Spring Graduate Research Colloquium I: Tension, Gender, Poetry, and Song in Latin American Literature

April 14, 2022
3:30 pmto5:00 pm

CLLAS Research Series

125 McKenzie

Marina Penalosa (Romance Languages)

“An Intellectual Field in Tension. The Other Borges”   

Marina Penalosa is a PhD candidate in the Department of Romance Languages. Her dissertation “An Intellectual Field in Tension. The Other Borges” explores how Jorge Luis Borges’ lectures shaped him as a canonical Argentine writer, through the global evolution of his role in the intellectual field. The project seeks to address Borges’ efforts to occupy a privileged position in the public sphere in the microcosm of the cultural field. I analyze the context of the cultural events from the 1920s to the late 1980s in Argentina through the lenses of literary analysis and cultural sociology. Her presentation is the result of the archival work she did in Buenos Aires. With the support of the CLLAS scholarship she worked on the archives of the National Library to find traces of the cultural events of the public lectures in the city during the 1920’s and 1930’s. 

Elizabeth Sotelo (Romance Languages)

“Beyond Gender: Inequalities and Invisibilities Among Female Literary Chroniclers in Peru and Mexico”  

Elizabeth Sotelo is a Ph.D. candidate in Spanish in the Department of Romance Languages at the University of Oregon. She obtained an M.A. degree in Hispanic Studies from the University of California Riverside and a B.A. in Spanish literature and linguistics from California State Polytechnic University Pomona. Her research interests are Latin American literature and culture from the 20th and 21st centuries (emphasis on Peru and Mexico), the chronicle genre, postcolonial studies, critical race studies, critical theory, feminist studies, and narratology. Currently, she is working on her dissertation “The Urban Literary Chronicle in Peru and Mexico (1999-2021): Inhabitants, Peripheries, Epistemic Decolonization”, which focuses on how selected chronicles render visible a decolonizing and political stand through their writing. 

Magela Baudoin (Romance Languages)

“Poetry and Popular Song in Matilde Casazola and Violeta Parra: The Journey of the Seed”   

Magela Baudoin is a Bolivian writer and journalist, author of the books “Mujeres de Costado” (Plural 2010), “El sonido de la H” (National Novel Award 2014-Bolivia), “La composición de la sal” (Gabriel García Márquez Hispano-American Short Story Prize-2015), and “Vendrá la muerte y tendrá tus ojos” (finalist for the VI Ribera del Duero-Páginas de Espuma Award in Spain-2020). Her work has been translated into English, Italian, Portuguese and Arabic. Together with Giovanna Rivero, she directs Editorial Mantis, specialized in publishing the work of Spanish-speaking women. In 2021 she received the Anna Seghers award. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in Literature and Romance Languages at the University from Oregon (USA).

 

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Friday, February 18th, 2022 Events, Graduate students, Research No Comments

Becoming Heritage: Recognition, Exclusion, and the Politics of Black Cultural Heritage in Colombia

March 3, 2022
3:30 pmto5:00 pm

CLLAS Faculty Research Presentation

180 PLC, University of Oregon

Join CLLAS for our first 2022 faculty research presentation: “Becoming Heritage: Recognition, Exclusion, and the Politics of Black Cultural Heritage in Colombia.” Maria Fernanda Escallón (Department of Anthropology) will share her work on March 3, 2022, 3:30-5pm.

This in-person event will take place in 180 PLC. Masks are required. Attendance will be capped at 100.

Photo by Maria Fernanda Escallón

Maria Fernanda Escallón is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Oregon. She was born and raised in Bogotá, Colombia, where she completed a BA and MA in Anthropology and Archaeology at the Universidad de Los Andes. In 2016 she completed her PhD in Anthropology at Stanford University. Before starting her doctorate, she worked in sustainable development and heritage policy-making for non-governmental organizations and Colombian public entities, including the Ministry of Culture and Bogotá’s Secretary of Culture and Tourism.

Maria Fernanda is interested in cultural heritage, race, diversity politics, ethnicity, and inequality in Latin America. Prior to joining the Anthropology Department at the University of Oregon, she was a 2015-2016 Dissertation Fellow in the Department of Black Studies at the University of California Santa Barbara. She has conducted field research in Colombia for over 10 years analyzing how and why certain multicultural policies that are ostensibly inclusive, can end up replicating, rather than dismantling, inequality and segregation across Latin America. Her latest book “Becoming Heritage: Recognition, Exclusion, and the Politics of Black Cultural Heritage in Colombia” is currently under contract with Cambridge University Press.

Her research has received support from a variety of sources, including the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), the Wenner Gren Foundation, the Social Sciences Research Council, the Fulbright Program, the Mellon Foundation, and the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University. Her most recent work appears in Cultural Anthropology, the International Journal of Cultural Property and the International Journal of Heritage Studies.

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Friday, February 4th, 2022 Books, Events, Publications, Research No Comments

CLLAS Graduate Student Research Grants

March 4, 2022
12:00 pm

CLLAS calls for proposals for the 2022 Field Research in Latin America and 2022 Summer Research grants. You can watch a recording of our grant-writing workshop here.

2022 Field Research in Latin America

CLLAS invites graduate students to submit proposals for field research in Latin America (Spanish or Portuguese speaking countries). We expect to award at least three grants for up to $3,300 each to advance research for either master’s students and doctoral candidates. Find the full call at this linked PDF: https://cllas.uoregon.edu/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/2022-Call-for-Latin-American-Field-Research-Proposals-.pdf

2022 Summer Research Grant

In order to encourage and support interdisciplinary graduate student research in the areas of Latinx and Latin American Studies, CLLAS offers summer research support. We expect to award up to three summer grants for $1,500 each to advance research for either master’s or doctoral candidates. We are especially interested in projects that link Latinx Studies or Latin American Studies with other disciplines. Find the full call at this linked PDF: https://cllas.uoregon.edu/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/2022-Call-for-Grad-Proposals-Summer-Research-Grant.pdf

Application Deadline: 12:00 pm (Noon), Friday, March 4, 2022

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Wednesday, February 2nd, 2022 Funding, Graduate students, Research, Uncategorized No Comments

Centerpiece Conversation from the Air, Water, Land Symposium now on CLLAS YouTube Channel

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Wednesday, February 2nd, 2022 Event Videos No Comments

CLLAS Seed Grant Project to Grow at Library of Congress

Stephanie Wood Named 2022-2023 Jay I. Kislak Chair at the Library of Congress

 Stephanie Wood will be the 2022-2023 Jay I. Kislak Chair at the Library of Congress, a position dedicated to the Study of History and Cultures of the Early Americas. As Chair, Wood will advance the Visual Lexicon of Aztec Hieroglyphs, a project that began as a CLLAS funded research project.

“The online searchable database currently has about 1800 hieroglyphs from the Codex Mendoza (c. 1541),” says Wood.  “The goal in the next academic year is to double the dataset in collaboration with colleagues from Mexico, Spain, and the U.S. and to enhance and host a decipherment tool to assist scholars who are striving to analyze glyphs on additional codices. We are also beginning to add examples of iconography that could be helpful in achieving a deeper understanding of the intended meaning of hieroglyphs. Another long-range goal is to create materials for teaching hieroglyphs to students anywhere, but especially those who have Mexican origins and might be interested in learning more about their rich heritage.”

The Jay I. Kislak Chair was created four years ago for senior scholars, and it represents a career capstone. One cannot apply for this position, it is bestowed, with candidates being nominated and then chosen by a selection committee.   Recipients are allowed to work on a research project of their choice for nine months with generous support.  The endowment also funds an international symposium that will host guests who share the research interest of the Chair.

The Visual Lexicon of Aztec Hieroglyphs (while still in development) can be seen here:https://aztecglyphs.uoregon.edu/

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