CLLAS Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Project

April 8, 2022
12:00 pm

CLLAS announces the Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Project in Latinx and/or Latin American-related issues in any field of study. The purpose of this award is to acknowledge academic excellence for outstanding undergraduate coursework. We welcome applicants from any major whose coursework focuses on Latinx and/or Latin American issues.

We expect to award four prizes of $400 each to undergraduate students who have demonstrated excellence through an undergraduate thesis, research paper, capstone project, STEM project, or creative work. See submission process and criteria in this linked PDF: https://cllas.uoregon.edu/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/CLLAS-Undergraduate-Award-Announcement-2022.pdf

Submission Deadline: 12P.M. (Noon) on Friday, April 8, 2022.

Watch the Air, Water, Land Symposium

The Air, Water, Land: Native/Indigenous, Black, and Afro-Descendent Relationalities and Activism symposium was a powerful intersection of activism and community. Thank you to all who made it possible! A recording is now available. If you were unable to participate or want to watch your favorite session again, please find it linked here.

Air, Water, Land symposium recorded video link

UO named a top producer of Gilman Scholarship recipients

From Around the O

The University of Oregon has been named one of nation’s 20 top producers of Gilman Scholars as part of the 20th anniversary celebration of the prestigious Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship.

The announcement comes after the UO surpassed its record for the most Gilman awards in a single year with 30 students receiving the scholarship in 2021 alone. The U.S. Department of State, which runs the Gilman program, recognized the UO as one of the 20 top-producing schools in the large university category with 293 Gilman Scholars since the program began in 2001.

The Gilman Scholarship is one of the most competitive national scholarships for undergraduates looking to fund their study or internship abroad experiences. The scholarship makes study abroad more accessible to outstanding and diverse American students with high financial need who otherwise would not have the funding for an international academic experience.

“We believe that transformative international experiences should be accessible to all students,” said Dennis Galvan, dean and vice provost for global engagement. “We’re delighted to see that many UO students have had the opportunity to study abroad in large part because of the Gilman Scholarship.”

Read the rest of the Around the O article here: https://around.uoregon.edu/content/uo-named-top-producer-gilman-scholarship-recipients

Immigrant Oregon panel discussion

October 28, 2021
7:00 pm

175 Knight Law Center
Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics

This panel features authors of a new report, “A State of Immigrants:  A New Look at the Immigrant Experience in Oregon.”  The report documents the actions of immigrants and the adoption of public policies and community level strategies in Oregon that are helping immigrants and refugees achieve social, civic, cultural, and economic integration.    
The report, made available here, was coordinated and edited by Bob Bussel, director of the UO Labor Education and Research Center, and includes contributions by an interdisciplinary group of scholars from the University of Oregon, Oregon State University and Portland State University. The event, which is free and open to the public, is part of the Wayne Morse Center’s Public Affairs Speaker Series and is cosponsored by the UO Labor Education Research Center and made possible by the Philip H. Knight Chair Fund. 

Livestreaming will be available for this event. Please register  to be notified of any event changes. This event is subject to UO COVID guidelines; refer to the UO COVID-19 Resource page for more details. 

Panelists
Daniel López-Cevallos is an associate professor of Latina/o/x studies, ethnic studies, and health equity and the assistant vice provost for undergraduate education at OSU. His research focuses on the intersections of race/ethnicity, gender, class, and other socioeconomic and sociocultural constructs, and their relationship to health and health care issues. He is invested in the development and implementation of community, institutional, and policy-level strategies to better serve Latinx and other marginalized communities.

Lola Loustaunau is a UO sociology graduate student and Wayne Morse Graduate Research Fellow. Her research interests are in the sociology of labor, migration, emotions, and gender, especially looking into the working conditions and collective organizing of precarious workers with an intersectional frame. Her dissertation which focuses on immigrant and refugee women employed in food processing in the Pacific Northwest and their experiences as essential workers during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Maggie Mitteis is a third year doctoral student in the Critical and Sociocultural Studies in Education Program at UO. She’s also a part-time faculty member in Lane Community College’s English as a Second Language Department. Her research focuses on English language learners and their identities both in and outside the classroom environment.

Lynn Stephen is Philip H. Knight Chair, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences, and professor of anthropology at UO. Stephen’s scholarly work centers on the impact of globalization, migration, nationalism and the politics of culture on indigenous communities in the Americas. Through her concept of transborder communities and migrations, Stephen has produced ground-breaking analysis on gender, economic development, gendered violence, asylum and migration, globalization and social movements, indigenous autonomy, and the history of Latinx communities spread across multiple borders. 

Moderator
Since 2002, Bob Bussel has been director of the Labor Education and Research Center at UO, where he is also a history professor. As a labor educator, Bob has conducted trainings and workshops in the areas of strategic planning, leadership development, organizational change, political and community engagement, and labor history. Bussel has long been interested in issues affecting immigrant workers. He edited a 2008 University of Oregon report on the immigrant experience in Oregon and later helped organize the Integration Network for Immigrants in Lane County, a group that seeks to create more welcoming communities for immigrants and their families.

Air, Water, Land: Fall 2021 Symposium

November 4, 2021
9:00 amto5:00 pm

Air, Water, Land 

Native/Indigenous, Black, and Afro-Descendent Relationalities and Activism 

November 4, 2021

This symposium will feature three remote panels that explore connections and intersections in activism through air, land, and water, a keynote conversation, and a final discussion and demonstration of sustainable food systems. This event is organized by the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS), Native American and Indigenous Studies, Anthropology, Black Studies, the Global Justice Initiative, and the Common Reading program of the University of Oregon.

Climate change, environmental racism, settler colonialism, white supremacy, patriarchy, north/south divides, and unequal access to basic environmental resources by communities of color have inspired ongoing environmental justice activism in the Americas.

This symposium will center Indigenous and Black voices, leverage the campus residencies of Maya activist and teacher Irma Alicia Velasquez Nimatuj (in residence through the Global Justice Initiative and the Department of Anthropology) and Muskogee/Creek artist and activist Amber Starks (in residence through the UO Common Reading program) and focus on environmental justice and sustainable food systems. Designed to foster critical conversations from Indigenous and Black/Afro-descendant communities across the Americas, this event is organized around themes of air, land, and water, with a committed focus to issues impacting local communities. 

Coast Fork, Willamette River, Kalapuya ilihi

The University of Oregon is located on Kalapuya ilihi, the traditional indigenous homeland of the Kalapuya people.

Following treaties between 1851 and 1855, Kalapuya people were dispossessed of their indigenous homeland by the United States government and forcibly removed to the Coast Reservation in Western Oregon.

Today, Kalapuya descendants are primarily citizens of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, and they continue to make important contributions to their communities, to the UO, to Oregon, and to the world.

Symposium Description in Spanish



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Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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