Optimism, broad communications experiences drive new SOJC dean

Juan-Carlos Molleda

Juan-Carlos Molleda

July 15, 2016—“Juan-Carlos Molleda starts each day with a cup of freshly ground Colombian coffee and a good dose of NPR. Then he scans The New York Times, Washington Post, Oregonian, Economist and his Twitter feed to see what’s happening in global news.

“‘It’s a challenge to remain optimistic, but for me it’s a priority,’ he says.

“Optimism is a given for the new Edwin L. Artzt Dean of the School of Journalism and Communication, who also brings a fresh perspective and a firm commitment to ensuring a vibrant future for the SOJC.

“‘I have big shoes to fill but I am so excited,’ Molleda said. ‘I will be articulating the message of the school and building bridges not only in local and state communities, but nationally and internationally. I’m also looking forward to collaborating with my colleagues and helping them achieve greater heights.’

“Formerly chair of the Department of Public Relations at the University of Florida, Molleda created and directed UF’s online master’s program in global strategic communication, was an affiliated faculty member of UF’s Center for Latin American Studies, and served as a Fulbright senior specialist.”

For the full story, go to Around the O: Optimism, broad communications experiences drive new SOJC dean | Around the O

Journalism in the Face of Government Oppression: Javier Borelli

October 25, 2016
6:00 pmto7:00 pm
October 26, 2016
12:00 pmto1:00 pm


Mexican Bracero Food and Foodways: New Mexico and West Texas, 1942-1964

October 6, 2016
4:00 pmto5:30 pm

Browsing Room
Knight Library
1501 Kincaid St.
UO campus

photo-2Please join us October 6, 2016 from 4:00-5:30 in the Browsing Room of the Knight Library for this presentation by Juan Manuel Mendoza Guerrero, Autonomous University of Sinaloa, Mexico

Food was a central concern for the Mexican workers who arrived to the U.S. under the so-called Bracero Program (BP), from 1942-1964 and “braceros’” decisions about migrating, remaining, or returning to their home country. Food was a source of diplomatic controversy between the signatory countries to the BP; at the same time, food served as raw material for those sectors of U.S. society that were opposed to this massive immigration coming from Mexico. Southern New Mexico and West Texas formed a region of intense immigration of Mexican laborers, attracted by the cultivation of cotton, alfalfa, and vegetables. Unlike in California, the food patterns of laborers in this region were influenced by the proximity to Mexico, by the size of farms (smaller than in California), and by the existence of people of Mexican origin who acted as employers. While bracero food in this area did not escape the influence of U.S. national guidelines, which sought to make the tastes and preferences of braceros consistent with “scientific” food, bracero eating habits were a dynamic reflecting disadvantages such as low wages and vulnerabilities in hiring with the ability to cook for themselves and the reality of having Mexico nearby. › Continue reading

Cherríe Moraga: Lorwin Lecture on Civil Rights & Civil Liberties

October 13, 2016
6:00 pmto8:00 pm
October 14, 2016
10:00 amto11:30 am
Cherríe Moraga

Cherríe Moraga

Lorwin Lecture
“The Last Exhale of Our Mother’s Breath” — The ‘Work’ of the First Generation Writer

Crater Lake Rooms
Erb Memorial Union (EMU)
1222 E. 13th Ave.

Activist Methods Workshop
Many Nations Longhouse
1630 Columbia St.
Workshop space limited:
please RSVP to csws@uoregon.edu

The UO Center for the Study of Women in Society (CSWS) hosts esteemed and iconic Chicana writer, feminist activist, poet, essayist, and playwright Cherríe Moraga for the keynote Lorwin Lecture on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties at 6 p.m. on Thursday, October 13 at the Erb Memorial Union on the UO campus. She will lead an activist methods workshop (see description below) for faculty and graduate students from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Friday, October 14 at the Many Nations Longhouse. Workshop space is limited. Please RSVP to csws@uorgon.edu to reserve your space. CLLAS is a cosponsor. › Continue reading

“Improving the Quality of Early Childhood Education in the Context of the UN Sustainable Development Goals,” Dr. Hiro Yoshikawa

October 14, 2016

pioneering-human-differences-and-individual-lives-tyler-2016Ford Lecture Hall
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)
1430 Johnson Lane
UO campus

Leona Tyler Lecture: Dr. Hirokazu Yoshikawa

Please join us October 14th, from 2:30-4 pm, in the Ford Lecture Hall of the Schnitzer, for Dr. Hirokazu Yoshikawa’s presentation entitled, “Improving the Quality of Early Childhood Education in the Context of
the UN Sustainable Development Goals.” This presentation takes place on the same day as the Activist Methods workshop by Cherríe Moraga on Civil Rights & Civil Liberties, but there is no overlap in these two
excellent events. › Continue reading

Mixed-Status Families In the US/Mexico Borderlands

October 3, 2016
1:30 pmto3:00 pm


castaneda_talk_final2Knight Library
Browsing Room

Mixed-Status Families In the US/Mexico Borderlands: Inequality and the Meanings of Citizenship in the Contemporary Migration Experience

A talk by Dr. Heide Castañeda (Anthropology, University of South Florida)

Monday October 3, 1:30-3pm

There are 2.3 million mixed-status families in the US, in which the undocumented legal status of some members influences opportunities and resources for all. A focus on individuals in law and policy largely overlooks cumulative ripple effects on families, although individuals are always embedded within these complex social units. This talk examines how mixed-status families experience specific policies related to health care, education, and mobility, and seeks to understand how they collectively navigate opportunities and obstacles. It is necessary to understand the experiences of these families – including and especially the impacts on some 4.5 million US citizen children – in order to ensure equitable application of policy and to reduce disparities. › Continue reading

Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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Event Calendar

October 2016