Founding director Lynn Stephen passes CLLAS leadership torch

A Farewell Letter from CLLAS founding director Lynn Stephen

Lynn Stephen holds a plaque that commemorates her service to CLLAS.

Lynn Stephen holds a plaque that commemorates her service to CLLAS.

Nine years ago, I worked with others to begin creating an intellectual community and collaborative research space that would connect UO faculty, students, and administrators to Latino and Latin American communities in Oregon, the United States, and abroad. Because this kind of space didn’t exist, we had to build it. Our vision was hemispheric, bringing together Latino/a and Latin American studies across many different borders, disciplines, and perspectives. We believed that intellectual and human connections that brought community into the university and the university into the community were at the heart of knowledge production, teaching, and research.

In the fall of 2007, the life of CLLAS began when an official advisory board was formed with Carlos Aguirre, Cecilia Enjuto Rangel, Pedro Garcia-Caro, Michael Hames-García, Kathryn Lynch, Ernesto Martínez, Gabriela Martínez, Edward Olivos, Analisa Taylor, Tania Triana, Stephanie Wood, and me as members. From that beginning, CLLAS has grown from a small center that was incubated with the support of the Center for the Study of Women in Society to an independent research center that sponsors dozens of events every year, supports graduate student and faculty research, runs four research action projects, and is widely connected in the state of Oregon, the United States, and in a number of Latin American countries.

On Saturday, April 24, 2010, CLLAS was formally launched at a family-friendly event at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art with CLLAS board members, community activists, students, and other supporters. Following are some of our outstanding accomplishments over the past six years:  › Continue reading

Video link to “Latin@s and the 2016 Election: Policies, Immigration, & Action”

Video Link: http://media.uoregon.edu/channel/archives/10890

Latin@s-Elección-2016_EspañolLatin@s and the 2016 Election: Policies, Immigration, & Action

This election season event allowed UO faculty and students to meet with people from a half dozen different community organizations to talk, strategize,  build relationships, and plan an agenda together. Meeting on campus at Straub Hall, “Latin@s and the 2016 Election: Policies, Immigration, and Action” drew an audience focused on exploring the current nature of the Latin@ electorate and the issues most relevant to this constituency.

Presenters included Larry Kleinman, head of National Initiatives, CAPACES Leadership Institute, and Antonio Huerta, Outreach Manager, Opportunities Program, University of Oregon. The event featured sessions on gender, immigration and deportation, and youth participation. Speakers also discussed the presidential candidates and their respective policy positions.

“People who don’t normally get together were afforded an opportunity to do so,” observed CLLAS co-director Lynn Stephen. She noted the presence of participants from the national Dreamers movement, and activists from Kids on the Border, Centro LatinoAmericano, CAUSA, and PCUN. “CLLAS was able to further our commitment, links, and relationships with these organizations,” she said.

Now available: Spring 2016 CLLAS Notes

0516_CLLAS_Notes_WEB_Page_1Spring 2016 CLLAS_Notes

CLLAS founding director Lynn Stephen passes the torch of leadership and highlights the history and many achievements of the past nine years in the formation and growth of the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies.

This spring issue of CLLAS Notes also includes greetings from the 2016-17 interim director, Gabriela Martínez, an associate professor in the School of Journalism and Communication. You’ll learn about Anabel Lopez-Salinas’s experiences as CLLAS Visiting Scholar. UO graduate student Lidiana Soto tells her moving personal story about crossing the border in her comments made as a panelist at the CSWS Northwest Women Writers Symposium.

Read about CLLAS-supported faculty and graduate student research and news and updates on research action projects, our Latino Roots Project, and faculty and graduate student achievements. Updates on CLLAS events include the CLLAS spring forum “Latin@s and the 2016 Election: Policies, Immigration, and Action,” a concert by Zapotec hip-hop artist Mare Advertencia Lirika, and a visit by artist Hector Villegas.

All this and more are included in this spring 2016 edition of CLLAS Notes, the twice-yearly newsletter for the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies. Watch for yours soon in your campus or home mailbox, or view it now online.

“Invisible No More” — a look at the research of Julie Weise

“On a summer day in 2004, Julie Weise strode up to an aged stone building in Mexico City that housed the archives of the secretary of foreign relations for Mexico. She had a simple question: How long have Mexicans been in the Deep South—states like Georgia, the Carolinas, Louisiana?” — from the Spring 2016 issue of Cascades magazine.  Read more: Invisible No More | Cascade: University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences

Editor’s Note: an assistant professor in the UO Department of History, Julie Weise is also a CLLAS faculty affiliate. She is the author of Corazon de Dixie: Mexicanos in the U.S. South since 1910 (University of North Carolina Press, Fall 2015).

Sad Happiness: Cinthya’s Transborder Journey

Sad-Happiness-DVD-front-coverSad Happiness: Cinthya’s Transborder Journey

directed by Lynn Stephen; produced by Sonia De La Cruz and Lynn Stephen
Creative Commons
(2015)
39 minutes

Lynn Stephen is co-director of CLLAS and a professor in the UO Department of Anthropology.

This documentary “explores the differential rights that U.S. citizen children and their undocumented parents have through the story of one extended Zapotec family. Shot in Oregon and Oaxaca, Mexico, and narrated by eleven-year old Cinthya, the film follows Cinthya’s trip to her parent’s home community of Teotitlán del Valle with her godmother, anthropologist Lynn Stephen. There she meets her extended family and discovers her indigenous Zapotec and Mexican roots. … At a larger level, Cinthya’s story illuminates the desires and struggles of the millions of families divided between the U.S. and other countries where children are mobile citizens and parents cannot leave. In English, Spanish, and Zapotec with English subtitles. TRT: 39 minutes.

Watch it on Vimeo at these links:  Sad Happiness: English   Sad Happiness: Spanish

Ricardo Valencia’s CLLAS-supported research paper recognized by AEJMC

Ricardo Valencia

Ricardo Valencia

Ricardo J. Valencia won third place in the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) Minorities and Communication’s student research paper competition for his study, partially funded by CLLAS, “At the border: A comparative examination of U.S. newspaper coverage about unaccompanied immigrant minors.” Valencia hopes to present the research in the AEJMC national conference in August 2016.

His study examines the reporting of the flow of Central American unaccompanied children in 2014, aiming to find if the concentration of foreign-born Central Americans could influence the journalistic routines of four U.S. newspapers. Valencia examined hundreds of articles and sources of information published in four U.S. newspapers. The project helps understand the dynamic between non-Latino and Latino sources and reveals who led the media narrative of this phenomenon. › Continue reading



Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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