests teamed up to compose original poems. Learn about CLLAS-funded faculty and graduate research on topics ranging from agricultural practices in Amazonian Ecuador to gender-based violence in Brazil. 

The 2020 winter edition of CLLAS Notes, Volume 11, Issue 1, includes:

  • Letter from Director, Gabriela Martínez
  • “Poet Melissa Lozada-Oliva a Big Hit with UO Students”
  • Graduate Research—“Transmission of Traditional Botanical Knowledge among the Shuar of Amazonian Ecuador”
  • Graduate Research—“Recalling Runaways: Studies of Slavery and Absenteeism in Cuba”
  • Graduate Research—“The Struggle Continues: Gender-based Violence and the Politics of Justice and Care in Urban Brazil”
  • Faculty Research—“Decolonial Environmentalisms: Race, Genre, and Latinx Literature”
  • News & Book Notes
  • Event Reports

Tracing the journeys of the Caribbean’s first people

Reprinted from Around the O
https://around.uoregon.edu/content/tracing-journeys-caribbeans-first-people

Caribbean Digging at Grand Bay

January 6, 2020—People first settled the Caribbean thousands of years ago, but their exact migration routes have long remained a puzzle. Now, a new study coauthored by eight UO researchers is piecing that puzzle together through a rigorous reexamination of archaeological data.

Published in the journal Science Advances, the study reports evidence that the first Caribbean islanders traveled directly from South America to the northern Caribbean beginning about 5,800 years ago, initially settling Cuba, Hispaniola and Puerto Rico in the Greater Antilles and smaller islands in the northern Lesser Antilles before further colonizing islands to the south.

“This scenario contradicts a competing ‘stepping stone’ model that many archaeologists still subscribe to, which asserts a south-to-north settlement beginning in the Lesser Antilles,” said Matthew Napolitano, the study’s lead author and a doctoral student in the Department of Anthropology

Critics of the stepping stone model point out that trade winds and ocean currents in the region would have made travel toward the southern Lesser Antilles difficult for expeditions from the South or Central American mainlands and that early seafarers would likely have been attracted to the larger, more productive islands of the Greater Antilles, settling those first before gradually migrating southward.

The new study is the culmination of a graduate student project supervised by Scott Fitzpatrick, associate director of the UO’s Museum of Natural and Cultural History and a professor in the Department of Anthropology. Conducted over a four-year period by Napolitano and Fitzpatrick along with graduate students Robert DiNapoli, Jessica Stone and several others, the project was designed to put the stepping stone model and other Caribbean settlement hypotheses to the test.

The north-to-south pattern was borne out in the team’s research, which involved tracking down and reevaluating nearly 2,500 radiocarbon dates reported from cultural sites on 55 Caribbean islands.

The authors assessed each date’s reliability using strict criteria related to the geologic and archaeological contexts of the dated material, the quality of the samples and the lab conditions under which the materials were analyzed. The dates were then subjected to rigorous statistical analyses, resulting in a new and exceptionally robust colonization model.  

“By carefully applying these criteria, we were able to improve confidence about the reported dates, as well as whether the dated materials actually relate to human activity,” Fitzpatrick said.

To the researchers’ surprise, just over half of the analyzed radiocarbon dates passed muster, despite more than 50 years of archaeological scholarship in the region.

“Our analysis of the resulting acceptable dates, which represent human occupations on 26 islands, provides the first reliable model for initial arrival in the region,” said Fitzpatrick, an expert in island and coastal archaeology whose research focuses on the Caribbean and Pacific.    

The study has also resulted in the largest publicly accessible database of radiocarbon dates for the region.     

“Human colonization of the Caribbean is one of the least understood population dispersals in the Americas,” Napolitano said. “This work helps solve some of the mystery while providing a ‘best practices’ approach to collecting and reporting radiocarbon dates.”  

—By Kristin Strommer, Museum of Natural and Cultural History

RELATED LINKS

Study finds climate helped guide early Pacific seafarers

Archaeologists develop a new picture of the human footprint

Department of Anthropology

Meet Scott Fitzpatrick

Meet Matthew Napolitano

Read the study

The Jewish Diaspora in Latin America Website Launch

March 11, 2020
3:00 pmto5:00 pm

Join us for undergraduate research presentations and the launching of the website “The Jewish Diaspora in Latin America.” The event showcases the work of students from the Honors College Colloquium focusing on Latin America’s Jewish diaspora, their customs and languages, led by professor Monique Balbuena.

This event is part of CLLAS’ Two-year Theme, “The Politics of Language in the Americas: Power, Culture, History, and Resistance.
Refreshments will be served!




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Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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CLLAS Common Reading Brunch with author Helena María Viramontes / Photos by Mike Bragg / Courtesy of the UO Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

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