Increasing the Visibility of Your Humanities or Social Science Research

June 3, 2016
3:00 pmto5:30 pm

Americas-Soc-Sc-Rsch-June-3-finalKnight Library
Browsing Room
1501 Kincaid St.
UO campus

Come learn how to increase the visibility of your humanities and social science work among academic and non-academic audiences from a panel of experts including the University of Oregon’s Lauren Kessler (School of Journalism and Communication), Nicole Dahmen (School of Journalism and Communication), Molly Blancett from UO Media Relations, Jennifer Lawless (Professor of Government at American University), and Marty Brown (Marketing Manager from OSU Press). We’ll discuss many topics including how to promote your book, creating professional networks, and promoting your work using traditional and social media. › Continue reading

Sad Happiness: Cinthya’s Transborder Journey

Sad-Happiness-DVD-front-coverSad Happiness: Cinthya’s Transborder Journey

directed by Lynn Stephen; produced by Sonia De La Cruz and Lynn Stephen
Creative Commons
(2015)
39 minutes

Lynn Stephen is co-director of CLLAS and a professor in the UO Department of Anthropology.

This documentary “explores the differential rights that U.S. citizen children and their undocumented parents have through the story of one extended Zapotec family. Shot in Oregon and Oaxaca, Mexico, and narrated by eleven-year old Cinthya, the film follows Cinthya’s trip to her parent’s home community of Teotitlán del Valle with her godmother, anthropologist Lynn Stephen. There she meets her extended family and discovers her indigenous Zapotec and Mexican roots. … At a larger level, Cinthya’s story illuminates the desires and struggles of the millions of families divided between the U.S. and other countries where children are mobile citizens and parents cannot leave. In English, Spanish, and Zapotec with English subtitles. TRT: 39 minutes.

Watch it on Vimeo at these links:  Sad Happiness: English   Sad Happiness: Spanish

Ricardo Valencia’s CLLAS-supported research paper recognized by AEJMC

Ricardo Valencia

Ricardo Valencia

Ricardo J. Valencia won third place in the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) Minorities and Communication’s student research paper competition for his study, partially funded by CLLAS, “At the border: A comparative examination of U.S. newspaper coverage about unaccompanied immigrant minors.” Valencia hopes to present the research in the AEJMC national conference in August 2016.

His study examines the reporting of the flow of Central American unaccompanied children in 2014, aiming to find if the concentration of foreign-born Central Americans could influence the journalistic routines of four U.S. newspapers. Valencia examined hundreds of articles and sources of information published in four U.S. newspapers. The project helps understand the dynamic between non-Latino and Latino sources and reveals who led the media narrative of this phenomenon. › Continue reading

Strengthening Networks of Support Among Latin@ Students at UO

Supported by the Latino Strategy Group (LSG), Center for Latino/a and Latin-American Studies, Department of Education Studies, and the Department of Romance Languages.

Strengthening Networks of Support Among Latin@ Students at UO
final executive report of the Latino Strategy Group

Executive summary (final) 

Latino Strategy Group research team: 

  • Angel Dorantes, Doctoral Student, Critical and Sociocultural Studies in Education
  • Claudia Holguín Mendoza, Assistant Professor of Spanish, Director of Spanish Heritage Language Program
  • Audrey Lucero, Assistant Professor of Language and Literacy Education
  • Luz M Romero Montaño, Ph.D., Romance Languages
  • Analisa Taylor, Associate Professor of Spanish

The Latino Strategy Group (LSG) is an emerging alliance of faculty, staff, students, and community members collaborating to improve educational access and equity among Latin@ students at UO and in the local area. The LSG seeks to make mentoring and advocacy work for and with Latin@ students visible to the wider university community, to coordinate with networks of support already in place, and to advocate for the expansion of resources in accordance with increasing Latin@ student enrollments. In 2015, with a grant from Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies, we researched how UO Latin@ students perceive and negotiate the academic and sociocultural expectations of a flagship state university. We sent a Qualtrics survey to 1,700 undergraduate students, who self identified as “Latin@”. One hundred and seventeen students responded. This research gathered useful information for administrators and faculty members as they continue to improve the recruitment, retention, and on-time graduation of Latin@ students.

For the full report: Executive summary (final)

Julie Weise Wins 2016 Merle Curti Award for Best Book in U.S. Social History

weise_corazon_PB-199x300Corazón de Dixie: Mexicanos in the U.S. South Since 1910, written by UO assistant professor of history Julie Weise and published by University of North Carolina Press, has been chosen to receive this year’s Merle Curti Award for Best Book in U.S. Social History from the Organization of American Historians.

Corazón de Dixie also received an Honorable Mention for the Theodore Saloutos Award for best book in immigration history from the Immigration and Ethnic History Society.

Professor Weise is an affiliated faculty member of the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS). For more about her book, see: http://cllas.uoregon.edu/6369-2/

Es un tema latino, pero las fuentes de la prensa en inglés no son latinas – The Washington Post

Ricardo Valencia analiza cómo se trató el tema de los niños migrantes en varios periódicos

Ricardo Valencia

Ricardo Valencia

Source: Es un tema latino, pero las fuentes de la prensa en inglés no son latinas – The Washington Post — April 3, 2017

CLLAS graduate student grantee Ricardo Valencia, a PhD candidate in the UO School of Journalism and Communication, was recently interviewed about his research on undocumented children for El Tiempo Latino, the Washington Post’s Spanish-language supplement.

Valencia gave a talk on campus in late January about his research, “At the Border: A comparative analysis of U.S.newspaper reporting about unaccompanied immigrant children.”



Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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