Héctor Tobar’s Book on Chilean Mine Workers Named among the New York Times “100 Notable Books of 2014”

Tobar_bookcover_WEBThe latest book by CLLAS-affiliated faculty member Héctor Tobar—a visiting professor in the UO School of Journalism and Communication and a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist—has been named among the New York Times “100 Notable Books of 2014.”

Deep Down Dark: The Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine and the Miracle That Set Them Free (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, October 2014) is a nonfiction novel that describes the 2010 odyssey of Chilean mine workers. Here is the publisher’s synopsis.

Congratulations to Professor Tobar!

 

Human Rights Curriculum Workshop

June 5, 2015
3:30 pmto5:00 pm

 

 

Featuring:

  • Stephanie Wood, PhD, Director, Wired Humanities Projects, University of Oregon
  • June Irene Black, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art / Assistant Curator for the Arts of the Americas and Europe, University of Oregon
  • Erin Beck, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Oregon
  • Yvonne Braun, Associate Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies and International Studies

Retreat for Middle and High School Teachers: Human Rights

June 6, 2015
10:00 amto4:00 pm

Knight Library 144
Edmiston Classroom

This retreat will include these panels:

Topic 1: “Gender, Violence and Impunity in Latin America and South Asia,” led by Dr. Lynn Stephen (Anthropology) and Dr. Lamia Karim (Anthropology).

Topic 2: “Teaching Human Rights in Latin America: Problems, Sources, and
Methods,” led by Dr. Carlos Aguirre (History) and David Woken, History & Latin American Studies Librarian.

Topic 3: “Art and Human Rights in Latin America: Pedagogical Approaches”

 

Gerardo Sandoval honored for paper on cross-border networks

Gerardo Sandoval honored for paper on cross-border networks | Around the O.

CLLAS associate director Gerardo Sandoval has been named the 2014 winner of the prestigious Chester Rapkin Award for best article from the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning. See full story in Around the O.

Native Studies Research Colloquium Series: Ana-Maurine Lara, I was born here: Denationalization, National Sovereignty and Racial Formations”

April 7, 2015
12:00 pmto1:30 pm
Ana-Maurine Lara

Ana-Maurine Lara

Many Nations Longhouse
1630 Columbia St.
UO campus
Bring-your-own-lunch (BYOL)

Native Studies Research Colloquium Series

The Native American Studies Research colloquium series is a forum for scholars to present their research for discussion at the University of Oregon.  All events are free and open to the public.

“I was born here: Denationalization, National Sovereignty and Racial Formations”
presented by Ana-Maurine Lara, CLLAS Visiting Scholar

This paper focuses on Black-Indian (Afro-Indigenous) relations in mainland and on island America, comparing the denationalization of Cherokee Freedmen and Dominicans of Haitian descent. The paper is a philosophical query into the interstices between struggles for native sovereignty, racial formations and citizenship, and draws on these seemingly disparate examples to engage two principle questions: 1) how do our colonial racial legacies manifest themselves in the struggles for citizenship in the context of Native/Indigenous sovereign nations? 2) What do sovereign Native/Indigenous nations gain from the exclusion of “black” subjects?

Ana-Maurine Lara is the first ever Visiting Scholar with the UO Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies. She recently completed her PhD in African American Studies and Anthropology at Yale University. Her first academic book (in-progress) is titled Bodies and Souls: Sexual Terror in God’s New World, and is based on her graduate research, which focused on LGBT political activism and the Catholic state in the Dominican Republic.

She is an award-winning novelist and poet. Her novels include Erzulie’s Skirt (RedBone Press 2006) and When the Sun Once Again Sang to the People (KRK Ediciones 2011); her short stories and poems have been featured in numerous anthologies and literary magazines. Her published scholarship engages topics on Afro-Latin@ and Afro-Diasporic queer identities and aesthetics.

Teaming up in Medford: Latino Roots and the Latino Civic Participation Project

Medford, OR – The Latino Roots Exhibit on display at the 2014 Multicultural Fair.

Medford, OR – The Latino Roots Exhibit on display at the 2014 Multicultural Fair.

September 26, 2014—Gerardo Sandoval, associate director of the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies, took his graduate students to the Greater Medford Multicultural Fair in Medford, Ore., on Saturday, September 26 to explain findings from the Latino Civic Participation Project. Sandoval, an assistant professor in the UO Department of Planning, Public Policy & Management, said that he was able to connect with about 25 key people who work with diversity issues in Medford. He and his students also spoke about their findings with about 100 Latinos who attended the fair. Professor Sandoval is the project coordinator for the CLLAS Advancing Latino Equity in Oregon Project.



Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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