“From Iguala to El Otro Lado: A Young Girl’s Journey to the American Dream,” NWWS Keynote Talk with author Reyna Grande

May 6, 2016
6:00 pmto8:00 pm

Downtown Eugene Public Library
10th and Olive
100 W. 10th St.
Eugene, OR 97401
Takes place during First Friday Art Walk
Full Schedule: 2016 CSWS Northwest Women Writers Symposium

“From Iguala to El Otro Lado: A young girl’s journey to the American Dream”

Keynote Talk with Reyna Grande followed by Q & A and book signing

Reyna Grande

Reyna Grande

Reyna Grande is an award-winning novelist and memoirist. She has received an American Book Award, the El Premio Aztlán Literary Award, and the Latino Book Award. In 2012, she was a finalist for the prestigious National Book Critics Circle Awards. Her works have been published internationally in countries such as Norway and South Korea.

Born in Iguala, Guerrero, Mexico, Reyna was two years old when her father left for the U.S. to find work. Her mother followed her father north two years later, leaving Reyna and her siblings behind in Mexico. In 1985, when Reyna was going on ten, she entered the U.S. as an undocumented immigrant. She later went on to become the first person in her family to graduate. After attending Pasadena City College for two years, Reyna obtained a B.A. in creative writing and film & video from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She later received her M.F.A. in creative writing from Antioch University. An active promoter of Latino literature, she is a sought-after speaker at high schools, colleges, and universities across the nation.

Her novels, Across a Hundred Mountains and Dancing with Butterflies, were published to critical acclaim and have been read widely in schools across the country. Her latest book, The Distance Between Us, was published in August 2012, by Atria Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster. In this memoir, Reyna writes about her life before and after illegally immigrating from Mexico to the United States. A National Book Circle Critics Award finalist, The Distance Between Us is an inspirational coming-of-age story about the pursuit of a better life. The Los Angeles Times hailed it as ‘the Angela’s Ashes of the modern Mexican immigrant experience.’

Hosted by the Center for the Study of Women in Society at the University of Oregon in cooperation with Eugene Pubic Library, this symposium is generously cosponsored by Oregon Humanities Center’s Endowment for Public Outreach in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities; UO Libraries; Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies; Department of Women’s and Gender Studies; Department of English; School of Journalism and Communication; School of Music and Dance; and the University Health Center.

Zapotec hip-hop artist Mare Advertencia Lirika in concert on her SiempreViva Tour

May 8, 2016
7:30 pmto8:30 pm

Mare_Final

 

Beall Concert Hall
961 E. 18th Ave.
Eugene, OR  97403

SiempreViva Tour with Mare Advertencia Lirika

Mare, a Zapotec hip-hop artist from Oaxaca, Mexico, and founder of Advertencia Lirika, will appear on tour for her new CD, SiempreViva. This event is part of the 5th annual CSWS Northwest Women Writers Symposium.

Mare uses her rap as a tool to develop consciousness and to build networks within social movements in Oaxaca and elsewhere. Always looking to expose the gender inequality that exists in society, she has worked with a wide range of groups and organizations within Mexico and throughout the world.

In June 2012, NRP Music selected Mare’s work as the “Best Alternative Music of the Year” after she toured in 25 U.S. cities in six states. In March 2013, Mare received the Maria Sabina Prize in recognition of her work in promoting women’s rights through music. She narrates her personal history in the documentary film “When A Woman Steps Forward” (2012), directed by Simón Sedillo and produced by Manovuelta. The film can be accessed on YouTube.

This concert is being sponsored by the UO Center for the Study of Women in Society (CSWS), the UO Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS), and the UO School of Music and Dance.

Julie Weise Wins 2016 Merle Curti Award for Best Book in U.S. Social History

weise_corazon_PB-199x300Corazón de Dixie: Mexicanos in the U.S. South Since 1910, written by UO assistant professor of history Julie Weise and published by University of North Carolina Press, has been chosen to receive this year’s Merle Curti Award for Best Book in U.S. Social History from the Organization of American Historians.

Corazón de Dixie also received an Honorable Mention for the Theodore Saloutos Award for best book in immigration history from the Immigration and Ethnic History Society.

Professor Weise is an affiliated faculty member of the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS). For more about her book, see: http://cllas.uoregon.edu/6369-2/

Latin@s and the 2016 Election: Policies, Immigration, and Action

May 13, 2016
4:00 pmto7:00 pm

Latin@s-2016-Election_English

 

 

Straub Hall
Room 156
1451 Onyx St.
UO campus

Latin@s and the 2016 Election: Policies, Immigration, and Action

This event will explore the current nature of the Latin@ electorate and the issues most relevant to this constituency. Presenters will also discuss the presidential candidates and their respective policy positions.

This event will feature:

  • Larry Kleinman, Head of National Initiatives, CAPACES Leadership Institute
  • Antonio Huerta, Outreach Manager, Opportunities Program, University of Oregon
  • Breakout sessions on gender, immigration/deportation, and youth participation
  • The Latino Roots exhibit
  • And more!

Opening Reception: 4 – 4:30 pm

Opening Talk: 4:40 – 5:30 pm     

Break-out Sessions: 5:30 – 6:30 pm

  • Gender and immigration
  • Immigration / deportation
  • Youth–Millennial voting

Closing remarks: 6:30 – 7 pm

Sponsored by the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS).

Es un tema latino, pero las fuentes de la prensa en inglés no son latinas – The Washington Post

Ricardo Valencia analiza cómo se trató el tema de los niños migrantes en varios periódicos

Ricardo Valencia

Ricardo Valencia

Source: Es un tema latino, pero las fuentes de la prensa en inglés no son latinas – The Washington Post — April 3, 2017

CLLAS graduate student grantee Ricardo Valencia, a PhD candidate in the UO School of Journalism and Communication, was recently interviewed about his research on undocumented children for El Tiempo Latino, the Washington Post’s Spanish-language supplement.

Valencia gave a talk on campus in late January about his research, “At the Border: A comparative analysis of U.S.newspaper reporting about unaccompanied immigrant children.”

Combining Activism and Research: Synergies and Obstacles

May 10, 2016
3:00 pmto5:30 pm

AmericasRIG_large_poster_final2Browsing Room
Knight Library
1501 Kincaid St.
UO campus

Panel: Combining Activism and Research: Synergies and Obstacles

Presentations by:

  • Daniel HoSang, UO Department of Political Science
  • Lynn Stephen, UO Department of Anthropology
  • Irma Alicia Velásquez Nimatuj

Irma Alicia Velásquez Nimatuj is a journalist, social anthropologist, and international spokeswoman who has been at the forefront in struggles for respect for indigenous cultures. She was Executive Director of the Mecanismo de Apoyo a Pueblos Indígenas Oxlajuj Tzikin (Support Mechanism for Indigenous Peoples) (2005-2013). Dr. Velásquez Nimatuj is the first Maya-K’iche’ woman to earn the doctorate in Social Anthropology and she initiated the court case that made racial discrimination illegal in Guatemala.

Irma Velasquez

She has won numerous academic fellowships and awards for her journalism, She was a member of the Latin American Consulting Group of Indigenous Leaders for UNICEF and participates in the UN through the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. She also served as advisor on indigenous issues for the Latin American and Caribbean office of UN Women (2014-2015). She is the author of Pueblos Indígenas, Estado y Lucha por Tierra en Guatemala (AVANCSO 2008) and La pequeña burguesía indígena comercial de Guatemala Desigualdades de clase, raza y género (AVANCSO-SERJUS 2002). She writes a weekly newspaper column in elPeriódico de Guatemala and through both her political and academic efforts seeks to create viable and realistic ways to create equality for indigenous people and a truly democratic and participatory democracy in Guatemala.

Sponsored by CSWS’s Americas Research Interest Group (Americas RIG), CLLAS, Department of Political Science, and the College of Arts and Sciences Program Grant.



Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund

Access the above link for giving to the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies Gift Fund. Online gifts may be made using the form available at this link; all gifts are processed by the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization responsible for receiving and administering private donations to the University of Oregon.

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