Native Studies Research Colloquium — Lynn Stephen, “Transborder Gendered Violence and Resistance: Indigenous Women Migrants Seeking U.S. Asylum”

December 1, 2014
12:00 pmto1:30 pm
Lynn Stephen / photo by Jack Liu.

Lynn Stephen / photo by Jack Liu.

Many Nations Longhouse
1630 Columbia St.
UO campus
Free & open to the public
(Bring Your Own Lunch)

“Transborder Gendered Violence and Resistance: Indigenous Women Migrants Seeking U.S. Asylum”

a talk by Dr. Lynn Stephen, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences, Department of Anthropology, and Director of the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS) at the University of Oregon

Professor Lynn Stephen’s scholarly work has centered the impact of globalization, migration, nationalism and the politics of culture on indigenous communities in the Americas. Her multi-leveled approach, which engages political-economy, ethnohistory, and ethnography, has provided a hemispheric lens on major challenges faced by indigenous peoples such as out-migration, tourism, economic development, and low-intensity war and their creative responses to these challenges. › Continue reading

UO historian Julie M. Weise interviewed for story on NPR

CLLAS affiliated faculty member Julie M. Weise, an assistant professor in the Department of History at the University of Oregon, spoke about her research and was identified as a UO historian in a piece that aired on NPR’s All Things Considered on October 19, 2014. The story was about anti-immigrant backlash in suburbs. It can be accessed online at “Residents Uneasy About Immigrant Shift Into Suburbs.”

CLLAS Graduate Student Grant Proposal Writing Workshop

January 22, 2015
12:00 pmto1:30 pm

Location: TBD

Please join us for a valuable session with a panel of faculty and grad students who will share tips and strategies for writing successful grant proposals.

For more information about CLLAS Graduate Student Research Grants, visit our Funding pages.

 

11 facts for National Hispanic Heritage Month

11 facts for National Hispanic Heritage Month | Pew Research Center.

Eleven facts that look at Latinos in the U.S. by age, geography and origin groups.

Ana-Maurine Lara: CLLAS Visiting Scholar Presentation

February 12, 2015
4:00 pmto5:30 pm
Ana-Maurine Lara

Ana-Maurine Lara

Location: TBD
UO campus

Ana-Maurine Lara is the first ever Visiting Scholar with the UO Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies. She recently completed her PhD in African American Studies and Anthropology at Yale University. Her first academic book (in-progress) is titled Bodies and Souls: Sexual Terror in God’s New World, and is based on her graduate research, which focused on LGBT political activism and the Catholic state in the Dominican Republic.

She is an award-winning novelist and poet. Her novels include Erzulie’s Skirt (RedBone Press 2006) and When the Sun Once Again Sang to the People (KRK Ediciones 2011); her short stories and poems have been featured in numerous anthologies and literary magazines. Her published scholarship engages topics on Afro-Latin@ and Afro-Diasporic queer identities and aesthetics.

Native Studies Research Colloquium Series: Ana-Maurine Lara, I was born here: Denationalization, National Sovereignty and Racial Formations”

April 7, 2015
12:00 pmto1:30 pm
Ana-Maurine Lara

Ana-Maurine Lara

Many Nations Longhouse
1630 Columbia St.
UO campus
Bring-your-own-lunch (BYOL)

Native Studies Research Colloquium Series

The Native American Studies Research colloquium series is a forum for scholars to present their research for discussion at the University of Oregon.  All events are free and open to the public.

“I was born here: Denationalization, National Sovereignty and Racial Formations”
presented by Ana-Maurine Lara, CLLAS Visiting Scholar

This paper focuses on Black-Indian (Afro-Indigenous) relations in mainland and on island America, comparing the denationalization of Cherokee Freedmen and Dominicans of Haitian descent. The paper is a philosophical query into the interstices between struggles for native sovereignty, racial formations and citizenship, and draws on these seemingly disparate examples to engage two principle questions: 1) how do our colonial racial legacies manifest themselves in the struggles for citizenship in the context of Native/Indigenous sovereign nations? 2) What do sovereign Native/Indigenous nations gain from the exclusion of “black” subjects?

Ana-Maurine Lara is the first ever Visiting Scholar with the UO Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies. She recently completed her PhD in African American Studies and Anthropology at Yale University. Her first academic book (in-progress) is titled Bodies and Souls: Sexual Terror in God’s New World, and is based on her graduate research, which focused on LGBT political activism and the Catholic state in the Dominican Republic.

She is an award-winning novelist and poet. Her novels include Erzulie’s Skirt (RedBone Press 2006) and When the Sun Once Again Sang to the People (KRK Ediciones 2011); her short stories and poems have been featured in numerous anthologies and literary magazines. Her published scholarship engages topics on Afro-Latin@ and Afro-Diasporic queer identities and aesthetics.



Giving to CLLAS

Follow the link below for instructions on how to give to the University of Oregon. If you want your gift to directly support CLLAS, please enter “Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies” under “Other."

Proceed to the online giving page

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